StromTrooper banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, despite several Google searches I can't find this how to tutorial for my 2014 Vee.

I hope you can point me in the right direction.

Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,218 Posts
It is really a simple procedure.

- Bike on center stand
- Remove front sprocket cover
- Fit a socket onto a breaker bar and put it on the front sprocket bolt, bar facing forwards
- Climb on bike, right foot on rear brake, left foot on breaker bar, push down until bolt loosens
- Loosen rear axle bolt and loosen the chain adjusting bolts on either side of swing arm to let the chain go slack
- Remove front sprocket bolt and washer, then slip chain off sprocket.
- Remove sprocket and replace.
- Put chain back on front sprocket
- Tighten the chain from swingarm adjustment bolts, keep it loose for now
- Front sprocket bolt needs red loctite, put washer and bolt on front sprocket
- Use torque wrench when tightening, same procedure as removal, climb on bike, right foot on brake, torque wrench on bolt with arm forward, reach down and pull UP on it until it clicks, do the click a few times. I have been using 83 ft/lbs
- Adjust chain to correct tension
- Front sprocket cover back on and your done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
It is really a simple procedure.

- Bike on center stand
- Remove front sprocket cover
- Fit a socket onto a breaker bar and put it on the front sprocket bolt, bar facing forwards
- Climb on bike, right foot on rear brake, left foot on breaker bar, push down until bolt loosens
- Loosen rear axle bolt and loosen the chain adjusting bolts on either side of swing arm to let the chain go slack
- Remove front sprocket bolt and washer, then slip chain off sprocket.
- Remove sprocket and replace.
- Put chain back on front sprocket
- Tighten the chain from swingarm adjustment bolts, keep it loose for now
- Front sprocket bolt needs red loctite, put washer and bolt on front sprocket
- Use torque wrench when tightening, same procedure as removal, climb on bike, right foot on brake, torque wrench on bolt with arm forward, reach down and pull UP on it until it clicks, do the click a few times. I have been using 83 ft/lbs
- Adjust chain to correct tension
- Front sprocket cover back on and your done.
Does Suzuki really call for RED loctite there?:bom_ears:

Sounds pretty permanent to me......

The weird thing is on the DR650 there are 3 short little 12 mm bolts that attach the sprocket to a cheap metal retaining plate and the sprocket basically floats on the spline aligning itself with the rear sprocket. It works fine, has never been reported to fail on DR websites and you can change it with a 1/4 inch socket on the side of the road in 15 minutes.

I wonder why the Vstrom is such a heavy assembly (like many other 650's as well : KLR, BMW, ...?)?

...................shu

(just realized you're talking about the DL 1000 not the 650. Still I have the same questions.....shu)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,218 Posts
The red loctite comes off with a breaker bar, no problems. The 650 has a flange that you bend over to keep the bolt from coming off, but the 1000 doesn't, so you need the Red stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I am a red seal millwright and automotive mechanic and any red loctite I have used u will not break it loose without heat. If u do usually threads are wrecked or something bad happens. I can see using blue and cleaning threads of grease so that the loctite will hold. At trade school it is taught that you need heat to loose red loctite. I would not use it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,218 Posts
This is what the manual says to use

99000-32030 1303 THREADLOCK $5.03

This is 1303B

A description of this is

1303 - hi strength, infrequent removal

1322 - med strength stud & bearing

1342 - low strength, frequent removal

1360 - hi temp

Looks like Red to me? What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
Looks like red. I used blue though. I changed 4 of them (about 20,000 miles each) and none loosened. Red can be a beatch to remove and require heat like mentioned.

Tricky part is getting the clutch slave off, watch the spacers on slave and ignore book and do not tie clutch handle down...instead use something to keep slave piston from easing out....like a socket taped over piston.

Search forum for step by step instructions.....ignore clutch handle tie down....YES, I said that twice.

The previous instructions in post 2 look to me to be for a wee. The 1000 has a hydraulic clutch to contend with. Look for a tutorial that describes the slave cylinder removal/reinstall process or you might be sorryeeee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
In the post describing how to change it, it was specifically said to use red loctite. Red loctite is 263 on the loctite site. If you read the PDF for it from the loctite site for red loctite 263 it is quoted as saying for disassembly " apply localized heat to nut or bolt to approximately 250 degrees C. Disassemble while hot. The part number given is from Suzuki for a different brand of thread lock with different properties. We do not want to use a brand name generically and possibly confuse members as what to use and cause serious problems. As follows is the link to the loctite PDF for 263. https://tds.us.henkel.com/NA/UT/HNAUTTDS.nsf/web/382795AAF2B4355B8525760E004BEA0A/$File/263-EN.pdf.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
Blue loctite works fine. No one has ever reported the nut getting loose with blue loctite.

I rig a preventer strap that pulls the centerstand forward. I do not want to pull too hard on a wrench and pull the bike back so the centerstand folds.

I put a stick between the swingarm and a wheel spoke to hold the wheel in place while I'm breaking the nut loose or torquing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
When I did mine, no jumping on a breaker bar would loosen that nut (new from the factory), but an impact wrench spun it right off. I've also heard, and it seems reasonable, that it's a bad idea to use the transmission to hold the shaft so you want it in neutral for the work, especially if using an impact. Next time I change it I'll find out if red loctite was a bad idea.

Not to be contrary, but for removing the slave I've used both methods - cable tieing the lever, and cable tieing the piston and they both worked for me. Strapping the lever down seems counter-intuitive, but it locks the piston in place to keep it from popping all the way out. This is the method recommended in the FSM.

It was mentioned above, but don't forget that long metal spacer on one of the clutch slave bolts; you can break something re-installing if it's not there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,843 Posts
This is what the manual says to use

99000-32030 1303 THREADLOCK $5.03

This is 1303B

A description of this is

1303 - hi strength, infrequent removal

1322 - med strength stud & bearing

1342 - low strength, frequent removal

1360 - hi temp

Looks like Red to me? What do you think?
I found this document from Loctite. Down on page 7 it claims that their 271 (Red) threadlocker is equivalent to Suzuki 99000-32030 (1303). Of course, that's not to imply they are exactly the same thing, but probably as close as you will get outside of the Suzuki product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Loctite also says for disassembly of 271 to heat to 250 C and disassembly hot. It is a military spec loctite and requires clean threads.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top