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Bought last May and it now is just shy of 16K.
Found some out and some close, so glad I did it now.
Front EX .010 &.008 in.
Front IN .005 &.004
Rear IN .003 & .004
Rear EX .007 & .009
All now in mid to upper end. The front was easy to access, but the rear was tight and difficult. The valve cover has barely enough room to remove it(The brake unit in front of the battery has steel lines over it) and the timing marks are somewhat hidden(I used a mirror and flashlight). Other than not having to deal with cam chains I think the 650 is easier.
Thought this might be helpful to those thinking of putting it off. "Probably" would have gone longer without harm, but why wait. Now I feel comfortable to go 30K before another check.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sweet now come do mine please.
At least the 14-16 doesn't have the brake unit in the way.
I did it for 30-40 Troopers before I moved from the Seattle area.
 

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Bought last May and it now is just shy of 16K. Found some out and some close, so glad I did it now.

Front EX .010 &.008 in.
Front IN .005 &.004
Rear IN .003 & .004
Rear EX .007 & .009

...
What is the allowed range, exhausts and intakes, for that (1000) bike?

Thanks.

:smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What is the allowed range, exhausts and intakes, for that (1000) bike?

Thanks.

:smile2:
Same as the 650, .004-.008 for the intakes and .008-.012 for exhausts
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's good you posted the results...kinda throws out that whole "never check-em and their fine" theory some tend to go by here.
That was part of my reasoning. Having adjusted 30-40 Stroms over the years, I know the odds.
 

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I have a feeling there are lots of Stroms (and probably other bikes) out there with tighter-than-spec valves.

When I asked, here, in a different thread, exactly how to determine, by sense of touch ("feel"), which feeler gage blade was the correct one, I was surprised by the relative silence. I finally resorted to YouTube, mostly (got a comment or two here, and I appreciate those), and "learned" that the correct "feel" is like that of pulling a sheet of paper from between two glossy magazines - or from pulling a piece of common tape from a piece of flat glass. That's a very minor amount of applied force.

If people simply keep pushing ever-thicker feeler gage blades into the gap, until they can't force in a wider one, then I think that might be wrong. I saw YouTube videos of valve springs being easily compressed by a person's fingers (with apparently little pressure being applied). So - this is what makes me suspect there are a lot of too-tight valves out there. Heck, I'd taken my Wee to a dealer, for the valve safety recall, and they told me, when I asked about the valves "they're OK". When I checked them myself 10K miles later, applying the "feel" requirement stated above, they clearly were not "OK".

But, until the gaps go to zero (or beyond), I'm not sure that really hurts anything. I guess that's how some people can report 60, 70, 80+K miles, with no valve checks/adjusts, with good-running bikes. The gaps on my '12 Wee had to be getting pretty small (well out of tolerance), yet the bike started and ran fine.

The intakes seem to move very little, and they (should) begin with at least a 0.004-inch factory gap.

The exhausts move much faster, in my very limited experience, but they (should) begin with at least a 0.008-inch factory gap.

Maybe I'm wrong, but we (or at least I) checked the clearances on my Wee with the cam lobes "up" - away from the bucket. So what I presume is the "circular" part of the cam (the non-lobed portion) is down - toward the top of the bucket. It seems to me that as long at there IS a measurable gap, in that condition, then no damage is being done. It's only when there's enough wear in the valve seat to permit the valve to "rise" to the point where there's no gap, and where even the "circular" part of the cam is always pressing against the bucket, no matter what position the cam's in, that damage begins to be done.

Am I thinking about this correctly? I'd really like to be corrected if I'm thinking about this wrong.

By the way, I'm just rambling. Not saying what's right or wrong. I don't wrench for a living, so please do what you think is right.

:smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I believe the flaw in your theory is this. The check is done with a cold engine so as it heats up the gap tightens. The smallest gap spec still allows some at running temp. Lets assume a valve setting is below minimum. How much below min. can you go before there is no gap at highway speeds. Can't say for sure, but when that happens the damage begins.
This is the reason I've always preached to get the first CK done. The initial break-in is where the most wear occurs.
Your correct on the feel of the gauge. As GW used to say, it go or no go and needn't be forced.
 

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It's good you posted the results...kinda throws out that whole "never check-em and their fine" theory some tend to go by here.
Here is my take. And to be clear, I stretch this chore out as long as possible.

In the example from the OP, 8 valves, 2 were out of spec by .001. Some were at minimums. Would this bike have been damaged by doing no adjustment, extremely doubtful. Would I have adjusted them, yes because I had 2 out. If I had none out, but several minimums, I would have left them alone.

When I was working on performance engines, we would purposefully set valves at minimums to get the extra amount of free valve lift out of a given cam.

I have done my Strom as well as many other bikes. On my Strom I had some minimums I left alone at the first check, none out. The clearances opened enough to be above minimums by the next check and I quit checking that bike. The bike is over 100,000 miles now and running fine.

Several things are happening on a new engine. Valve seats recede and head bolts relax...clearance reduces. Later you get some cam lobe and bucket surface wear and clearance increases.

Do I check valves at the first recommended interval....usually. Do I do it at the second recommended interval....depends on what I found at check 1.

There is more than 1 theory. There are many bikes screwed up when checking valves. I have yet to come across a bike lately that burned a valve seat from tight valves. You are more likely to have a cam lobe wear down and increase clearance (you will hear) than to burn a valve.

And lastly, I typically find more valves that are too tight not from checking but when a customer/friend brings a bike to me that is hard to start when hot and pops on decel (which cannot be tuned out with fueling).

Just like changing oil to soon, checking valves more than needed will do no harm (assuming the mechanic does no harm). I am just as much a slacker with oil changes too, but I use the best oil and check it with my fingers occasionally.
 

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I believe the flaw in your theory is this. The check is done with a cold engine so as it heats up the gap tightens. The smallest gap spec still allows some at running temp...
You very well might be correct, but it seems to me that, as the engine warms to operating temperature, and the whole engine expands with temperature, that the length of the head would grow too, and take with it the cams embedded in it - thereby creating more gap between the cam and the bucket, which might be (equally?) offset by the growth in length of the valve (and shim, and bucket) - and we're back to more-or-less the same gap we had when cold.

I won't pretend to really know what I'm talking about here. I know essentially nothing about design of combustion engines.

Thanks for the comment, though, and I'd love to hear others.

:smile2:
 

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Another point from a different post.

The exhaust clearances are larger, but the range is the same as intakes. This is not done because the exhaust valves change quicker than intakes. Clearances are set this way because exhaust valves run hotter and the exhaust valve stem gets longer from thermal length change, than the intake valve stem does. Metal expands and contracts (the stem lengthens) due to the heat it experiences.
 

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From post 11. You are right and wrong.

Aluminum expands much less than steel when subjected to the same heat. The aluminum stuff grows but the steel parts grow more.

WRONG - CORRECTED DOWN THE PAGE
 

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From post 11. You are right and wrong.

Aluminum expands much less than steel when subjected to the same heat. The aluminum stuff grows but the steel parts grow more.
Interesting. Never had the reason to know this. Must be the reason to freeze a steel sleeve cyl. to remove it as the reverse must be true with cold.
 

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ST, yeah I put it off too and didn't get to mine until almost 22K.....nothing was out, but several at the max. I have read some saying never check 'em and I disagree with that as the first check is the most important. For me I will check mine again around 50K and then I most likely won't do it again. After seeing my buddy's DL 50-70% out of the Exhaust range(@ 75-ishK) it was an eye opener for sure. I'd bet money that bike never had a valve check done in it's life and that was a bad call on the previous owners.
 

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Interesting. Never had the reason to know this. Must be the reason to freeze a steel sleeve cyl. to remove it as the reverse must be true with cold.
I had this backwards, it's been awhile since school. I thought about this and went back and checked my books. The coefficient of thermal expansion for steel is about 0.000006 in/in F and aluminum 0.000013 in/in F.

So steel expands less than aluminum for the same heat change. But it gets more complicated, because it is based on volume and/or length also.

If the steel is 2 x as thick (or long) as the aluminum. Then

steel................ 2 inch x 0.000006 in/in x 1 degree F change = 0.000012 in and
aluminum........... 1 inch x 0.000013 in/in x 1 degree F change = 0.000013 in

I have never sleeved a cylinder (always sent them off). But, I have frozen bearings to install them.
 

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I had this backwards, it's been awhile since school. I thought about this and went back and checked my books. The coefficient of thermal expansion for steel is about 0.000006 in/in F and aluminum 0.000013 in/in F...

...But, I have frozen bearings to install them.
Yeah, I thought aluminum moved more, with heat, than steel.

And I too have been involved with freezing steel bearings prior to installing them in aluminum items.
 

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Gentlemen, there are other aspects to valve clearance:
The face of the exhaust valve is the hottest part of the engine in operation. The only time the valve gets cooled is through heat transfer from the valve face to the valve seat in the cylinder head. The greater the clearance, the longer the valve face is in contact with the seat. A tight exhaust valve may not have enough "seat time" to shed its heat to the point of valve face grooving, erosion, cracking, or burning. Not to mention damage to the seat itself. Also, a tight valve opens earlier and closes later,inversely a loose valve opens later and closes earlier in the combustion cycles, thus affecting valve timing. Which affects power.It's not just clearance, it's a matter of efficiency.
Yes, the valve stems grow in length, which is why most engine specify a clearance check when cold.
A tight exhaust valve running abnormally hot is being pulled up by the valve spring, and the valve head can "tulip" slightly in shape--which raises the stem, which subtracts from the clearance, which makes the situation even worse.
Ive seen instances of the head snapping off the stem with resultant piston and cylinder head combustion chamber damage. It ain't pretty.
And Ive seen valve jobs poorly done where the valve face was machined too far, leaving the valve face margin to the point where the valve would burn-not enough surface area left for heat transfer. And Ive seen both valve faces and seats machined to where the valve stem sat too high in the head, the assembled height of the valve and spring made it so that there was insufficient spring strength. Normal carbon build-uo on the valve face then couldnt be cut and cleaned off, leaving poor valve sealing and excessive clearance. If you remove material from the valve face and/or seat you have to remove some material from the valve stem end to compensate, and you may have to shim the valve spring to get the correct assembled spring height. And if too much is removed from the valve stem, you run the risk of the valve spring retainer and keepers being pushed off the stem grooves that hold them in place- with resulting mechanical death and destruction, just like a valve head snapping off.. The typical technician phrase "Yeah, it dropped a valve" is where this comes into play.
Not that any of this is going to happen to your engines...BUT IT CAN. Some people get lucky, some, not so much.
Many find all kinds of reasons for not doing maintenance. Out of a thousand that didnt have a problem, yours could easily be the one that did.
 

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I was anticipating your thoughts on this.

MAZ4ME, I agree with some, but not all of your reply. You are relating experience from many different engine types and from cars also. I would say if this is the topic, than many cars never see a valve check in their lifetime. Further, I know of engine types, Toyota specifically (what I work on most), where the manufacturers had material issues (soft seats) with their cylinder heads or weak valve stems, that precipitated the valve train issues.

You make a good point about the valve clearance effecting the dwell time when the valve is in contact with the valve seat. But IMHO, it is only part of the story. The cam lobe, when the valve starts opening and the clearance goes away, is only a portion of the base circle of the cam. The valve is shedding heat the entire time it is running on the base circle. The clearance does effect valve timing, but so can a worn cam chain, and both only effect the timing in a small way.

To think I am relying on "luck" is an over simplification. What I am relying on is experience and calculated risk. The strom is not known for soft valve seats, nor with having issues with burnt valves. These bikes see lots of miles and many see zero maintenace. The Tenere is known for good valve trains too. My 2013 was in spec at 26,000 miles (the Yamaha first check) and several of my friend's Teneres were also. I am skipping the first check on my 2015 and doing it at 50,000 miles.

Lets say you get the 1/1000 that burns a valve. A used engine can be had. A valve job could be done. And about 3 valve checks will cost you $1000 if you have a shop do it. I will take those odds after I do the first check.
 

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I have checked my 2003 DL 1000 front cylinder valve clearance with engine hot. Then after it cooled. Pretty much the same, maybe a variation on how the feelers gauge pulled through.

Learning how to use a feelers gauge is key. Most put way too much force to them. Put your feelers gauge in a book, halfway through it. Something an inch thick or so if you can still find one! Pull out the feelers gauge. That amount of resistance is the correct feel for a feelers gauge. Some valves are a bit harder to access, and it is harder to get a good "feel".

Like STCorndog, I think many owners obsess over valve adjustment. Checking them is just fine. But when they are IN SPEC according to the manufacturers service manual there is no valid point for "setting them in the middle of the range".

We don't see damage from failed valves from V Stroms. I know of a couple valvetrain problems, but both of those were caused by extreme amounts of dirt bypassing the air filter.

If you really want to get your engine running perfectly, degree your valves. Most here have no idea what that is or how to accomplish it. .001-.002" either way can dramatically change the valve timing. Especially important on engines with multiple intake and exhaust valves. Getting them to open and close EXACTLY the same makes a difference in torque output.
 
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