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I was picking up a new snowblower, the shop owner was giving me the hows and whys and mentioned his recomendation to drain the fuel before long term storage due to the harmful effects of Ethanol. He also rides and stated that his bike also gets drained for the winter.

What do y'all recomend, fill the tank with stabilized gas or run it dry for the winter?

I live in NY which does not have a single outlet for non Ethanol gas, so that is not an option.

Thanks,
YH
 

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I think some people worry too often about too much.

Throw some fresh oil in her, top up with stabilized gas, ride a bit to get the stabilized gas distributed throughout the entire fuel system, sleep easy.



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I think some people worry too often about too much.

Throw some fresh oil in her, top up with stabilized gas, ride a bit to get the stabilized gas distributed throughout the entire fuel system, sleep easy.



Sent from my droid.
+1 this is what I do on my fuel injected bikes. On the carb bikes I do run the carbs until the bike quits and then I drain the small amount of fuel left.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Empty steel tanks are prone to condensation. I keep mine full with fuel and marine Sta-Bil.
 

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Empty steel tanks are prone to condensation. I keep mine full with fuel and marine Sta-Bil.
Why marine? Curious.

I just put in a bit more of the basic stabil.



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Types of Sta-Bil

I suspect the New! STA-BIL Ethanol Treatment is more for marketing than for any new functionality.
 

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I think some people worry too often about too much.

Throw some fresh oil in her, top up with stabilized gas, ride a bit to get the stabilized gas distributed throughout the entire fuel system, sleep easy.

Sent from my droid.
+2. I throw a rubber/vinyl door mat under the front tire, connect the Battery Tender, and cover. I sleep very well. :yesnod:
 

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At the end of the winter season, I always change the oil, drain the gas and let it run until the tank (and carb bowl) is dry. Works for me, never had a problem with the engine, carb or gas tank.

This process was repeated 45 times so far. First by my Dad, now by me. It's an Ariens blower made in 1966.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I have started filling my bike with premium gas for winter storage, as it contains no ethenol, I also run stabilizer through it.
That depends on local conditions though so check. All grades contain ethanol in my area.
 

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Has anyone ever encountered a problem starting a gasoline engine of any sort after a six-month period of storage? I certainly haven't with lawnmowers, weed wackers, and outboard motors. For a year or more I'd probably want to prepare for storage, but not for seasonal idleness. Some gasoline companies on their websites claim at least six months stability of their product with no additional additives.

But honestly, if you have to store your motorcycle for more than six months, you don't need Sta-Bil....you need to move to another climate zone.:green_lol:
 

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Why a rubber mat under the front tire? My tires are made of rubber.
Habit, mostly. Not sure if the mat is rubber, vinyl, or some synthetic concoction. For over winter storage I use something as a barrier between the tires and the concrete. Could be a complete waste of time and effort but it's what I do.

From Bridgestone's "Tire Doctor".

We would recommend the following steps in storing a vehicle:

1. Make sure the floor / ground surface is free of any petroleum product contamination (Oil, grease, fuel, etc.) since petroleum products will attack rubber and can cause significant damage to compound characteristics.

2. Thoroughly clean your tires with soap and water.

3. Place a barrier such as plastic, cardboard, or plywood between the tires and the ground surface.

4. Cover your tires to block out direct sunlight and ultra violet rays.

5. Do not store the vehicle in close proximity to steam pipes, electrical generators or animal manure since these accelerate oxidation of the rubber.

6. Make sure your tires are fully inflated with air.

7. When the vehicle is ready to go back into service, inspect the tires for excessive cracking in both the sidewall and tread area and check all tire air pressures. Tires will normally lose about 2 PSI per month so you should expect to find the pressures lower than when you put the vehicle into storage. Re-inflate the tires to the correct air pressure before operation.


YMMV
 

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Fun fact UV sunlight on Aluminum makes an Ozone generator

You need the tank full or sealed to avoid it breathing in moist air
 

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On bikes (andany of my small-engines) which are carberated, I turn off the fuel-petcock and run the carb-bowl dry *EVERY* time it is stored.

For my 2-stroke lawnmower and snowmobile, this means EVERY time it is stored between use.

With my Wee, there is no fuel-petcock so the best I can do is treat the fuel with stabilizer and store with full-tank.

I learned the hard way with rusted-out gastank on previous bikes because I did not fill the tank to the top. The condensation collected on the bottom of the tank all winter. Then the rust got sucked into the carberators. If you have ever pulled the carbs off a Honda V45 engine, you know it is EXTREMELY difficult task due to carbs being mounted between the cylinders.

As for ehtanol - Unfortunately the Federal government has mandated it....and the rules are changing to soon to add even more alcohol !!:jawdrop:

With this added alcohol older bikes actually need to be re-jetted else melted pistons may result. (I read this in recent "Motorcyclist" magazine)

Adding alcohol to gasoline has SO MANY drawbacks from attacking rubber, hygroscopic, leaning-out the mixture, plugging filters and even breaking-down quickly. I have seen some chainSaws which are only run a couple times a year get totally plugged-up. I have had to re-build many carburetors due to Alcohol in the fuel.
 

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Today's fuels start to deteriorate in as little as 2 weeks. The owners of carbureted bikes, atv's and sleds that aren't stored properly with treated fuel pay my mortgage.

Marine Sta-Bil has an ethanol neutralizing ingredient. Star-Tron works excellent as well and is what I use.

In climates where drastic temp extremes are common, moisture will form inside empty or partially filled fuel tanks from condensation. Metal tanks are susceptible to rusting from the condensation which is why it is common to store them full of fresh, treated fuel.
 

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I got religon when 1 spring I actually got almost a quart of water out of my lawn tractor tank. Now every tank is top up everytime.

Note if you don't understand, it is the heated AIR in the tank. That expands in the tank and leaves, then in the COOL time of the evening in contracts and sucks in cool moist air and the cycle pumping starts again.

So no air space to expand and contract then there is no breathing. If there is no temerature cycling then no problem like a heated basement
 
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