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Discussion Starter #1
So now I'm putting together a good tubeless tire plug repair kit. How many of the CO2 cylinders will it take to fill fix and refill a rear tire? I know there are a lot variables doing this but someone here has done this and could give me an idea of how many.
 

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bad idea

So now I'm putting together a good tubeless tire plug repair kit. How many of the CO2 cylinders will it take to fill fix and refill a rear tire? I know there are a lot variables doing this but someone here has done this and could give me an idea of how many.
buy a 12V compressor, remove the case, tuck the compressor under your seat. Adjust electric connections to suit your bike (ciggy lighter, alligator clips, SAE fitting, Powerlet etc etc). If you plug repair method needs a blade - make sure you have a blade.
 
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CO2

Well, I have done it and it doesn't always work the first time so I'd have a couple, but actually I'd probably take 4, after all they are small. Getting to bead up was the problem.
Now I use a 12v pump, or at least take it with, never have had to use it.
Actually I was thinking about throwing the CO2 thing in the bag also.
 

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Putting a ratchet strap around the tyre circumference and winding it tight will help with setting the bead and the straps make great tow ropes should a tow be required.
 

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Well, I have done it and it doesn't always work the first time so I'd have a couple, but actually I'd probably take 4, after all they are small. Getting to bead up was the problem.
Now I use a 12v pump, or at least take it with, never have had to use it.
Actually I was thinking about throwing the CO2 thing in the bag also.
My $10 air compressor fits under the seat along with the repair plugs and tools. If I use this compressor just once I will replace it with a new one.

Personally, I suggest the best place for the CO2 cylinders is in the rubbish bin :serious:
 

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I use the worm-type of plug with the insertion tool, rasp, "worms", air compressor and alligator clip cigarette lighter adapter sitting under my seat along with my switched fuse box, autocom AVI-Pro, manual, multi tool, manual and some other odds and ends. I've fixed 6 or 7 flats on the road. All but one on my bikes, the other on a fellow rider's.

..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I guess this is just one of those things I'd be better off finding out myself. thanks all.
 

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I have enough experience with CO2 on mountain bikes to feel comfortable saying it is quite a few. Especially if you mean the standard little cartridges. If you are going to give it a go, look for the much bigger type CO2s that I think bike shops sell as"Big Air". I have wondered what might be bought at a place like AirGas in the way of a small aluminum tank of air or CO2. Hospitals have all sorts of small tanks of pressurized gases with regulators. Been meaning to look into that for a while for my on/off road adventures where I'd like to air down. Much faster than a compressor, and it has that sudden present that is sometimes necessary to pop a bead on. Limited number of uses though.
 

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I guess this is just one of those things I'd be better off finding out myself. thanks all.
Sure thing, not like any of us experienced riders know what we are talking about anyways. :wink2: So call me confused, but you appear to own many bikes currently, have you never had a flat nor ever had a tire repair kit before? CO2 is for bicycles, get a slime pump and any ole worm type plug kit.......you will thank us if and when you ever need it.:fineprint:
 

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If normal tubeless then a small compressor, pliers and a selection of different type plugs is enough. If you need anything more then a good phone.:smile2:
Tube tyres are a different ball game, have no experience there.
And that's the sum total of my knowledge.
 

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For anybody who hasn't had the "pleasure" of doing a roadside puncture repair, I suggest when you are due for a tyre change take the opportunity to do a repair at home.
Put your bike on the centre stand/paddock stand and drill a 4mm or 5mm hole in your tyre and repair it with your kit.
It is a great learning experience and relatively simple in this controlled environment.
If you have any difficulty with this, consider how much harder it would be on the side of the road in the rain of a night time.
 

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When I was on a ride a couple of weeks ago, a fellow rider got a puncture from a piece of wood on the road. We plugged it and pumped it back up with my compressor. The repair held for about an hour, then started to leak. We had to stop and repair again, and again use the compressor. This held for about an hour and a half, and then started to leak again.... We eventuall got him home ok.
If you're repair is perfect and isn't going to leak, then sure, use CO2. I would say you would need at least 4 cylinders to get it to about 34psi (different tyres will vary, and it will depend on getting a good connection so that you don't lose any gas).
If, however, things don't go to plan, then a compressor will take up about the same space as cylinders for a single repair, but will get you home again and not leave you stuck by the roadside.

Ultimately it's your call what you decide to go with, just wanted to share my experience.

Cheers,
Witherz
 

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I like BandiDaves thought: In fact I'm thinking about doing just (about) that. NO, I'm not drilling a hole in my tire.:wink2:
But I'd like to see if I could change out a tire in my driveway. I see guys carrying spare tires on a trip, and before I would do that, I'd need to know that I could actually change one out.
Now, putting air in the tire is one thing and fixing the flat is another. If you happen to run over a ROUND nail, for example, a plug will work great and you can fill it back up with a pump or a CO2 cartridge. But if you get a flat because of a sharp rock (or something like it) and it puts a GASH type hole in your tire, your screwed unless you have a spare with you. (or maybe your are thinking and carry a tube with you) I do carry AAA card and they will come and rescue me if I need them to.
Just some food for thought.
 

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But if you get a flat because of a sharp rock (or something like it) and it puts a GASH type hole in your tire, your screwed unless you have a spare with you
not true, it may take more than one plug, you can successfully plug a gash (even in the sidewall) well enuf to get to civilization

been there done that more than once, I've had as many as 4 plugs sticking out the sidewall of a tire



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I like BandiDaves thought: In fact I'm thinking about doing just (about) that. NO, I'm not drilling a hole in my tire.:wink2:
But I'd like to see if I could change out a tire in my driveway. I see guys carrying spare tires on a trip, and before I would do that, I'd need to know that I could actually change one out.
Now, putting air in the tire is one thing and fixing the flat is another. If you happen to run over a ROUND nail, for example, a plug will work great and you can fill it back up with a pump or a CO2 cartridge. But if you get a flat because of a sharp rock (or something like it) and it puts a GASH type hole in your tire, your screwed unless you have a spare with you. (or maybe your are thinking and carry a tube with you) I do carry AAA card and they will come and rescue me if I need them to.
Just some food for thought.
Repairing a puncture with multiple plugs is definitely worth a try.
I had a puncture some years ago caused by 3 nails attached together presumably from a nail gun.
After I used up 5 CO2 cartridges and still had a flat tyre a fellow traveller produced a compressor from his bike.
We connected the compressor to the tyre and ran it while inserting 3 plugs.
I rode a further 8000Kms on that tyre.

As for changing a tyre, I consider it quite a challenge on the side of the road and not one I would like to do.
If you seriously wanted to do so, check out a number of YouTube videos on tyre changing using cable ties.
Once again, I would want to try it at home just to have the experience should I need to in the future.

Did I mention I think CO2 cartridges are next to useless but might keep you "entertained" while waiting for roadside assistance.
 

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I like BandiDaves thought: In fact I'm thinking about doing just (about) that. NO, I'm not drilling a hole in my tire.:wink2:
But I'd like to see if I could change out a tire in my driveway. I see guys carrying spare tires on a trip, and before I would do that, I'd need to know that I could actually change one out.
Now, putting air in the tire is one thing and fixing the flat is another. If you happen to run over a ROUND nail, for example, a plug will work great and you can fill it back up with a pump or a CO2 cartridge. But if you get a flat because of a sharp rock (or something like it) and it puts a GASH type hole in your tire, your screwed unless you have a spare with you. (or maybe your are thinking and carry a tube with you) I do carry AAA card and they will come and rescue me if I need them to.
Just some food for thought.
I'm pretty sure that the folks who carry spare tires on trips do that so they know they'll have the right size/brand/tread tire to change out when they're ready, and not be at the mercy of what some dealer/parts place has in stock. They're not doing roadside tire swaps; they probably know (or at least have planned) exactly when and where they're going to have their tires swapped out (by a shop, or in somebody's garage) during their trip.

Just sayin'. :smile2:
 

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Good to know

Repairing a puncture with multiple plugs is definitely worth a try.
I had a puncture some years ago caused by 3 nails attached together presumably from a nail gun.
After I used up 5 CO2 cartridges and still had a flat tyre a fellow traveller produced a compressor from his bike.
We connected the compressor to the tyre and ran it while inserting 3 plugs.
I rode a further 8000Kms on that tyre.


I'm hoping I don't run into that senerio, :surprise: but if I do, I'll be keeping this in mind.
 
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