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I've read through several strings about fork dive, and methods to remedy it with after-market springs and cartridge emulators. An acquaintance who put on stiffer Racetech springs and emulators highly recommends it. The local suzuki shop says they just put in progressive springs and heavier oil, but according to some threads DL 650 springs are all ready progressive as stock equipment. Some posters have said that they saw little improvement in fork dive with stiffer springs. Another thread questions the practical utility of the cartridge emulators and opines that most improvement is gotten from stiffer springs and heavier fork oil . . . Needles to say, I remain just as confused about everything except the fact that my 2006 Vstrom dives waaay too much when I have to brake suddenly. I use my bike 95% of the time as a freeway commuter, traveling 35 miles one-way on a pretty busy interstate. Has anyone out there replaced the fork springs with stiffer springs (Racetech recommends .9KG springs for my weight) and subsequently installed emulators, and have they been able to detect improvement from either or both? I am not going to do the installing myself, and the local suzuki dealers are lukewarm about changing out the springs, so I need some specific information to make a decision on what to do about the fork dive. Everything else about the bike is fine, but I really dislike the abrupt front-end plunge when I have to stop suddenly.
 

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Spring rate has the biggest effect on the amount of dive. Heavier oil, and to a lesser extent the emulators, control the rate of the dive.
Given the geometry of telescopic forks some dive unavoidable. What we want to prevent is so much dive that there's no travel left to deal with bumps, and to control the rate at which the bike pitches forward when you nail the brakes.

So the first thing to consider is springs and oil. Emulators help just a bit with dive, their primary benefit is to reduce high speed compression damping so that sharp bumps aren't transmitted as sharply to the rider.
 

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Rich, I see you had or have a 2007 dl 650. From your previous posts I assume you have tuned it up some. What did you do to your fork?
 

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Rich, I see you had or have a 2007 dl 650. From your previous posts I assume you have tuned it up some. What did you do to your fork?
Just some 0.90 springs and 15w fork oil. Most people will be happier with 10w fork oil though, my setup is biased for sport riding.
 

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I just swapped in 1.1 Sonic Springs (weight+riding style) in my 1000 3 weeks ago. I've done about 1,200 miles of Mountain twisties and my regular old commute (3-400 miles) since. Front end is Much better , for sporting around , and brake dive is much more acceptable. Excellent product Rich.:thumbup:
 

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Spring preload to lessen dive

I have a DL1000, but it's probably the same situation with a DL650. I got rid of about 65% of my front low-speed dive (as when braking) end dive by simply cranking the fork spring preload down a bit. A little bit made a huge difference.
 

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IMO the Ricor Intiminators do a Really good job controlling fork dive. The Cogent Dynamics DDC valves do well also, not quite as good as the Ricors though. If you are riding street only the Ricors should work for you as a "install and forget it" solution. Whatever you decide, your springs should be upgraded to suit your weight and that maybe a good place to start and see if you are happy with that.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Both the spring rate and the damping effect brake dive. A massively stiff spring would control it well. That same massively stiff spring will need a lot of rebound damping to control it. The stiff spring will change the resonant frequency of the suspension, drastically changing the ride quality for not only a stiffer ride but in a way that will transfer a lot of road iregularities to the rider. A gold wing uses a 0.85kg spring rate in the forks and not because Honda engineers are stupid. A ton of compression damping will also control the dive, that is what is happening in the intiminators. Lots of compression damping will also transfer bump energy into the rider. As suspension tuners, we want to match the spring rate and the damping profile to work together in an application and in a way that provides the correct amount of chassis rotation, bump control, rider feel and traction. Peoples preferences also vary and some folks fixate on one aspect. If a 170 lb rider puts 1.1 kg mm springs and 15 wt oil in their wee forks, the brake dive will be greatly reduced but the bikes going to ride like crap in many people's oppinion. At the end of the day, most of us will want a good degree of chassis rotation as a performance and handling benefit. Coming into corners on paved or gravel roads, I want the front to settle in a controlled manner while I am on the front brake, as I tip the bike into the corner, I am trading that fork compression from my braking load to the cornering forces. Doing that gives weight transfer and even potential advantages in chassis geometry for making the turn. Once the bike begins the turn, picking up on the throttle and the relaxing of the cornering force transfers the weight for my acceleration traction at the rear. Even the rear shock effects the "brake dive". Balance, control, traction and comfort; those are what we want to look for. I dislike anti dive suspension systems like the ols DKW I owned or the BMW link type forks that don't brake dive until I am in the corner and let off the brakes. I also personally don't like the inertia valve system for some of the same reason and others. Anyhow, I think if you have the opportunity to ride a properly setup strom, you will be impressed how smooth and controlled they can be.

All that said, if all your riding is on the freeway and brake dive is your big and perhaps only complaint, I agree with Todd, put in our competitors Intiminators with your stock springs. That inertia valve will really add a lot of control of the brake dive at the lowest cost.
 

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My "brake dive" issue feels like an hydraulic issue. There is an initial dive when first applying the front brake, then the springs hold the rest. It's how easy that first initial movement is that makes me think hydraulic. It has .90 springs, 35mm w/rider, & 10 wt @ 150mm, I am 180 w/o gear.
So before I try (again) to turn a pigs ear into a silk purse, is the general consensus that re-valving will help this?
Thanks guys. :thumbup:
 

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My K6 had professionally set up Racetech emulators and 0.9 springs, my L2 has Intiminators.

The Intiminators are vastly better if you ride hard - as in - the front end feel is like a high end sportsbike, near zero brake dive, and you can just chuck the bike into a lumpy corner, hit the brakes so hard the rear end lifts, and all that happens is that you slow down. The larger the bump, the better they work.

Downside, the Intiminators are harsher on smooth roads - less harsh than running K60 tires, but harsher than the Racetech emulators.


Pete
 

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I am picking up my 2011 next week, but when I had my '06 I know it needs a little help.... I'm planning on straight rate springs and will probably change the valving.... Intiminators sounds like what I might want for the type of riding I'll be doing...... trying to keep up with my sport touring pals..... thanks for the reviews.........
 

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