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Discussion Starter #1
The last few weeks in the good ol Pacific Northwest have been extremely foggy.

The weather is ok otherwise, but I can't see through this crap. My pinlock helmet is no match vs the soupy air.

I'm wondering if the brain-bucket + goggles solution that the Harley guys use works in fog. Or do the goggles just end up opaque with condensation as well?

ANyone with experience on this?
 

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Goggles will probably fog up in the same conditions, maybe even worse. Depends on the amount of airflow you can get through them. If you're riding behind a windshield chances are neither your helmet or the proposed goggle are getting much airflow. Sounds like it's time for an electrically heated face shield. They actually do make such things for snowmobiling. Or maybe one of those Foggy Respro type devices, to keep your breath out of your helmet - if you can stand wearing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the tips. That kind of equipment sounds a bit extreme. I guess foggy days are good ones to leave the bike in the garage and drive. I rode back from work at 11pm, and the only way I could see was by raising the visor, slouching down behind the windshield and peering over the top. Even then, visibility was only about 20 to 30 feet. Spooky.
 

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Be careful out there in the fog.

During one of my recent group rides we rode into heavy fog. I slowed the group down, but was surprised to cagers appearing out of nowhere with no lights on. Anyway, I was concentrating on watching for other cars when peripheral warning went off. I glanced up to see a red light. I'm thankful for the ABS on, not only, my bike but the 2012 VStrom 650 behind me. The guy on the cruiser next to me didn't fare so well. I heard the screeching tire and looked over to see him sliding. Then the weirdest thing happened. He bounced from one hip to the other, apparently when his leather chaps grabbed the asphalt, and was then thrown to his feet where he simply walked off the road. That's when I noticed something else very odd. His bike, I forget the make, did the same thing. I mean it hit one side on the crash bar then the other then balanced itself. The bike went about 1/8 of a mile where it came to rest, almost completely upright, on a guard rail.

Anyway, the light had just turned red and there was no traffic in the intersection. I managed to get stopped about 1 bike length past the white stop line. The other VStrom pilot and I were both wearing Sena's so he heard me announce 'RED LIGHT-PANIC STOP!!!'. Also, we were riding riding in a good staggered formation ( thank goodness ).

One more thing, keep in mind that green light travels further and is refracted less by water than red light.

You guys in the PNW have a lot more experience with this then we do down in the SE. But please be safe...
 

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It was a vstar 1100. Ya mr mcbride and i were lucky we had abs. The car behind me about caught me. Im just glad he had all his gear on, aside from the damn brain bucket...
 

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The only thing I have found to work in fog is riding with my shield up... not a good answer...
 

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Fog is about as dangerous as it gets. Maintain speed and hit something in front. Slow down and get rear-ended. No good answers, I think.
 

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Fog is about as dangerous as it gets. Maintain speed and hit something in front. Slow down and get rear-ended. No good answers, I think.
Exactly. I will ride in rain, but fog freaks me out....:yikes:
 

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Riding in fog is the only time I ever use the built in red blinky lights on the back of my Gmax gm68 helmet. Hopefully anyone coming up behind me will catch sight of those lights before I become a hood ornament.
 

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The only thing I have found to work in fog is riding with my shield up... not a good answer...
If you wear glasses too, you're really screwed. Even if the faceshield or goggles don't fog up, you can bet that your glasses will under them. I got contacts just for skiing and riding in those types of conditions.

I had a ProGrip anti-fog insert (similar to Fog City, or pinlock) in my Shoei helmet, and found it very resistant to fogging. In addition to providing a double-pane effect, it was also treated itself to be anti-fog. Of course, at that time I had to keep the shield partially open to keep my glasses from fogging up, which meant I got lots of air flow inside the shield, but also that eventually water would start dripping down the inside of the shield, which is also not very good for visibility.
 

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I have seen a few people riding with their 4 ways on in the fog. Not a bad idea. Can make some use out of it. I don't think I have ever used that feature. I wonder if the new 2014 V2 will have the 4 way flashers? Watch those mirrors.
 

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My son and I were on our way to the club rally on the Parkway and the visibility went down to about 40 ft. We slowed to about 10-15 mph with me in the rear using my emergency flashers. The visibility got so low it was disorienting maybe even a little veritigo.
 

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Pinlock

It is not possible for a properly installed and maintained Pinlock insert to fog in the PNW. I too have contacts for riding but sunglasses need Cat Crap or a similar fresh coating. If glasses are cleaned with soap and water, dried with lint free cloth, and a coating is properly applied, you ought never see white condensation on the lens but you may see enough water on the lens that there will be distortion. One could use the Cat Crap on the part of the inside of visor not covered by Pinlock. I have had those areas completed sealed with a thick, cream-like condensation with wet, sweaty face, dripping, but the Pinlock insert was perfectly clear. I don't ride in fog that restricts visibility but we do have a fog here where the first 10 feet or so off the pavement is liquid mist that you can see through and above that is a white layer you can't see thru. If you open the visor, the mist will coat the inside of a non Pinlock visor with white condensation if the temp is 40 or below and after a while you just have to ride with the visor up, more and more up. Western Wash. is the foggiest part of the country according to the NWS.
 

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No problems with my Pinlock visor in the PNW this past week. It works just fine. And it has been foggy foggy out, so much so that many flights out of Vancouver to regional airports have been canceled.

Perhaps your Pinlock needs cleaning? Soap and water, nothing else.
 

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I leave the visor open, one notch from closed. It gives good airflow for riding around town. On the interstate I close it and if that one notch isn't good enough at a stop, I'll open it all the way, then back to the last notch when I get moving again.
 

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I leave the visor open, one notch from closed. It gives good airflow for riding around town. On the interstate I close it and if that one notch isn't good enough at a stop, I'll open it all the way, then back to the last notch when I get moving again.
That how I work it too. Works fine with my Scorpion, but my HJC not so well.
 

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We were driving last night and saw a rider poorly outlined in the fog. His tail light bulb was burned out! If he'd been wearing a coat or vest with good reflective stripes he'd have been more visible to drivers.

4-way flashers are a great idea in very dense fog, and maybe even ride at very slow speed on the shoulder. I know the vertigo, and it is terrible--sometimes you have to stop at the first safe place.

Any headlights with poor light distribution will make it like riding into a white wall. I'm leery of HID lights in light assemblies designed for halogen bulbs for this reason.

There are coatings for the windscreen and the outside of the face shield that help the moisture bead up and blow away. Rain-X is the best known but will damage some types of plastic. MotoSolutions Raincoat® works very well. Pledge furniture polish works well for a day or two.

Moisture clouding the inside is always a concern. Breath deflectors from the helmet maker can help. More ventilation across the face shield helps--check that the vent ports in the foam liner as as big as the helmet designer intended and not clogged with glue, excess foam, etc. Dual pane snowmobile shields are available from some helmet makers. MotoSolutions Fogtech® works somewhat better than Cat Crap® or the other anti-fog products including just rubbing dry bar soap on the surface and buffing off. Nothing I've found works completely. Cracking my shield open works well on my Arai. On my Scorpion, cranking it open let rain drops blow up and cover my glasses.
 
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