StromTrooper banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Noticed that my brake resovoir was a bit lower and the front brakes a bit spongey. So, we bled both front calipers and now we notice a slow leak/seep at the bleed screws letting air into the system. We snugged it closed as usual on many bikes. What's t the fix to this? Common problem with DL650? Anyone know the torque setting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
If there is little or no damage to the threads, remove the nipple and put a dab of pipe joint compound on the nipple threads to seal the threads, and it'll be soft the next time you need to loosen the bleed nipple for the next bleeding (hold a finger over the hole to keep the fluid in the brake). If there is damage to the threads of the nipple, you can buy a replacement at an auto parts store or try the nipples with the check valve inside, the Speed Bleeder.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
Suzuki says 5.5lb-ft on the front bleeders and 4.3lb-ft on the rear. The banjo bolts use 16.5lb-ft. Those hollow bolts are one place I always use a torque wrench. My hands are educated for solid bolts and I have sheared hollow ones before.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If there is little or no damage to the threads, remove the nipple and put a dab of pipe joint compound on the nipple threads to seal the threads, and it'll be soft the next time you need to loosen the bleed nipple for the next bleeding (hold a finger over the hole to keep the fluid in the brake). If there is damage to the threads of the nipple, you can buy a replacement at an auto parts store or try the nipples with the check valve inside, the Speed Bleeder.
No damage to the threads, although based on GW specs, I may have overtightened them. When i pump the lever, the fluid seeps up through the threads.

Are bleeder screws universal? Can I really pick them up at an auto store?

Thanks,
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
The fronts are the same size as my Toyota.
Fronts-M7 X 1.0
Rear-
M8 X 1.25
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The fronts are the same size as my Toyota.
Fronts-M7 X 1.0
Rear-
M8 X 1.25
GW, I'm going to try to attache a pic of the bleed screw I need. You can see the fluid leaking up from the caliper onto the thread.
Are there any o-rings involved that may have been disturbed while bleeding? I am not comfortable using tape or anything on the thread, since it was not originally dont that way. Do you know the suzu part#'s involved?

So far, looks like I have to be down riding for a week just to find a screw.

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
The part number is 59121-18410 but any M7x1.0 bleed screw will work. It's hard to know exactly what happened there. It could be under tightened. It could have been over tightened and thread damage done. It may be some fluid gathered there from the work done. Spray some brake cleaner there and dry the area. Then see if using the brake brings up more fluid. There are no O-rings. Speedbleeders come with sealant applied to prevent air from escaping when loosened and bleeding.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The part number is 59121-18410 but any M7x1.0 bleed screw will work. It's hard to know exactly what happened there. It could be under tightened. It could have been over tightened and thread damage done. It may be some fluid gathered there from the work done. Spray some brake cleaner there and dry the area. Then see if using the brake brings up more fluid. There are no O-rings. Speedbleeders come with sealant applied to prevent air from escaping when loosened and bleeding.
My guess is overtightened, which should not damage the threads or can it? I'm not sure how this screw seats.

I did clean and wait a few hours and found that applying the lever starts the leak again. Can you bring me up to speed on the speedbleeders? What sealant can be used here if there is some thread damage?

I found stock screws at a dealer for $7.99 ea

Thanks,
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
Overtightening means thread damage or seat damage. Otherwise, it wasn't overtightened. Take the bleeder out and see if the conical end is scored or if aluminum is deposited on the threads. If there is aluminum, the hole has to be re-tapped. If the bleed screw conical end is damaged, a new one may fix the problem. A bleed screw repair kit is pictured. The top screw is just like the original. The conical end seals the hole in the caliper. Did you try a torque wrench? A proper inch-lb one set at 66inch-lbs is what I'd try next. A little too loose would explain everything. See Speed Bleeder Bleeding Brakes Bleeding Motorcycle Brakes Automotive Bleeder Screw Brake Bleeder but I'd want the conical end to do a proper job rather than relying on thread sealant.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Read this on the ADV forum

Do I need to apply lock tight? If so, red or blue?

ALSO be aware that the stock 'nipples' had lock tight on the threads... This old lock tight needs to be throughly cleaned off of the threads and then more lock tight added before just re-inserting them... Brakes are finicky that way... if given any possible way for fluid under very high pressure to find a way out, it will.

Does the manual say anything about using lock tight?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
Do not use Loctite. If brake fluid is making it to the threads, something is wrong with the cone end to hole seal. The stock bleeders do not have Loctite on them. If you aren't willing to do anything else I've mentioned, use Teflon tape. The best solution is to fix the seal area though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
No, I'm listening. Got the torque wrench, new bleed screws, and plan on pulling them and doing a through inspection/cleaning and tightening. I agree, the screws must not be setting correctly.

Thanks again

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
I'm not a fan of teflon tape. It reduces the friction so overtightening is even easier. If the threaded part is removed then reinstalled, bits of teflon tape can be pushed inside. And sometimes it just doesn't seal well enough. I prefer a paste pipe thread compound...stays soft and seals well. Just a small dab on the male threads is all that is needed. I use the pipe dope even when not leaking so I can use the vacuum bleeder without sucking in air.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
I'll agree. Pipe dope can be a last resort but I'd rather get the thing to properly seat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Update on this

So, I purchased two new bleeder screws at a dealer on the way home. Tech said no loctite is used for these screws. So, one side at a time, I removed the original screws, let some fluid wash out the caliper, and hand tightened the new one in place. Repeat for other caliper. Both old screw threads looked fine.

My 3/8" torque wrench has a low setting of 10, so I was out of luck on that. We slowly bled each side three pulls, and snugged them down as usual and cleaned the area with brake parts cleaner. Rotor as well.

It looked good, so off for a few mile test ride. Clean when I got back, but fifteen minutes later had the leak again on one side. Cleaned the fluid off, pumped the brake handle a few times and no more leak. Still clean this am.

I plan on another short ride this evening, keeping an eye out for any leaks. It's over 100 degrees here, so any residual fluid should dry quickley, and maybe help heat and set the screws.

This is still sort of a mystery to us, and we have worked on bikes doing basic maint like this for years. New calipers I guess are next if I have continued problems.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
377 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Suzuki says 5.5lb-ft on the front bleeders and 4.3lb-ft on the rear. The banjo bolts use 16.5lb-ft. Those hollow bolts are one place I always use a torque wrench. My hands are educated for solid bolts and I have sheared hollow ones before.
GW, where can I get a torque wrench that goes as low as 5 ft lb?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
GW, where can I get a torque wrench that goes as low as 5 ft lb?
Sears also has a Craftsman brand 3/8 drive inch-pound torque wrench. I use it on small bits on motos as well as my bicycles. Aluminum and carbon fiber don't like to be overtorqued, and EVERYTHING on road bicycles is small screws into alu or CF nowadays.

Edit: This one

http://www.craftsman.com/shc/s/p_10155_12602_00944593000P?vName=Hand+Tools&cName=Wrenches&sName=Torque+Wrenches&prdNo=11&blockNo=11&blockType=L11

 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top