StromTrooper banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My '08 Wee is getting to the age where it can't hurt to replace the brake lines with stainless steel ones.
I know Spiegler lines are very good and I have them on my other bike, but the Galfers sell for over $30 less.
So. Does anyone have experience with the Galfer brand?

Thanks for your time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Change them out, if for no other reason than they will greatly increase your brake lever feel in threshold braking.

I did my '09 about 3 years ago--no, the OEM lines weren't cracked yet--and it made a huge difference.

I installed new HH sintered brake pads at the same time and they give more initial bite than the organics, albeit a little harder on the rotors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What makes you think that 10 years is the max for your brake line life expectancy? Are they cracked or otherwise showing signs of decay?
I've had an experience with a collapsed rubber line on a vehicle about 15 years old. It was not a pleasant day.:new_shitsmiley:
Besides, i want to fiddle with my bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
I bought the slightly longer Galfer lines a couple years back because I was adding bar risers. They worked well and were an improvement over stock.
Changing the front lines makes for a somewhat tedious bleeding process. Takes a little longer is all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
I have Galfers and think they are an improvement. They don't turn the brakes into Brembos.
But slightly better than stock.
However, on installation I lost an olive crush washer and the bike sat for 10 days waiting for a spare. If you go for it PLEASE ask for an additional spare olive washer on your initial order. You won't find one anywhere else in the universe so get a spare in the beginning. Just in case.
On the improvement level, I think a complete refit is the way to go. Our calipers are very weak and you can't get around that unless you replace them with big pots.
This is the most glaring weakness of our bikes IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
What makes you think that 10 years is the max for your brake line life expectancy? Are they cracked or otherwise showing signs of decay?
Your reply strikes me as a bit odd... Are you actually suggesting that a person should wait until they notice cracking or dryrotting on their brake lines before replacing them? Suzuki recommends replacing brakes lines every 4 years... OP is at 2 1/2 times that interval.
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
1,532 Posts
Your reply strikes me as a bit odd... Are you actually suggesting that a person should wait until they notice cracking or dryrotting on their brake lines before replacing them? Suzuki recommends replacing brakes lines every 4 years... OP is at 2 1/2 times that interval.
4 years is way too cautious IMO. My stock lines looked great after 12 years of service. However, I did feel I was pushing my luck. Some of the other rubber bits (mainly cooling system hoses) had lost their elasticity and I'd already had to replace them to stop leaks.

I was due for new brake fluid this spring, so, why not get new lines at the same time? I also wanted to add taller handlebar risers (Rox 3.5" specifically), so needed extended lines, as well as new ones.

I got the Galfer +2" lines from Adventuretech, and installed them a few weeks ago. They've been great.

I'm skeptical that the "improved brake feel" is anything but placebo effect, but I definitely have nice brake response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
4 years is way too cautious IMO. My stock lines looked great after 12 years of service. However, I did feel I was pushing my luck. Some of the other rubber bits (mainly cooling system hoses) had lost their elasticity and I'd already had to replace them to stop leaks.

I was due for new brake fluid this spring, so, why not get new lines at the same time? I also wanted to add taller handlebar risers (Rox 3.5" specifically), so needed extended lines, as well as new ones.

I got the Galfer +2" lines from Adventuretech, and installed them a few weeks ago. They've been great.

I'm skeptical that the "improved brake feel" is anything but placebo effect, but I definitely have nice brake response.
I agree that the maintenance schedule is very cautious, but to imply that someone should ignore the manufacturer recommendation by more than 2.5x because there may not be visible signs of rot/crack. Brakes are pretty darned important... The majority of riders are hard pressed to keep proper air in their tires, much less full inspection of the entire length of their brake hoses and associated fittings on a regular schedule.
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
1,532 Posts
FWIW, I finally got around to replacing the stock clutch line with the Galfer +2" from Adventuretech.

Easy peasy install. After draining the fluid and unbolting the old line at both ends, I zip-tied lower banjo of new line to upper banjo of old line, to drag the new line through the frame to avoid having to move plastic/tank etc. for access. Did the wooden dowel thing to rotate the lower banjo to correct orientation, snugged bolts & new crush washers, filled & bled fluid.

This is just the thing if you want to use 3.5" risers and/or angle them very far back.

I'm replacing the rear line with a Galfer as well. Just received it today, not in a particular hurry to install though - requires moving some plastic, and I inhaled enough brake fluid vapor last week. :p
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
1,532 Posts
I could arguably leave the factory rubber hose on the rear brake, but I can't abide having an unmatched set. So I finally got around to it today.

Wasn't the worst install ever, just a bit tedious to get the side cover off so I could access the rear master cylinder.

One area of concern: There is a length of flexible metal sleeve covering the front end of the original rear brake hose, where it curls through about a 200° turn to head back to the rear caliper.

I believe this metal sleeve is probably intended as a heat shield, as this turn in the brake line passes pretty close to an exhaust pipe.

It wasn't possible to salvage this heat shield from the factory hose. It won't fit over either banjo, so I would have had to cut it to get off.

Have you had any reports of the Galfer rear brake lines getting cooked? I hope the PVC coating doesn't melt from exhaust heat, even if the inner braided steel isn't likely to be damaged. Would also be a bummer if the brake fluid got too hot. Rear brake isn't essential for safety, but is useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Just ordered some +2 spieglers. I've never replaced lines before, any tips for bleeding them? Or is it just lots of extra 'cycles' to get the air out.
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
1,532 Posts
Just ordered some +2 spieglers. I've never replaced lines before, any tips for bleeding them? Or is it just lots of extra 'cycles' to get the air out.
Having swapped both sets of lines + a couple of brake fluid replacements on my Vee, here are some thoughts & tips:

-Get yourself a good bleed/vacuum pump kit, like this Harbor Freight one: https://www.harborfreight.com/brake-bleeder-and-vacuum-pump-kit-69328.html

-Buy the big bottle (32 oz.) of store-brand DOT 4 brake fluid at Walmart. It's not expensive & you'll have more than enough. The front and rear brake systems together hold only a few oz. of fluid, so you'll have plenty to flush/bleed front brakes, rear brakes, and clutch (on DL1000).

-I was never able to get a solid, completely bubble-less flow coming out of the bleed screws. Not sure why. Maybe it was air leaking in around the bleed screw threads, when cracked open?

-So what I did instead was, I flushed the entire contents of the master cylinder through, 3-4 times per caliper.

-While doing the above, don't ever let the master cylinder run completely dry - you'll suck air into the lines.

-With new lines, I don't think it matters in what order you bleed the front calipers. The aftermarket line setups typically have a double-banjo at the master cylinder, so each caliper has its own line, therefore there's no "longest" line to flush first.

-To be extra-careful about getting any possible air out of the system - once you're pretty sure you've got all air out of the calipers, do the following:

--Squeeze the brake lever in (or push the pedal down, as appropriate) all the way and hold.

--Place a rag around the banjo bolt on the master cylinder.

--Crack the banjo open just a touch.

--Fluid will come out, hopefully the rag will catch it. Tighten the banjo back down, then release the brake lever.

--This should get rid of any bubbles hiding in the master cylinder banjo bolt.

-When done with all the above: secure the brake lever all the way in, and leave it that way overnight. Either place the master cylinder cover loosely, or leave the cover off & drape a rag over the cylinder (the idea is that you don't want random debris drifting into the master cylinder while it sits uncovered).

-By the next morning, any remaining air should have bubbled up and escaped. Screw the master cylinder lid back on, and you're good to go.

Hope this helps.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top