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Could the front wheel be hitting the fender when it warms up from expansion? Seems far fetched, but I can't imagine a reason the front would wear out faster than the rear.
 

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My front PR4 lasted 18,470 km (11,476 miles) before replacement with a Metzeler Roadtec 01 and it still had some life left.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
K so I'm in the minority, but others have had front go first....it's just never happened to me before. But also my first set of new rubber on the Strom... I feel like tires on my old versys lasted forever, granted I primarily used that bike as a NYC commuter and the would usually die to a screw, industrial staple, or road hazard before I ever got to wear them down.
 

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That's fairly typical for me on a DL650. It does handle well but I needed my weight well forward and I was sometimes sliding the front into corners under braking.

If you ride aggressively there isn't necessarily something wrong.
 

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That's fairly typical for me on a DL650. It does handle well but I needed my weight well forward and I was sometimes sliding the front into corners under braking.

If you ride aggressively there isn't necessarily something wrong.
Just making sure, do you brake in corners?
 

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... sliding the front into corners under braking...
Just making sure, do you brake in corners?
A bit of trail braking isn't a bad thing, and not scary at all with ABS.
I wore out the stock front Trail Wing in 6100 miles, while the rear went 8500. The replacement Metzler Tourance Next is at 7400 and looking good. Could be due to having a two ply tread and not so blocky tread pattern.
 

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Yeah.

Not all the way through the corner, but deep into the corner yes. Far deeper than a sportsbike rider will.
That's so dangerous :surprise: Worst case scenario i'll use the rear brake to modify my trajectory, but using the front brake when you're engaged in a turn is a huge no-no.
 

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Fronts seem to wear out first on many Michelin's. They are the only tires I have used that do this. The front Anakee III on my V2 is wearing faster than the rear although they are still high mileage tires. The front treads are a bit shallow new IMO. I am generally a minimal brake user and tend to get on the higher end of mileage on tires normally. I still really like them.
 

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That's so dangerous :surprise: Worst case scenario i'll use the rear brake to modify my trajectory, but using the front brake when you're engaged in a turn is a huge no-no.
It's not as dangerous as it seems, I'm braking late and hard and deep into the corner with very little or no lean, off the brakes, tip the bike, turn, start adding throttle progressively once the exit can be seen. Not the lines a sports bike rider would choose but it's a very fast way around a set of corners on a DL.

The only dangerous bit is that I'm closer to the outside edge of the road than is typical before I initiate the turn. On the other hand a DL with semi-knobbly tires doesn't automatically crash if the seal runs out and I've reduced the chances of becoming a hood ornament for oncoming traffic considerably.

IMHO skimming the apex of the corner which is the traditional 'fastest way round' is far more dangerous.
 

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It's not as dangerous as it seems, I'm braking late and hard and deep into the corner with very little or no lean, off the brakes, tip the bike, turn, start adding throttle progressively once the exit can be seen. Not the lines a sports bike rider would choose but it's a very fast way around a set of corners on a DL.

The only dangerous bit is that I'm closer to the outside edge of the road than is typical before I initiate the turn. On the other hand a DL with semi-knobbly tires doesn't automatically crash if the seal runs out and I've reduced the chances of becoming a hood ornament for oncoming traffic considerably.

IMHO skimming the apex of the corner which is the traditional 'fastest way round' is far more dangerous.
This explains a lot.

I'm more of a paced ride type of guy.
 

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Just replaced the original BW Front after 15K miles. Tread was smooth on the left which matches my normal trail braking left turn into work. Rear still looks good.
 

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I just got back from a several day trip to northern Kalifornia with a bunch of VFR riders, and my wife and I were two up on the big dirt bike (2015 V2). There were 5th and 6th gen VFR 800s , a couple of VFR 1200s, and a Triumph 800Xc thrown in for good measure (also two up with a former road racer at the helm). We kept pace and led the group on some runs, and suffice it to say, the pace was, ahem...spirited. The big Strom handled the task perfectly with the longer travel suspension soaking up the less than perfect surfaces that were frequently encountered. I found myself trail braking into corners deeper and deeper as the pace wicked up and I was in my groove. I too, used to believe that the majority if not all braking should be done prior to tipping the bike in. I'm glad I have been open minded to learning about trail braking and use the technique all the time now. It's actually a much safer way to ride and allows me more control, while at the same time riding faster. A former PNW road racer I got coaching from used to say ..."smooth is fast, and fast is smooth...", probably borrowed from someone he learned from. That is what trail braking does for me...smooth. On the Strom, I use both the front and rear brake together in varying amounts to keep the brake dive to a minimum and keep the chassis settled. When people get nervous or condemn trail braking, I think they don't really understand what is going on. The braking at maximum lean angle is really quite light as it has gradually "trailed off" to nothing. The thing I really like about it is that the brake pads are already in constant contact with the rotors and there is little to no "panic braking" to be had if the corner conditions deteriorate and corrections are needed. If you haven't learned about it or tried it, you might give it a go. I'm glad I did...
 
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