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I have 8700 miles on the factory Bridgestone Trailwings and will be replacing them with Mitas E07's this weekend, so I thought I would give my cheapo flat repair kit a test run.

Kit and #8 wood screw.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Plug Inserted

Elapsed time ~10 minutes.

With the bike on the center stand engine off, I drove the screw into my worn but serviceable tire using a screw gun.

I laid out the tools and read the destructions. :surprise:

1) remove screw.

2) immediately insert ream - forcefully.

3) because the wheel wanted to turn, I put the bike in 1st gear.

4) forcefully dragged the ream back and forth several times to evenly scuff the edges of the hole. Left ream in to minimize air loss.

5) took "needle" and coated it with rubber cement per instructions.

6) removed ream and quickly inserted needle with cement. Sliding it in and out a few times and reinserted ream to minimize leaking.

7) threaded plug half way through needle.

8) removed ream and finagled needle with plug into tire (forcefully)

9) removed needle
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Refill tire with CO2

Even though I tried to keep some air in the tire it was completely flat by the time I finished.

Using a Genuine Innovations bicycle tire inflator ($15) and 8 Crosman CO2 cartridges (~55 cents each when you buy a box of 40 from Walmart), I refilled the tire.

Each cartridge increased the pressure of the tire by exactly 5psi. (Didn't make sense to me.)

It was about 80 degrees when I filled the tire. I don't know how much difference freezing temperatures would have had on the volume of CO2 gas.

Eight cartridges later 40 psi.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Trim plug

Trimmed the plug approximately flush ...

Total time ~30 minutes from driving the screw to trimming the plug.
 

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Cool test. Let us know how long it holds air! It would be a good test for you to ride it and at least verify if it held for up to 2 hours or 100 miles. This would lend some confidence that this repair would at least last until the next town or maybe a bike shop.


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Discussion Starter #6
8 mile ride

So after posting the photos and description of the process, I went back out, checked the pressure (40 minutes later), and went for a ride.

The pressure was 37 psi, so I took an 8 mile ride mostly from 30 to 45 mph. Top speed of 50. Included a mountain bike trail with numerous roots, and a very bumpy gravel road with numerous roots.

When I got home, the tire pressure was 40 psi again.

Tomorrow is supposed to storm, so I'll check the tire pressure tomorrow AM and PM, the top the tire up and commute on Friday.

Picture of plug after 8 mile ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cool test. Let us know how long it holds air! It would be a good test for you to ride it and at least verify if it held for up to 2 hours or 100 miles. This would lend some confidence that this repair would at least last until the next town or maybe a bike shop.


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Good idea. I'll probably ride ~50 miles on Friday. 30 minutes. Spend the day at work and 30 minutes back. Maybe throw in a few gravel roads or a mountain bike trail.
 

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I rode probably 10-15 miles on a flattening tire to a spot I knew was level for parking. Better than stopping anywhere along Hwy2 going to Wrightwood.
A rock from the chipseal had done in my tired tire. The ream and worms did a decent job and the air pump worked well enough. I made it to Wrightwood and a gas station ans pumped up the tire properly and rode home.
I was amazed that the tire didn't try to leave the rim but I slowed down a lot. Bike never felt squirrely just odd.

It's good to know the equipment you carry will accomplish the task at hand and get you rolling agin.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I rode probably 10-15 miles on a flattening tire to a spot I knew was level for parking. Better than stopping anywhere along Hwy2 going to Wrightwood.
A rock from the chipseal had done in my tired tire. The ream and worms did a decent job and the air pump worked well enough. I made it to Wrightwood and a gas station ans pumped up the tire properly and rode home.
I was amazed that the tire didn't try to leave the rim but I slowed down a lot. Bike never felt squirrely just odd.

It's good to know the equipment you carry will accomplish the task at hand and get you rolling agin.
Thanks. How long did you ride before replacing the tire?

I've never read how well a plug works or lasts in a bike, and I had never plugged a bike tire either, so I wanted to learn in the comfort of a warm, dry, well lit garage. I saw the kit in a tourist trap when I was on a trip last year and bought it until I could find a better one. The bike pump is what I carry on my bicycle for flat repair, so I thought I would try it too.

I know this isn't rocket science, but thought I would share. Maybe someone has suggestions for a better way, or a bad story that I could learn from.
 

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I have had very good success/luck with these types of tire repair over the years. Not above plugging a nearly new tire and running it till it is gone. I have removed the tires and put a patch on the inside on a couple occasions after plugging it to get by for a while, but have not done that lately. I can handle the flaming about running plugged tires on a bike, so have at it! :kiss:

Reeming the hole is very important. I have the CO2 canisters as well as the pump with me. The CO2 is quite convenient, but it takes several if tire is very low.

One problem I have run into is the rubber cement you are supposed to use on regular tire plugs like you see in the posts above. About any you buy at Auto stores or Walmarts are this type. The rubber cement is makes all the difference in sealing and even makes it easier to insert. That is fine if your cement tube is fresh and never opened, but after a couple years in a hot pannier or very shortly after opening the cement dries up. :crying2:

I have been using another type for a while. These look something like the standard type, but are made of different stuff and do NOT require or even recommend the rubber cement! I have seen these inside a tire after removing it and they do seem to be a permanent repair compared to the other type. I have them in two of our cars that don't have spare tires, and in the road kits I have with the bikes. Link: Nealy tire repair
 

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I've seen reports of better luck with the sticky worms than the rubber cemented ones and the sticky worms age better.
 

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I replaced my repaired tire immediately after getting home. It was thin in the middle and I was trying to use up the sides on a windy road. That ploy just didn'td wiork so well with road repair going on.
Those worm kits are cheap and as Shelby saiys, they get cooked in the top box or beat to death flopping around with other stuff in a top box or under the seat.
Easier to gift yourself at Wally Mart occasionally.

Cars that don't have spares.....I got a real tire and rim for our Camry after the wife hit a rock amd bent the rim and cut the tire.
Those rolling donut replacements don't evoke me any confidence
 

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Cars that don't have spares.....I got a real tire and rim for our Camry after the wife hit a rock amd bent the rim and cut the tire.
Those rolling donut replacements don't evoke me any confidence
When I say "don't have a spare", I mean literally they don't have a spare! As in NO donut or any other version. My Ford C-max and the wifes Jaguar F-type come with a compressor and a plug kit only. I have a set of the Nealy plugs in both cars.
 

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Thanks. How long did you ride before replacing the tire?

I've never read how well a plug works or lasts in a bike, and I had never plugged a bike tire either, so I wanted to learn in the comfort of a warm, dry, well lit garage. I saw the kit in a tourist trap when I was on a trip last year and bought it until I could find a better one. The bike pump is what I carry on my bicycle for flat repair, so I thought I would try it too.

I know this isn't rocket science, but thought I would share. Maybe someone has suggestions for a better way, or a bad story that I could learn from.

I've used the worms on nearly new tires and put thousands of miles on them without problems. Typically if they are holding air for a couple of days they are good for the duration in my experience.

My advice is invest in an 12v air pump. The smallest Slime pump works well and fits under the seat.

Another thing, consider the glue tube a single use item. Once it's opened it will be dried out by the next time you need to use it! Get and keep a spare tube of un-opened glue in your kit.
 

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I have done a bunch of flat repairs (I think 6 on my bike and on another riders bike) using the sticky worms (no glue required) and the little air compressor I have under my seat. In at least a couple of cases the tires were almost new and the plug lasted the normal life of the tire.

I had the same kind of repair on my old Porsche Boxster on an a almost new rear tire (two weeks old.) One of my techs did it at work (his suggestion) and the tire went through it's normal life cycle with the plug in; well over 40,000 km/25,000 miles.

..Tom
 

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I have been using another type for a while. These look something like the standard type, but are made of different stuff and do NOT require or even recommend the rubber cement! I have seen these inside a tire after removing it and they do seem to be a permanent repair compared to the other type. I have them in two of our cars that don't have spare tires, and in the road kits I have with the bikes. Link: Nealy tire repair
Second that 100%. I had the good fortune to test the Nealy strings. Last year 3 times in one day on the same tire. It's a long story but I am convinced no other strings would have performed as well and allowed my to limp to a shop to get the tire replaced! If you have a big hole you can push in 2 strings and they will seal the hole.
I bought 2 more sets after that experience and send one to my son for his bike.
And get a compressor. Make sure the battery Tender Pigtail has a 15A fuse in it. That's the simplest way to connect the compressor, but it needs more than the typical 5A fuse that's in the pigtail ... how do I know?
 

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I prefer a compressor instead of the CO2 canisters. CO2 pressure fluctuates significantly with changes in temperature. I too have had better results using plugs without glue.


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Elapsed time ~10 minutes.

With the bike on the center stand engine off, I drove the screw into my worn but serviceable tire using a screw gun.

I laid out the tools and read the destructions. :surprise:

1) remove screw.

2) immediately insert ream - forcefully.

3) because the wheel wanted to turn, I put the bike in 1st gear.

4) forcefully dragged the ream back and forth several times to evenly scuff the edges of the hole. Left ream in to minimize air loss.

5) took "needle" and coated it with rubber cement per instructions.

6) removed ream and quickly inserted needle with cement. Sliding it in and out a few times and reinserted ream to minimize leaking. Why put ream back in? The glue is now scraped off the sides of the hole.

7) threaded plug half way through needle. Put some glue on it...

8) removed ream and finagled needle with plug into tire (forcefully).....see 6 comment

9) removed needle
I sort of modified the technique some, you are free to disagree.

I would just ream the hole. Use plug tool to put glue in the hole. Then put plug on tool, glue on plug, plug in hole and remove tool. Let plug glue vulcanize for 15 minutes or so, unless a jealous husband is chasing you, you do not want to have a plug shoot back out....and they have come right out on me once. The tire will be flat by then anyway and you should have a pump, not CO2 if you are serious about riding. I carry a cheap 12V pump and a lightweight mountain bike pump as a backup on long trips. The pumps are small anyway and it may take several plugs or you may get two flats on a ride. Re-inflate after the 15 minute break.

I also plug tires and run them till worn out, but have had about half develop a slow leak with miles. I always spit test my plugs at night on a long trip and check pressure in the morning. I have never had one blow the plug out but they will loose 3-5 psi a day sometimes. I have reduced my plug failure rate by clipping the plugs off about 1/8 inches long with a knife or other suitable gadget. I think the flexing of the loose end of the plug, till it wore off, may have buggered some of my efforts or it could be mental masturbation...but it seemed to help.
 

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I have 8700 miles on the factory Bridgestone Trailwings and will be replacing them with Mitas E07's this weekend, so I thought I would give my cheapo flat repair kit a test run.

Kit and #8 wood screw.
This is something I would do. You have put your theories to the test. Hope you didn't tell the wife you drilled a hole in a good tire. >:)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I've seen reports of better luck with the sticky worms than the rubber cemented ones and the sticky worms age better.


These were gooey stranded orange worms. The cement was as thin as water and smelled like lacquer thinner.


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