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I've never had a seal problem on a bike with fork gaiters. Rancho RS1952 boots fit nicely. They do limit travel a little though. Cut off the bottoms if you have a fork brace and that can help the travel limitation.



Ha!!
Your worried about grit on the forks but not about a rock smashing your oil filter!!
 

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this past summer I had 1 fork seal weeping. I tried running a business card around in there and it worked. didn't even need a seal mate.
 

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I've never had a seal problem on a bike with fork gaiters. Rancho RS1952 boots fit nicely. They do limit travel a little though. Cut off the bottoms if you have a fork brace and that can help the travel limitation.
Ha!!
Your worried about grit on the forks but not about a rock smashing your oil filter!!
FYI, you are responding to a 7 year old post by a member who passed away in 2018.
 

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Thanks for reviving this old post. I agree with other posts, if you are riding in dirty places put on some type of fork protection like the rubber boots greywolf recommends or neoprene covers. I didn't last year and they started leaking.
I was able to fix the leak using a Seal Mate tool which can be purchased on Ebay for $8. I have used this tool and 35mm film for several years on dirt bikes with good success. In my case the leak was caused by sand or dirt trapped by the seal letting the fork oil seep past. I clean the seal area and dust cap with liberal application of WD40 and rags/Qtip before and after using the Seal Mate. This won't fix a blow or damaged seal.
 

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Old thread, but worth reviving!


Semi-related story:

I once assisted a gent who had a minor fork seal leak and heard that you could often clean fork seals with a homemade plastic tool.

However, he didn't quite grok the "THIN plastic" part, and cut his tool out of the very thick plastic found in a milk jug. Somehow he forced it in there anyway, and destroyed both seals.



Also, a few points worth mentioning:
- Across many brands and types of motorcycles, I've consistently found that OEM fork seals always last the longest. Well worth the small added expense. Just don't even bother with any aftermarket seals unless you can't get OEM for some reason.

- To save a little money, carefully inspect the dust seals; you usually don't need to replace these.

- Pop the dust seals up a little and look inside before ordering the fork seals. Order up new clips (and washers, if the bike uses them) if you see the slightest signs of rust. Rust flakes from the clips or washers are a common cause of leaks, and clips can of course also get weak and break if they're too corroded. Clips are cheap.
 

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I put a strip of green kitchen scourer between the dust seal and the oil seal.

It collects any crud stopping it getting to the oil seal.

On very muddy rides I will clean it or replace it otherwise I change it at each service.

It great at collecting dried bug guts that like to get past the dust seal.
 
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I just replaced the seals on one side. Used a Tusk seal kit with Bel Ray 10W oil. Not too hard of a job. A bit messy and the fork lower bolt goes in and out well with an impact.
 
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