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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I had to get a longer Galfer SS front break line because I wanted to put some GenMar risers on my 08 ABS Wee. Long story short when I had finished the job I had handle bars that were way more comfortable but no front brakes. I've tried to bleed the air out as the manual says, but there is just no pressure in the new brake line at all. I guess I'm taking it in to the local stealership tomorrow. If anybody has any ideas I'd love to hear them, cuz I won't get much information out of the stealership. TIA
Bob
 

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You've got air in the system. If all you did was replace the line and fill the reservoir, keep pumping that brake lever. It may take an hour, working the lever several times and then waiting.

Of course, there is a proper way to bleed the air out of hydraulic brakes, but the above method will work. Use google to find out how bleeding works.
 

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You've got air in the system. If all you did was replace the line and fill the reservoir, keep pumping that brake lever. It may take an hour, working the lever several times and then waiting.

Of course, there is a proper way to bleed the air out of hydraulic brakes, but the above method will work. Use google to find out how bleeding works.


:) The trick is to fill the reservoir, as described, and hold the brake lever in as you crack the bleeder valve, You need a clear tube on you bleeder hose and an 8mm wrench to do this,

As you crack the bleeder with the brake lever pulled in you will see the pressure release, so be prepared to close the bleeder quickly, and then pump the brake lever again until you rebuild the pressure, and release the bleeder, and close,

As you repeat this process, watch the reservoir, so that it does not empty.

This is easiest with a helper, But it will get the job done fairly quickly,

Soon you will see fluid with air bubbles in the clear hose, you are almost done now,

Keep the reservoir full to the full line, Pump the lever, and hold the lever tight while you release the bleeder, and your fluid should now flow out, You have created the vacuum, so watch the clear tube for no air and the reservoir so it does not run dry, and close the bleeder when you see no bubbles or the reservoir gets low. Repeat if necessary.

Now, get a Strong elastic or strap and use it to hold your brake on tight with the reservoir lid off for a few minutes while you tidy up. Any air left will rise under the pressure and vent through the open reservoir. Place the cap back on tight with the rubber band or strap, holding your brake lever tight, and leave it on until you are ready to go. Your front brakes should be pumped up.

This can usually be done faster, than it took me to describe the process,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Abs???

Blair and tmmcgee,
Thanks for the replys. I have been trying to do as you suggest, but with no success. I think this may be because I have an ABS system, or perhaps I just haven't done it long enough...that's the problem, but I guess I'll go back at it since the dealer can't help me until Thursday. Thanks again for the help.
Bob
 

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SV Racing Parts, Gen Mar Handle Bar Risers, and SS Brake Lines

:) Hi Bob, the abs has a quasi braided line whereas the non-abs has a rubber line slightly longer,

I am working to get the correct length of the abs upper line, Once we know that, you can get a Stainless Steel line for that part at least and get your Gen Mar Handle Bar Risers to work,

I am working with Galfer right now on some pricing for SV Racing Parts for a SS set for the front and rear brake lines for our Vstrom bikes, :cool:

I will posting up the results as soon as I get them,

Thanks for the support, I appreciate it,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair




Blair and tmmcgee,
Thanks for the replies. I have been trying to do as you suggest, but with no success. I think this may be because I have an ABS system, or perhaps I just haven't done it long enough...that's the problem, but I guess I'll go back at it since the dealer can't help me until Thursday. Thanks again for the help.
Bob
 

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Blair and tmmcgee,
Thanks for the replys. I have been trying to do as you suggest, but with no success. I think this may be because I have an ABS system, or perhaps I just haven't done it long enough...that's the problem, but I guess I'll go back at it since the dealer can't help me until Thursday. Thanks again for the help.
Bob
Just got word my wife's ABS will be in later this week, so I'm going to be doing the brake line soon. I already have the risers standing-by. I'll be very interested to see what you learn when you go back at it. Please do keep us informed.
 

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Blair and tmmcgee,
Thanks for the replys. I have been trying to do as you suggest, but with no success. I think this may be because I have an ABS system, or perhaps I just haven't done it long enough...that's the problem, but I guess I'll go back at it since the dealer can't help me until Thursday. Thanks again for the help.
Bob
ABS and non-ABS bleed the same way. Hold the brake lever in for several seconds and then pump. Repeat. Not having the parts to do a proper bleed when I did this job, I eventually got the air out after an hour or so.

With the top off the reservoir, you should be able to see air bubbling up when you work the lever. Sometimes only a single bubble. Keep at it.

There are a lot of how-to's out there. I like the first picture in this one. The method directly applies to the Vstrom. http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/how_to/4213448.html
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Makes sense...

Tom,
Thanks a bunch for updating your post. Now that I know all I need to do is stick with it and buy some clear tubing, that's what I'll do. Unfortunately I'll be working long hours for the next 2 days so it may be Thursday before I can report back to you guys.
Blair,
The parts guy at Suzuki measured my stock line and ordered a 22" custom SS from Galfer. The stock line turned out to be just shy of 18". I have a bunch of extra with this 4" extension :bom_furious3:, so I would recommend to all of you guys with ABS to go no more than a 21" line. I think 20" would work, but I'm not sure about that. 21" will work for sure. Thanks again for all the help and encouragement.
Cheers,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Got Brakes!

Tom,
Yup. That's the information I needed. I made yet another trip to the hardware store and got the tubing. It did take an hour and I know I didn't get all the air out, cuz they're a little spongy but I got brakes now. I thought I'd take a ride on Thursday then bleed em again and maybe that stubborn little air bubble will surface this time. Thanks again for the advice.
Cheers,
Bob
PS I had an air leak down at the tree (lower connection for the Galfer) There are 2 banjo fittings there that have to be bolted in. The new Galfer and the stock Suzuki behind it. Use the stock Suzuki washer as the last washer you put on that bolt before you put it together. The copper washer that Galfer sent didn't seal well enough in that spot though I did use them everywhere else. Hope that helps for those of you getting ready to do this project.
Bob
 

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Now, get a Strong elastic or strap and use it to hold your brake on tight with the reservoir lid off for a few hours. Any air left will rise under the pressure and vent through the open reservoir,
No, no, no, never ever leave the reservoir lid off for any longer than necessary. That is potentially life threatening

Brake fluid is hydrophilic it very easily and readily absorbs water or moisture from the atmosphere. When it absorbs moisture it causes the boiling pint of the fluid to drop considerably this in turn means the fluid will overheat and cause loss of brake pressure with sometimes even mild applications of the brakes under repeated normal stopping conditions.
Always leave your reservoirs sealed as long as possible and never use brake fluid from a container that has been previously opened and then resealed.
This is your life that you are playing with, the cost of brake fluid is a small price to pay.
 

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Tom,
Yup. That's the information I needed. I made yet another trip to the hardware store and got the tubing. It did take an hour and I know I didn't get all the air out, cuz they're a little spongy but I got brakes now. I thought I'd take a ride on Thursday then bleed em again and maybe that stubborn little air bubble will surface this time. Thanks again for the advice.
Cheers,
Bob
PS I had an air leak down at the tree (lower connection for the Galfer) There are 2 banjo fittings there that have to be bolted in. The new Galfer and the stock Suzuki behind it. Use the stock Suzuki washer as the last washer you put on that bolt before you put it together. The copper washer that Galfer sent didn't seal well enough in that spot though I did use them everywhere else. Hope that helps for those of you getting ready to do this project.
Bob
Good to know, thanks for the info. Will be tackling this sometime in June.
 

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Good to know, thanks for the info. Will be tackling this sometime in June.
:) Mark Tanner, in Australia reports that a 2 inch extension is absolutely adequate for the line that you need to replace for the abs fitted bikes to work out.

So your estimate that the 20" line will work is correct.

The thing about brake lines that are too long is that they make it tough to run the lines where you want, and for them to fit properly, since they don't bend and tuck away easily,

I've had a lot of experience with this on race bikes, when clip on bars are added or lowered,

As for the imminent danger of having your reservoir open, while you bleed your brakes, Don't worry, it does not absorb water and drop its boiling point that quickly, especially if you are working with synthetic.

If it happened that fast there would be a lot of racers in real trouble because that is the trick they commonly use to get the the last of the air out,

I wouldn't recommend you leave the top off for extended periods, and I am amending my initial post where I may have suggested a longer period than I intended.

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
 

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:) I wouldn't recommend you leave the top off for extended periods, and I am amending my initial post where I may have suggested a longer period than I intended.

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
A few minutes is fine what I was concerned about in your first post was somebody taking your advice then either deliberately or accidentally leaving the lid off all night for example with the bike in the garage while it was raining outside or the weather was humid.
 

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SV Racing Parts, Gen Mar Handle Bar Risers, and SS Brake Lines

A few minutes is fine what I was concerned about in your first post was somebody taking your advice then either deliberately or accidentally leaving the lid off all night for example with the bike in the garage while it was raining outside or the weather was humid.

:) I hear you brother, high humidity environments are exactly the situations where I would keep the cap handy, and ready to screw onto both the reservoir and the brake fluid bottle

Are you still off roading your VStrom? :D Last I saw it, you looked like you were having the time of your life riding in the rough stuff, :cool:

Hope all is well on your end of the world,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
 

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I ordered a 20" Galfer brake line from cyclebrakes.com and it was plenty long for the genmar up & back on my '07 ABS. I ordered the brake line on Monday and received it on Thursday so that was good. However, they did not orient the banjos like I requested and twisting them was difficult. It wouldn't have taken them 2 seconds extra to put the banjos on properly.

Bleeding the brakes did take some time and I appreciate the posts about that as it really helped me.

Riding with the genmars made me feel more in control of the bike. It does put your mirrors pretty close to you so you have to turn your head more to check them. I have extended my mirrors 2" using the homemade method I learned from another stromtrooper: 3/8 aluminum rod and epoxy. It really works.
 

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SV Racing Parts, Gen Mar Handle Bar Risers, and SS Brake Lines

:) As many already know I spent a ton of time with Galfer last week getting ,The SV Racing Parts, SS Front Brake Line for the DL650 abs package set up, and it has been shipping, starting today with the first recipients, having theirs sent to them today,

I Shipped an extra banjo to the first four buyers that I shipped a brake line kit to today,

That is because we know the top banjo bolt is coarse, and Common Sense would indicate that the lower banjo bolt should also be course, but Suzuki sometimes does funny things, so I included both a fine and a coarse lower double banjo bolt,

I need to have it confirmed to me which it is with the lower bolt, coarse or fine, the first person who removes the bolt from the splitter needs to email me to tell me which bolt to ship to everyone else with their DL650 abs SS Front Brake Line kits. Thanks for the help,

[email protected]

The kits are in stock and ready to ship right away. They include all the washers and banjo bolt fittings you will need, in SS Black to match the OEM cable, $49.95 and $7.95 Flat Rate Shipping, USPS Priority anywhere in the USA.

Below is a recap of a post I did earlier that outlines the process to bleed the lines, and replace the upper SS Front Brake Line for the DL650 abs.

You will need to bleed your front brake at least below the level of the splitter.

If you have no experience in bleeding brake lines you may want to enlist the help of someone who has.

Here is an idea of what it takes, if you get the tool I describe it goes quick, if you have a friend who has done it, use that friend,

It is not particularly difficult with the right tools which need to include a 8mm box end wrench and a possible assortment of open end wrenches in the 10 to 14 mm sizes for the banjo bolts,

You will also need some clear tubing and a catch jar, or a trip to pep boys or Shucks, or some similar automotive store where you can buy an inexpensive plastic catch can setup that will come with a lid and its own clear tubes, it is designed to act as siphon and will suck the brake fluid as you pump or hold pressure on the front brake lever,

The 8mm box end is to crack open and close the brake bleeder on your caliper, pick one side to work from that is comfortable for you, enlist a friend to help if you can,

I use the caliper on the right since it is closest to the brake lever, Pump up the brake lever, hold the pressures, crack the brake bleeder open with the 8mm using the box end on it, and let the brake fluid run into the vacuum of the catch can,

As you lose pressure, close the bleeder, re-pump the brake, and release the bleeder again to it run out into the catch can,

The splitter is the equalizer, watch the reservoir, do not open it yet, and when you get bubbles, and then you get air, instead of fluid, the one leg, and Splitter will be basically empty,

Keep brake cleaner handy to spray on any brake fluid spills, have the recommended fluid handy, look in your manual,

Have highly absorbent rags handy and pack and place anywhere you think a spill or drip might go, including around the brake master cylinder and the splitter,

Hold your line up to where it will run, you can rotate, to a degree the SS Brake line ends by placing a 10mm rod or pen in the fitting end and rotating it gently to make your connection angles more natural. Do not force the fitting too much,

Now you can disconnect one end, I suggest the top and hold it up and plug it with absorbent tissue or rag and use a zip tie or string to tie it pointing up it does not leak on your bike,

Hook up the new line, now with your rags handy to catch any spill, disconnect the lower and set it aside, and hook up the lower connection. Make sure is good and snug, no leaks, and not gorilla tight,

Reasonably spray down with brake cleaner or other solution to prevent any damage from brake fluid,

remove cap from reservoir, fill reservoir, but not to the top or close,

Have 8mm and catch can ready again,, By now you should have emptied it and ready to start fresh,

Pump up brake, hold and crack and reseal brake bleeder with 8mm until you have flow, at first what seems like nothing, and then air will come but eventually you will get the flow, when no more bubbles, seal bleeder, and go to other caliper, and suck it until you have fresh brake fluid and no bubbles coming,

Close up, bleeder, clean up and done,

It sounds like more than it is once you catch on, and you really should be able to do your own brake fluid at some point as an owner, This is everyone's chance to learn if they are ready for it,

Thanks and best regards,
Blair
 

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I'm reviving this old thread as I'm thinking of installing Galfer SS brake lines at some point in the next few months. I've done the brakes on my car, including bleeding, and I've helped to bleed the brakes on my VTX. So, I have a question about the process above, or rather what would be wrong with the following process.

1. Open brake master cylinder and suction out the old brake fluid as much as you can (turkey baster, etc.). Try to avoid touching the brake lever at this time.

2. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid to the max line.

3. Disconnect brake line from the master cylinder and plug the hole with a rubber stopper (not sure what size this would be).

4. Disconnect brake line from calipers.

5. Attach new brake line to calipers.

6. Attach new brake line to master cylinder by removing the rubber stopper and attaching the line. This has to be done quickly and carefully, as fluid will spill and you don't want to empty the master cylinder by letting it drain out.

7. Refill master cylinder and do the normal brake bleeding with the a suction pump at the bleeder valve, or the brake lever pump method (as described above).

I think it's important to avoid completely emptying the master cylinder. If you keep it filled with fluid throughout the process, you will avoid getting air trapped in the master cylinder pump. Since you suction out the old fluid first, only new fluid will be pushed through the pump after that and during the brake bleeding.

Thoughts?
 

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I think your procedure needlessly complicates things. When I did my SS lines, I completely drained the system before I took the old lines off by opening the bleeders and pumping the brake lever until no more fluid came out. After I swapped the lines, I filled the resivoir with new fluid and used a Mity Vac pump to draw fluid down the lines and into the calipers. I then finished the job by bleeding in pretty much the same way Blair recommends - pump the lever to build up pressure then crack a bleeder open, and repeat until bubbles stop coming out and repeated pumping doesn't make the lever any firmer. Do this for both calipers.
 

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:) Hi Bob, the abs has a quasi braided line whereas the non-abs has a rubber line slightly longer,

I am working to get the correct length of the abs upper line, Once we know that, you can get a Stainless Steel line for that part at least and get your Gen Mar Handle Bar Risers to work,

I am working with Galfer right now on some pricing for SV Racing Parts for a SS set for the front and rear brake lines for our Vstrom bikes, :cool:

I will posting up the results as soon as I get them,

Thanks for the support, I appreciate it,

Enjoy the ride, and best regards,
Blair
Great, hopefully my 09 ABS will come in some day and I'm thinking a SS brake line makes a lot of sense for the front. I'll have stock bars.
 

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After I replace the ft lines on my ABS I found it much easier to use a pressure bleeder. I tried the lever pump, I tried the vacuum, but neither of them worked as well as the pressure bleeder. I think the long brake lines and the ABS pump make leave lots of places for air to get trapped. unlike a vac pump or lever squeeze the pressure allowes you to push fluid continiously through the line. This method picks up lost of trapped air bubbles and carries them through the line without giving them a chance to rest. The pressue also make the bubbles sightly smaller to they move faster.

I made my bleeder several years ago for about $30.
 
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