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Discussion Starter #1
So it's dropped from 40 to around 0 Fahrenheit just north of NYC and I go to move the 2014 strom.from one side of street to other for alternate side parking and after a rain sleet snow mix cylinder is frozen. Tried oil, alcohol, but finally had to get the heat gun and throw an extension cord out my window and thaw out the lock to unlock steering to move it to the other side of street.

So the question is has anyone made a creative lock cover or should I just flood the cylinder with grease. I've oiled lock before to prevent this.... Sadly the bike needs to live outside. An enclosed garage would cost.me 200ish a month, not to mention it would be a half mile away and I do ride as long as it's above freezing....
 

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Lock cover. 1-2mm Rubber sheet and self adhesive double sided velcro. Cut to size so it'll just sit over the lock and be anchored down between the bars. Just lift it to slip the key in. Simple, easy to use and durable.

I've used that trick for years on numerous bikes - but for an immediate fix check out the plastic bottle caps you are throwing out, from memory some are just the right size to slip over the lock. (Can't remember which sorry).
 

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Bearing grease will freeze at 0f, so you run the risk of damage moving it at those temps. Get it to a spot you know is OK, then cover the entire bike until things thaw out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lock cover. 1-2mm Rubber sheet and self adhesive double sided velcro. Cut to size so it'll just sit over the lock and be anchored down between the bars. Just lift it to slip the key in. Simple, easy to use and durable.

I've used that trick for years on numerous bikes - but for an immediate fix check out the plastic bottle caps you are throwing out, from memory some are just the right size to slip over the lock.

(Can't remember which sorry).
Awesome, I will do the rubber cover...
 

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Unless it changed, there is a cover built into the lock. It may not be enough to keep actual downpour out but it might help. Look closely at the lock and the top portion may rotate covering the key slot. It does on my 2011 but then again mine is garaged and resides in New Mexico. Doesn't see much rain.
 

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I know about the metal slide. A couple of issues with it, first is it'll get water between it and the rest of the lock and freeze solid which leaves him where he is now, second it makes it really really hard to get the key into the lock.

The rubber flap on the other hand actually keeps water out of the lock area and it doesn't really get in the way. 'k, it'll get confused looks from dealer mechanics but even they eventually work it out.
 

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Bikes aren't made for this shit. You have to MacGyver. That's part of the appeal. It's the same reason you send probes to Mars (and other places). People like MacGyvering.
 

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Ethanol and isopropanol alcohol that destroy germs also lower the freezing point of water, and can melt the ice inside the lock. Squirt some in, and dip your key in it but do not force the lock.

Follow up with a good dose of WD40. The freezing point of WD-40 is -50 degrees F.

Overall though, you need to do something to keep the moisture out of the lock. I like Pete's suggestion of a plastic bottle top. Leaving the bike out in freezing rain must suck, and induce all manner of issues - especially ones like https://www.stromtrooper.com/v-strom-service-maintenance-questions-discussions/420153-dreaded-headlight-issues.html

I would also be tempted to spray WD40 around behind the headlights and as many connectors as I can see.
 
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