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a coworker has been turning a sub liter kawaski into a chopper, something he has done with a variety of bikes. But this one he couldn't get to start, after redoing the wiring. The problem was the the 5 volt line for the computer. the Kaw uses a 100 ohm resistor in the ignition switch to drop battery voltage to 5 volts for the computer-not shown on the wiring diagram; his was shorted. How does the Wee provide 5 VDC for the computer?

szalmander '06 Wee with Ricor shocks fore and aft, and eastern beaver upgrades for the lights and fuse box.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The Stroms also have a 100 Ohm resistor in the ignition switch. My understanding is it is an anti theft device. Hot wiring the bike would bypass the resistor and the bike can't be started.
 

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I know for sure that the Kawasaki Ninja 250 also uses a 100 ohm resistor in the ignition circuit as a simple anti theft device to make hot wiring the bike more difficult. Of course if you know it's there, you can work around it.

If you want 5v you just use a 5v regulator, not a resistor.

Bike alarms serve a different purpose.

Since 3-4 guys can lift most bikes into the back of a van, there's really no way to absolutely prevent a bike being stolen. All you can do is make it more difficult and inconvenient for the casual thief.
 

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Being trained in electronics, I can assure you this is not the +5 volt powersupply for the computer. It is simply what is known as a "pull up" resistor.

As others have said, this pull-up resistor is used to help the computer 'know' if the ignition-switch is being bypassed.

The computer has a +5 volt regulator within it to provide a stable voltage using the 12 volts as the 'master' supply. This provides the voltage-regulator with 7 volts of 'overhead'.
 

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Being trained in electronics, I can assure you this is not the +5 volt powersupply for the computer. It is simply what is known as a "pull up" resistor.

As others have said, this pull-up resistor is used to help the computer 'know' if the ignition-switch is being bypassed.

The computer has a +5 volt regulator within it to provide a stable voltage using the 12 volts as the 'master' supply. This provides the voltage-regulator with 7 volts of 'overhead'.
+1 on this post...
 

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Bruce:

I dunno..

Pull up resistors are seldom that low because they pull too much current when engaged. Greater than 10K is typical.

My guess is the 100 ohm R is used to provide a reading for an ADC. My guess (again this whole thing is a guess) is that if you used a 200 ohm R the bike wouldn't start because the ADC on the uC would see an out of spec value from the V drop. If the 100 ohm was a pull up, the bike would still start as the value of a pull up doesn't have to be that closely controller.


Being trained in electronics, I can assure you this is not the +5 volt powersupply for the computer. It is simply what is known as a "pull up" resistor.

As others have said, this pull-up resistor is used to help the computer 'know' if the ignition-switch is being bypassed.

The computer has a +5 volt regulator within it to provide a stable voltage using the 12 volts as the 'master' supply. This provides the voltage-regulator with 7 volts of 'overhead'.
 
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