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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a used V-Strom 1000. It's got 24,000 km or around 14,000 miles on it.

The previous owner had it serviced before I purchased it. However, since I've owned it now for a couple of weeks I've noticed a rather harsh shuddering under braking, particularly heavy braking.

Just wondering if this is a natural occurance for this beast. If not is it a common problem? It can be either brake pads, warped discs or head stem bearing adjustment/wear.
 

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With 14K on those brake pads, they "may" be pretty worn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Heavy braking? Does it have ABS? If it does perhaps it's engaging.
No, not that. I lightly squeeze the lever and you can feel back through it.

In any case, I've already tested the ABS out. It's nothing like this.
 

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No, not that. I lightly squeeze the lever and you can feel back through it.



In any case, I've already tested the ABS out. It's nothing like this.


Sounds like you have a warped disc, or pad build up on disc. Try scrubbing disc with a scotch Brite pad.
Yes I agree. Does the wear on the discs look uniform? If your disc is warped you might see an area of the disc that isnt as worn as the rest.
 

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No, not that. I lightly squeeze the lever and you can feel back through it.

In any case, I've already tested the ABS out. It's nothing like this.
Very high probability that it simply has brake pad material stuck to the rotors. It builds up and forms "waves" like whoops on a motoX track. It is hard to scrub off. There is no magic chemical. But with enough elbow and Scotch Brite they will return to new.

Someone will tell you that you have warped rotors. Nearly impossible on a modern Japanese street bike. Don't accept that diagnosis easily. Don't have the rotors "turned". Just clean them.

Sorry if I sound a bit strident ... it can be avoided if the brake pads are allowed to cool down for the last mile or two before you park it. If for some reason you can't cool them, at least try to avoid clamping the front brake as you park. That is the point where the material gets bonded to the rotor.
 

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I use my front brake more than my rear and just switched out my front pads at 24k km, they did not need to be switched yet, I could have gone another 10k km on them easily.

This video is good showing how easy maintenance is on these, you could pull the pads out, clean the whole thing out with a toothbrush, and apply some high temp grease, that might clear up your issues.

Another thing to do is get the front wheel off the ground, and give it a spin to see if the rotors are warped or lumpy.

 

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If your disc is warped your brake lever will also pulse as the calliper cylinder moves in and out.
 
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If you do take the brake pads out for inspection machine them flat again by finding a nice flat piece of concrete path and buff the pad material using a circular motion.
Warning - using a piece of concrete often walked by your loving partner may result in domestic disharmony.
 

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Very high probability that it simply has brake pad material stuck to the rotors. It builds up and forms "waves" like whoops on a motoX track. It is hard to scrub off. There is no magic chemical. But with enough elbow and Scotch Brite they will return to new.

Someone will tell you that you have warped rotors. Nearly impossible on a modern Japanese street bike. Don't accept that diagnosis easily. Don't have the rotors "turned". Just clean them.

Sorry if I sound a bit strident ... it can be avoided if the brake pads are allowed to cool down for the last mile or two before you park it. If for some reason you can't cool them, at least try to avoid clamping the front brake as you park. That is the point where the material gets bonded to the rotor.
I agree warped rotors are unlikely. Cleaning, thorough cleaning, will probably fix it. In a worse case scenario you might want to take the rotors off and have them bead blasted. I would recommend new pads after the cleaning, then go out and bed the pads by doing 7-8 hard stops from 45 down to still rolling. Do not come to a complete stop. If you must stop use the rear brake to complete the stop. Ride a few minutes to let the brakes cool and then do 4 more stops. Your brakes should be bedded and your lever pulse free. Try to avoid holding your front brake at stop lights, especially after hard use.
 

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If you do take the brake pads out for inspection machine them flat again by finding a nice flat piece of concrete path and buff the pad material using a circular motion.
Warning - using a piece of concrete often walked by your loving partner may result in domestic disharmony.
Or better yet, get a small pane of glass, put some tacks around the outside of the glass to hold it onto a slightly bigger piece of wood. Then put a bit of sand paper on the glass surface & rub the brake pad in a figure of eight pattern. Gives a much nicer flat finish to the pad. I do this every time I pull the wheel out.
A bit anal but never had an issue with pulsing brakes.
PS. as stated later in this thread, run your brakes in properly helps too!
 
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