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Hi all,
I started riding in early 2016, and bought the 2007 Wee in June of that year. Used her as a daily driver/commuter ever since, and I'm up to 15k miles this month! Goddamn I love that bike.

I've surfed the forums searching for an answer, and think I have it, but want to confirm with y'all before I pull the trigger on the fix/replacement.

I've dropped my bike a few times, at slow-speed or no-speed, and no crashes, thankfully. But, I moved last year, and have had the strangest thing happening to me ever since. When I hit the starter, it sounds a bit like a modem connecting, where it used to be a flat, static sound. Additionally, above 75~80mph, I start getting deadband at the top of the throttle. I thought this was just the way of life, but never thought they could be related.

I've looked around and asked buddies about what that top deadband could be. I tried readjusting the throttle cables, tried using some fuel filter cleaner, etc.

But it only occurred to me this week that I didn't try replacing the fuel pump. When I flip on the pump before hitting the ignition it now always does the modem noise. Granted, it's been 6k miles since that fall, so it's clearly not a usability issue, only performance. But I'm starting to think that this is the most obvious, and likely culprit, given it sounds funny before I hit ignition, and the sound persists after I've started the engine.

I'm a bit hesitant to take on the task of replacing it, as it seems pretty intimidating to me, but I also wanna brap brap. Can anyone provide me with some encouragement (and possibly affirmation that this is the likely solution)? I've found working on the bike to be pretty easy, as I've replaced the spark plugs & air filter since buying, and of course doing regular oil changes and lubing the chain. I feel like changing the fuel pump should be easy, but the couple of threads I've found on it make it look pretty intimidating.


Thanks for any advice, encouragement, and/or berating. I really appreciate being able to read the forums for guidance, and I know y'all are a great group to be a part of.

Cheers,
Bungs
 

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You may not require a fuel pump replacement although replacing it isn't really that big a job. You very likely have some contamination restricting fuel flow within your fuel pump high pressure filter and suction screen. The cost of replacing the fuel pump is huge unless you can find a good used one. The cost of fixing the one you have is low if you have the ability and time to take on the project.

The first place to start is to do a "fuel pump flow test". Use the Google Custom Search box at the top right of this website to find out how to perform the flow test. If your pump fails the flow test (that is actually good news) then the next step is to again use the Google Custom Search for "fuel filter bypass". This is a relatively simple modification that will allow you to easily service the newly fitted external high pressure fuel filter at regular intervals.

The fuel filter bypass requires you to remove and dismantle the fuel pump and drill a small hole into the internal filter. It all looks intimidating but if you follow the instructions closely and take lots of pictures along the way you shouldn't have any problems completing the task. I've done it so I know you can too.
 

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Like Gdrew said. Did the filter bypass on mine following directions on this site and it gave back life to my Vee. Have been running it with an exterior fuel filter for 3 years and over 60,000 km no more fuel pump problems.
 

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I wouldn't bother with fuel pressure or flow tests because of the age of the bike (a K7 is now 13 years old!) and the symptoms you describe are consistent with filters being plugged. When the filters are plugged the pump starts to whine like that and the reduced flow causes the dead power band. The drops may have stirred up crap in the tank and then was sucked into the pump so here you are. When you have the tank off be sure to rinse it with fresh gas to get any crap out of the bottom so it does not plug up your new filters. Also, I would not do the HP filter bypass to save a few bucks unless you travel to places like Mexico that have sketchy gas. The OEM filters last for a long time if used in the States with quality gas so the bypass trick is really to make it easy to change the filter when you get bad gas in the wild.

Pulling the pump and replacing the parts is not a difficult job but there are some pitfalls. Pulling the tank and the fuel pump is not difficult, just tedious. There is an inlet filter + a regulator/filter that need to be replaced. To get to them you have to disassemble the pump without breaking anything. Getting the pump apart can be difficult because it takes a lot of force to pull it apart. Once it is apart installing the replacement filters and regulator and reassembly is easy if you take pictures to get the parts and wiring back where they belong.

Here is the math, a new pump from Suzuki costs $520 but to fix your old pump you need to replace the inlet strainer (item #2 $30) and the regulator (item #7 $120) which includes a high pressure filter so repair makes sense. If you paid someone to do this it would be pretty expensive but if you can DIY then you are looking at $150 in parts and a 2-3hrs of your labor. You could pull the fuel pump and rinse the tank yourself but take the pump and the replacement parts to an experienced mechanic who can probably swap out the parts in less than an hour if you didn't feel comfortable tearing into the pump. If you can find a mechanic who will let you watch and learn that would be ideal because you can see how these more complicated tasks are done and be more confident the next time some difficult part needs to be replaced.
 

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