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Discussion Starter #1
I finally got around to removing my forks and installing a set of
Sonic 1.1 springs. I had purchased two bottles of Honda SS-8 10wt oil which come in 473 ml bottles. After filling the fork with a whole bottle (473ml) my air space was right at 135mm and 139mm respectively.
Since the 1.1 Sonics are a heavier spring than stock and take up more volume inside the fork, should the oil height be more than 130-140mm?
 

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I finally got around to removing my forks and installing a set of
Sonic 1.1 springs. I had purchased two bottles of Honda SS-8 10wt oil which come in 473 ml bottles. After filling the fork with a whole bottle (473ml) my air space was right at 135mm and 139mm respectively.
Since the 1.1 Sonics are a heavier spring than stock and take up more volume inside the fork, should the oil height be more than 130-140mm?
Check the Sonic Springs instructions for the correct oil height. :)

Also make sure that you're measuring the oil height per the instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I purchased these from a member here who recently parted out his farkles. I did not get the instructions.:fineprint:
Maybe you can help?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Have you checked the spring rate calculator? SonicSprings.com

1.1kg/mm springs are only for very heavy riders.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Have you checked the spring rate calculator? SonicSprings.com

1.1kg/mm springs are only for very heavy riders.
I'm right at 245 with my riding gear and I carry a tank bag that is full along with a passenger 99% of the time. Bike is toating a load!
the calculator puts me solo at a 1.0 spring.
 

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I'm not heavy , I'm his brother. :biggrinjester: Rob , I'll look for the instructions , if (big if) I still have them , I'll fire you a copy with my Smartphone.
 

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I'm not heavy , I'm his brother. :biggrinjester: Rob , I'll look for the instructions , if (big if) I still have them , I'll fire you a copy with my Smartphone.
LOL! Thanks for the bail-out! I'll pm you my number. They must contain some top secret info!
 

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Sorry, didn't realize that you bought them second hand. I've pasted the instructions below.


Changing springs and oil, V-Strom forks

This guide is intended to be a supplement to the factory manual, not a replacement for it. The factory manual is needed for proper torque specs and for any bike-specific procedures. When in doubt please consult a qualified professional mechanic.

The first requirement is to have all the weight off the front wheel. If you have a centerstand put the bike on it and jack up under the engine, so that the front wheel is off the ground. If your bike doesn’t have a centerstand use a rear stand in conjunction with the type of front end stand that lifts from under the steering head.

1) Remove the calipers, front wheel, fender and anything else that’s attached to the forks.

2) Unbolt the handlebars from the top triple clamp and move them forward. No need to remove any of the grips, cables or wires.

From here do one side at a time, and the order of events is important.

3) Back the preload adjuster, if any, all the way out.
4) Loosen the top triple bolt.
5) Loosen the fork cap, but only a turn or 2.
6) Loosen the bottom triple clamp bolts and slide the fork leg out.
7) Remove the cap and take out the spacer, spring and any washers. For the DL1000 you’ll need to break loose the nut under the fork cap holding the cartridge rod and then spin the cap off the rod.
8) Dump the old oil, pumping the fork leg while it's inverted to make sure you've got all of it out. When you refill, make sure you pump the fork through its full stroke a few times to get all the air out of the bottom of the fork.
9) Spacers: If you have an early DL1000 without the preload caps, cut the spacers according to the directions in Note A. If you have a later one with the preload caps just use the stock spacer and washers.
For the 650, cut the spacers to 4 1/4". You'll need to put a washer on top of the spacer as well as one between the spring and spacer. In other words, the order when putting things back in the fork is oil, set the oil level, spring, washer, spacer, washer. Another option for the 650 is to just use the stock spacer plus the washers that are in the package. In that case put those washers in between the spring and stock spacer. For most people that will work just fine. If you’re using Race-Tech cartridge emulators shorten the given spacer lengths by the height of the emulator.

11) Set the fork oil level to 150mm. (Level is defined as the distance between the top of the fork tube and the top of the oil in the tube, and is set with the spring and spacer out, forks collapsed. Because of the way it’s measured a smaller number means more oil.) A handy item for this is a turkey baster. Measure the desired distance from the tip up and mark that spot with a sharpie or a piece of tape. Make sure that there’s a little more oil than needed in the tube, then align the mark with the top of the fork tube and suck any excess out. Put in the new spring, the washer that came with it, the spacer and the stock washer, if any. For fork oil weight see Note B.
12) Re-install, reverse order as disassembly. Just be careful when putting the fork cap back on, they're easy to cross-thread.
13) Double check all bolts, and make sure to pump up the front brake before riding.

NOTE A: Cutting spacers

The purpose of the spacers is to provide the proper amount of pre-load on the springs. In general street bikes need about ½” of pre-load, assuming that the spring rate is correct for the weight of the bike and rider. So the question is, how do we determine the right length for the spacer??
Take the fork cap, and if it has a pre-load adjustment set it in the middle. Now measure the depth of the cap from the bottom to the base of the portion that sits against the top of the fork tube. Include any stock washer that will sit on top of the spacer. Basically we’re measuring the length of the portion that fits inside the fork tube.
Say for example that this length is 2”. If we cut the spacer so that with the spring, washer and spacer installed it came up flush with the top of the fork tube, when we installed the fork cap the spring would be compressed 2”. Too much. So we need to cut the spacer shorter to get the proper pre-load. In this case 1 ½” shorter. Easiest way to measure this is to put the spring, washer and uncut spacer in the extended fork leg. Mark the spacer tube even with the top of the fork tube. Pull the spacer out and measure 1 ½” down from the mark. Mark and cut from that point. Now when you put the spring, washer and spacer in the top of the spacer should be 1 ½” below the top of the fork tube. When the fork cap is installed the 2” section inside the fork tube will compress the spring ½”. Voila, correct pre-load!! Just make sure you use the right numbers for you, not the ones in this example. Also, back the adjuster all the way back out before re-installing the fork cap, to make it easier to get the threads started. Re-set the adjuster to the middle position after everything is bolted back up.

NOTE B: Oil weight

DL1000: If you’re a fairly aggressive rider use 10w oil, if you're more of a normal touring/commuting rider then the 7.5w. Set the level to 150mm.

DL 650: Changing springs and oil, V-Strom forks

This guide is intended to be a supplement to the factory manual, not a replacement for it. The factory manual is needed for proper torque specs and for any bike-specific procedures. When in doubt please consult a qualified professional mechanic.

The first requirement is to have all the weight off the front wheel. If you have a centerstand put the bike on it and jack up under the engine, so that the front wheel is off the ground. If your bike doesn’t have a centerstand use a rear stand in conjunction with the type of front end stand that lifts from under the steering head.

1) Remove the calipers, front wheel, fender and anything else that’s attached to the forks.

2) Unbolt the handlebars from the top triple clamp and move them forward. No need to remove any of the grips, cables or wires.

From here do one side at a time, and the order of events is important.

3) Back the preload adjuster, if any, all the way out.
4) Loosen the top triple bolt.
5) Loosen the fork cap, but only a turn or 2.
6) Loosen the bottom triple clamp bolts and slide the fork leg out.
7) Remove the cap and take out the spacer, spring and any washers. For the DL1000 you’ll need to break loose the nut under the fork cap holding the cartridge rod and then spin the cap off the rod.
8) Dump the old oil, pumping the fork leg while it's inverted to make sure you've got all of it out. When you refill, make sure you pump the fork through its full stroke a few times to get all the air out of the bottom of the fork.
9) Spacers: If you have an early DL1000 without the preload caps, cut the spacers according to the directions in Note A. If you have a later one with the preload caps just use the stock spacer and washers.
For the 650, cut the spacers to 4 1/4". You'll need to put a washer on top of the spacer as well as one between the spring and spacer. In other words, the order when putting things back in the fork is oil, set the oil level, spring, washer, spacer, washer. Another option for the 650 is to just use the stock spacer plus the washers that are in the package. In that case put those washers in between the spring and stock spacer. For most people that will work just fine. If you’re using Race-Tech cartridge emulators shorten the given spacer lengths by the height of the emulator.

11) Set the fork oil level to 150mm. (Level is defined as the distance between the top of the fork tube and the top of the oil in the tube, and is set with the spring and spacer out, forks collapsed. Because of the way it’s measured a smaller number means more oil.) A handy item for this is a turkey baster. Measure the desired distance from the tip up and mark that spot with a sharpie or a piece of tape. Make sure that there’s a little more oil than needed in the tube, then align the mark with the top of the fork tube and suck any excess out. Put in the new spring, the washer that came with it, the spacer and the stock washer, if any. For fork oil weight see Note B.
12) Re-install, reverse order as disassembly. Just be careful when putting the fork cap back on, they're easy to cross-thread.
13) Double check all bolts, and make sure to pump up the front brake before riding.

NOTE A: Cutting spacers

The purpose of the spacers is to provide the proper amount of pre-load on the springs. In general street bikes need about ½” of pre-load, assuming that the spring rate is correct for the weight of the bike and rider. So the question is, how do we determine the right length for the spacer??
Take the fork cap, and if it has a pre-load adjustment set it in the middle. Now measure the depth of the cap from the bottom to the base of the portion that sits against the top of the fork tube. Include any stock washer that will sit on top of the spacer. Basically we’re measuring the length of the portion that fits inside the fork tube.
Say for example that this length is 2”. If we cut the spacer so that with the spring, washer and spacer installed it came up flush with the top of the fork tube, when we installed the fork cap the spring would be compressed 2”. Too much. So we need to cut the spacer shorter to get the proper pre-load. In this case 1 ½” shorter. Easiest way to measure this is to put the spring, washer and uncut spacer in the extended fork leg. Mark the spacer tube even with the top of the fork tube. Pull the spacer out and measure 1 ½” down from the mark. Mark and cut from that point. Now when you put the spring, washer and spacer in the top of the spacer should be 1 ½” below the top of the fork tube. When the fork cap is installed the 2” section inside the fork tube will compress the spring ½”. Voila, correct pre-load!! Just make sure you use the right numbers for you, not the ones in this example. Also, back the adjuster all the way back out before re-installing the fork cap, to make it easier to get the threads started. Re-set the adjuster to the middle position after everything is bolted back up.

NOTE B: Oil weight

DL1000: Generally 7.5w fork oil, if you're a very aggressive street rider then 10w. Set the level at 150mm.

DL 650: Generally 10w fork oil, if you're a very aggressive street rider then 15w. Set the level at 150mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Rich! I'll re-adjust my oil height to 150mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Your going to love em. I also popped an ELKA shock what a difference. Jim in Ojai :thumbup:

Just had to rub that in didn't ya! LOL! Thought Mama would get me one for my birthday but nooooo!
Seriously...I was eyeballing that 465 with RAP on the Adventuretech thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Any problem compressing the spring and threading the cap back on?
Not a problem. I used the stock spacer and it all went back together just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I put 800 fast NC mountain road miles on the new springs this weekend (two up) and cannot say enough good about the difference in handling. I went ahead and adjusted the oil height to 150mm. Pre-load was set all the way out on 5 and seemed good. Set the shock pre-load at max and turned in the dampning to about 3/8 out from full in. 7/8 is stock.
I'm right at 245 lbs with gear and ride 99% of time with pillion and bags full including tank bag. Forks felt firm on slow going pavement but felt perfect pushing it hard on the BRP and other twisties in the area. Much better handling and recommend to those who are considering a set of Sonic springs to do it!
 

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I put 800 fast NC mountain road miles on the new springs this weekend (two up) and cannot say enough good about the difference in handling. I went ahead and adjusted the oil height to 150mm. Pre-load was set all the way out on 5 and seemed good. Set the shock pre-load at max and turned in the dampning to about 3/8 out from full in. 7/8 is stock.
I'm right at 245 lbs with gear and ride 99% of time with pillion and bags full including tank bag. Forks felt firm on slow going pavement but felt perfect pushing it hard on the BRP and other twisties in the area. Much better handling and recommend to those who are considering a set of Sonic springs to do it!
:hurray: Amazing what a difference it makes , huh?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
:hurray: Amazing what a difference it makes , huh?
It should be one of your first farkles.
I was actually surprised how my shock held up against the new springs. It could definately use some help but not as bad as I thought.
 
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