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I'd be interested to hear what sort of fuel consumption other wee users are getting. I seem to get a pretty consistant 4.9 litres/100km but had hoped I'd get better than this. Mainly used for commuting with some longer runs thrown in at 110/120km/hr on the speedo (around 105km/hr I guess?), riding solo with a Givi top box, madstrad bracket up high and a laminar lip so I guess I've added to the wind resistance somewhat.

What is everyone else getting?

Cheers
C.
NZ, where the rugby world cup will be living from now on!
 

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4.47L/100km with 90% commuting [top box on].

I once managed to get 500km- 4L/100km out of a tank full with top box and panniers fully loaded on a trip [was really stressed on the last 50km leg in to the town].

The speedo's are usually about 10% off.
In other words, to travel at 80kph you can have the speedo showing 88kph- 90kph at 99kph showing- 100kph show 110kph on the speedo [very carefully checked multiple times on my GPS].
This is not exact on all Wee's but it seems very close to most.

I ride at 10% over everywhere except past fixed speed cameras, where I ride with the speedo showing the posted speed for the zone.

Although I have ridden past many police radar sites and mobile police radar cars I have never been stopped by the police.

Back to the fuel economy of the Wees, they are really good, with 22 litres on board they give a very useful touring range [I've gotta get off to stretch my legs long before the bike needs to stop :yikes: ].

Here is a useful link for doing your calculations.
MotorMouth - Fuel Prices and Petrol Prices Australia
 

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It's been beat to death before - but i am getting consistently 4.7l -5L /100km fuel consumption almost regardless how hard i rode it. I once managed 4.2L/100km. and yes i often wonder how people achieve consistently less than 4l/100kms

FYI, mine is K8 650 with a 45l topbox permantly mounted and about 8kgs of extra farkle being lug around.
 

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It's been beat to death before - but i am getting consistently 4.7l -5L /100km fuel consumption almost regardless how hard i rode it. I once managed 4.2L/100km. and yes i often wonder how people achieve consistently less than 4l/100kms

FYI, mine is K8 650 with a 45l topbox permantly mounted and about 8kgs of extra farkle being lug around.
Yep, not exactly a new topic :fineprint:

But every new owner likes to post that he/she is getting excellent fuel economy :yesnod:

Wait until it has over 45,000km on it, the fuel economy won't change much but the bike will get faster. :thumbup:
 

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I'd be interested to hear what sort of fuel consumption other wee users are getting. I seem to get a pretty consistant 4.9 litres/100km but had hoped I'd get better than this. Mainly used for commuting with some longer runs thrown in at 110/120km/hr on the speedo (around 105km/hr I guess?), riding solo with a Givi top box, madstrad bracket up high and a laminar lip so I guess I've added to the wind resistance somewhat.

What is everyone else getting?

Cheers
C.
NZ, where the rugby world cup will be living from now on!
Wally,don't be so silly,they haven't done the dance yet and the last time we met :mrgreen:your fuel economy is in the ballpark,welcome and be safe mate:yesnod:
 

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:p
It's been beat to death before - but i am getting consistently 4.7l -5L /100km fuel consumption almost regardless how hard i rode it. I once managed 4.2L/100km. and yes i often wonder how people achieve consistently less than 4l/100kms

FYI, mine is K8 650 with a 45l topbox permantly mounted and about 8kgs of extra farkle being lug around.
Poddling around in traffic at low revs will really blow your fuel consumption.
I get 25-30% worse economy going to work in Sydney than I do on the open road (even when riding agressively)


PS for the model police I declare that I am talking about my DL1000 (even tho it says so in my signature) :p
.
 

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Touring range

One of the great things about the DL650 is its touring range.:hurray: There aren't too many bikes on the market that will match it. On trips with panniers, tank bag ad rack loaded I get 23.5kms to the litre riding at 110kph on the speedo. If I ride unloaded this increases to about 26kms to the litre. On a ride recently when I was riding in the rain and being very careful it stretched to 28.5 kms to the litre. I've never gone much over 400kms before getting fuel but one of these days I intend to take some spare fuel with me and just see how far it will go before running out.
The problem with this range arises when you ride with others whose bikes only have 15 or 17 litre tanks, they have to stop evry 250kms or so for fuel,:headbang: this really stuffs up travel times on longer trips.
 

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One of the great things about the DL650 is its touring range.:hurray: There aren't too many bikes on the market that will match it. On trips with panniers, tank bag ad rack loaded I get 23.5kms to the litre riding at 110kph on the speedo. If I ride unloaded this increases to about 26kms to the litre. On a ride recently when I was riding in the rain and being very careful it stretched to 28.5 kms to the litre. I've never gone much over 400kms before getting fuel but one of these days I intend to take some spare fuel with me and just see how far it will go before running out.
The problem with this range arises when you ride with others whose bikes only have 15 or 17 litre tanks, they have to stop evry 250kms or so for fuel,:headbang: this really stuffs up travel times on longer trips.
Your right about riding with someone with a small tank. Every now and then a rider joins in on a long trip with us who has a Yamaha 750 cruiser,a silly bike, can't think of the name now but no matter. A small tank, compounded by poor fuel economy means it just can't make the second town for fuel. So it means he usually stops every bloody town for fuel. I won't go on those rides anymore or just ride my normal pace and wait for an hour or so at the end of the day for him to finally arrive. It gets everyones blood pressure to rise as he is totally unaware of the rest of the world. It has spoiled a few rides over the years but no more!
 

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There are so, so many variables. My recent 2000km trip varied from about 4l/100km( really - on PULP) to well over 5l/100km (sus fuel) over similar riding conditions. Even the temp of the petrol makes a marked difference...I filled up early one morning in Glen Innes (brrrrr) and got much better economy from that tank as I'm sure fuel expands significantly with inc. temp.
 

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There are so, so many variables. My recent 2000km trip varied from about 4l/100km( really - on PULP) to well over 5l/100km (sus fuel) over similar riding conditions. Even the temp of the petrol makes a marked difference...I filled up early one morning in Glen Innes (brrrrr) and got much better economy from that tank as I'm sure fuel expands significantly with inc. temp.
Engines perform better in cold air too, which helps the overall economy.
 

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Even the temp of the petrol makes a marked difference...I filled up early one morning in Glen Innes (brrrrr) and got much better economy from that tank as I'm sure fuel expands significantly with inc. temp.
Yes fuel will expand as it heats up (we used to cool fuel in dry ice back in the production racing days in the 1970s, saved a fuel stop during a 6 hour race) but in your situation that is not the case.
The fuel you purchased is stored in underground tanks and the temperature of the fuel in the tanks is consistent, it would take weeks of constant below freezing temps to cause any noticeable difference to the temp of the fuel underground.
As Ocker said the consumption decrease you experienced in this case would be due to the cool ambient temps not the temp of the fuel.
 

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Wind resistance

The factor that affects my bike's fuel consumption most adversely apart from speed is headwinds.:yikes: A really nasty headwind can make a significant difference to fuel consumption.
 

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The factor that affects my bike's fuel consumption most adversely apart from speed is headwinds.:yikes: A really nasty headwind can make a significant difference to fuel consumption.
:confused:
The factor that affects mine the most is the right hand twist grip.
:green_lol::green_lol:
 

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Yes fuel will expand as it heats up (we used to cool fuel in dry ice back in the production racing days in the 1970s, saved a fuel stop during a 6 hour race) .....
I saw a race at Mt. Gambier in the mid 1970s - the rider had ice packs on his tank right up to the last few sec on the starting line. Fell off second lap. Fuel heated/expanded at a greater rate than consumed, over-flow line was in front of the rear wheel!

That wasn't you was it kiwi?
 
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