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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, just looking for any general advice from everyone. :confused: I'm planning on doing my first long(ish) trip on the Strom. I'll be going from Buford, Ga to Ft. Lauderdale Florida. A little shy of 700 Miles.. I've done a trip to Panama City, Fl. but it wasn't near the distance or hours in the saddle as this trip will be & was on a FZ6R. I will also be riding Solo pretty much the whole way.
I've got my Frogg Toggs ready to go, fresh oil in the motor and on the chain, trunk & a bag to strap on my seat.
I've driven this route dozens of times over the past 2-3 years in my truck, just never on a bike.

Thanks for any and all advice!! :thumbup:
 

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Hydrate, eat light, stretch your legs every 2 hours or so. If you feel like your losing your focus, ie: riding safely, park and walk around for a few minutes.

Enjoy it!
 

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Make sure you have everything you need to keep you comfortable, a cheap back supporter/strap will help with good posture. Is this all in one day? If so it will be a long day for your first long ride.....start early. Hydrate and have good protein snacks, stretch, and have a good selection of music if you ride with an mp3.

Enjoy the journey. :hurray:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yea I was planning on using my camelbak & gonna load up my shuffle & my phone.
It will be a long day, but I'm on the road Alot.. Put 47,000 miles on my truck last year & another 7,000 on my previous bike. So I'm used to entertaining myself.
 

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Allow yourself two days.

Not that you'll need it, just to give you some psychological space.

I've almost gotten myself into some trouble with Get-there-itis.

What's the longest previous day you've ridden?
 

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And in addition to what has already been said...

Carry the best motorcycle toolbox you can have, a Mastercard or Visa Card with a large limit.

Oh, and I always have a towing package for my bike. Mine is though the AMA.
 

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Never be in a hurry to get there, and never be in a hurry to get home. That is the best advice I can give ya.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Allow yourself two days.

Not that you'll need it, just to give you some psychological space.

I've almost gotten myself into some trouble with Get-there-itis.

What's the longest previous day you've ridden?
The longest day I've had was 6hrs in the saddle on a waay less comfortable bike.
In a vehicle 14hrs driving.
I'm definitely in no hurry to get down there & as for the trip back, I have no reason to get home at any certain time. I will be well rested for both trips as well.
When I travel I normally have at least $200 cash & my cards have high limits since I have good credit (not bragging).

I really appreciate all the info that has been given so far. Very reassuring to what I was thinking already, but also informative on some new things.
 

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Hydrate, eat light, stretch your legs every 2 hours or so. If you feel like your losing your focus, ie: riding safely, park and walk around for a few minutes.

Enjoy it!
Great advice!!!

The trick to riding long distances in a day, like the Iron Butt rides, or what you are trying, is to keep the wheels turning. It's very easy to lose time at a gas stop, lunch stop, "oh, looky there" stop, etc. You have to balance that rule against taking enough time to stretch and relaxe your muscles, so you'll have to find the balance.

What works for me:

-Cut out the caffeine a week before the trip, and while on the trip. (This happened two years ago while on vacation with the stomach flu. Amazing a few days later when driving home how fast the trip was when I didn't feel like stopping for food, or normal drinks - coffee and Coke. In addition, I truly like how I feel not addicted to caffeine now. FYI) Caffeine makes you need the bathroom, often before you need a fuel stop.

-Cut out carbonated drinks while on the trip. Don't know why, but I can drink much more water before needing a "rest stop" than I can with just small amounts of carbonated drinks. With just water, I can wait as long as the bike has fuel, a couple hundred miles.

-Don't take the time to remove helmet when fueling or using the bathroom. Sure you'll look like a dork, but these people don't know you, or will ever see you again.

-Tunes are great, but talk radio, comedy stations, books on tape are better. Get you engaged in the topic and your mind busy on the words, and time passes so fast.

-Figure out when you are not sharp during a normal day, and try to arrange your schedule to not drive then. I like driving the interstates during the wee hours of the morning. Traffic is light, it's not too hot in the summer, and sunrises really are magical. This is at the risk of deer, so use your judgment as to time of the year and location, as sometimes the risk is greater.

-Try to adjust your schedule to miss rush hours in cities.

-IMPORTANT: Decide before the ride that getting there today is optional. That way if you get tired, have mechanical issues, see an accident and want to help, etc., than you can! If it is critically important that you get there today, than leave yesterday. As you get close to the goal, or after being in the saddle for most of a day, you can't trust your judgment as much as you can before the trip.

-Drink enough water. Have a way to safely drink water while riding. If you don't need to use the bathroom at each fuel stop, drink more water. If your urine is yellow, or worse dark, drink more water. You body will hurt your efforts if it runs low on water, and other drinks really are not a good substitute.

-Eat light. I pack low carb protein bars, jerky nuggets, nuts in a way that is reasonable to reach while riding. These foods don't give you highs or crashes, and can replace meals.

-Avoid big greasy heavy foods.

-If you need a break, take it. Make it a meal if you must, but with the above that may not be needed. Find a place to hike a little, climb stairs, stretch legs and excessive. Those things are not well done in a restaurant.

-Make sure your bike fits you. Bars, seat, pegs etc. A little discomfort on short rides will be big on long rides.


Now, your 700 mile ride, at an average speed of 50 mph, will take 14 hours. Speeding a lot will burn more fuel and add to the gas stops, and possibly lost time with the highway patrol. So, I call this a wash. Speed if you want, but it may not reduce your travel time. Stop for meals and you are looking at 15-16+ hours. Get stuck in rush hour, and you're at 16-18+ hours. So find the time of day that works for you and the route, and go with the understanding that you can stop for the day at any part along the trip, because you don't have to get there today.

After you do a few of them, it really becomes second nature.
 

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Aleve

sun glasses, ear plugs, sun screen, talcum powder on your nether regions front and rear. Seamless undies or boxer briefs

Coffee

Powerbar ish snacks

Leave early 5 hours 1 hr break 2 hours 20 minute break roll there
 

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Comfort - I've found that wearing running shorts with a moisture wicking liner is good. Get's the moisture away from ya and puts a slippery material 'tween you and your riding pants/jeans. No chafing. I just get the cheap one's at Target. You can rinse 'em out anywhere and they'll dry overnight. 2 pair and you're good to go.
 

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Lube the chain every second fillup, or more if it's making noise.

Check tires on occasion. Getting a flat at speed is not a good situation. If the bike starts to feel squirrelly at any point, get to the side of the road and be careful how you use the brakes. Better to coast to a stop if possible, or gear down.

Bike inspection is a good idea too. Check for loose bolts on brakes, clutch lever and rear brake lever. Make sure all your lights are working as well as horn.

It wouldn't hurt to bring a spare set of levers and shift lever in case the bike falls over, and tools to swap them out.

Charge up your cell phone before you depart.

A box of power bars is good for energy, if you eat those.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I definitely plan on getting a tire patch kit. Misc 'catch all' tools stay in my bag that will go with me, as well as a blow out/basic first aid kit.

I like being able to see everyone's techniques & what you all do the same/different. Very helpful.

Does anyone know if there's a good place to mount that tractor tool tube anywhere if you don't have side racks? I have a tire pump on my MTN bike that I'm going to put on my crashbars when they get in. Thought about putting the tube up there but I think it'll look gaudy..
 

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Lots of really good info here!
Personally, I stay away from caffein and carbs. Stop and rest/stretch when you feel the least bit tired or loss of concentration. DO NOT BE IN A HURRY. Enjoy the journey/experience.
Even though you have traveled this route many times before, be ready for the unexpected.
Have fun.
 

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.
I would agree that large, irregular dollops of carbs (particularly sugars) are best avoided.

The science in recent years [athlete studies, and in military personnel] points to the good value of caffeine in small amounts, to help alertness. You don't need very much ~ perhaps the equivalent of 4 or five standard coffees spread over the day.
Of course, that alertness should be directed to the road, rather than to other distractions!
(Also, if you are already a coffee/caffeine fiend, it is best to continue with your usual level of "fixes" . . . since now is not the time to cut back to what non-fiends would consider normal.)

Good luck. You've done the journey before ~ but it's always much more memorable an adventure when "al fresco" on two wheels.

* On a (back)side note, I reckon standing up on the foot pegs for half a mile every ten miles, does go a long way to prevent the onset of the dreaded bum-rot.
.
 

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wow ,

thats alot of free info that im sure took years to learn!! Ive been riding over 20 years but not to much doing long rides. THANKS TO ALL!!!
 

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A good Strommer like Doug along the route would be beneficial! :thumbup:
 

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I usually try to do 700-750 miles on the first day of a long trip (say 15-30 days). This is not an easy day. 700 miles on a bike is a lot more tiring than in a car. All the above is good advice...but remember you will be tired, you will be ready to get off the bike. Your butt will be sore and in need of a break. It will take longer than in your car (more gas stops, longer breaks).

Just be as mentally prepared for the trip as you are physically prepared. And have fun...enjoy the journey. I find myself enjoying just riding somewhere as much or more than I enjoy the destination. Relax, and don't get stressed out, it will make the trip more enjoyable.

Should be a good trip...good luck, and have a good time.
 

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Aleve

sun glasses, ear plugs, sun screen, talcum powder on your nether regions front and rear. Seamless undies or boxer briefs

Coffee

Powerbar ish snacks

Leave early 5 hours 1 hr break 2 hours 20 minute break roll there
Underwear is a very important consideration for long days in the saddle. NO COTTON, I use LDComfort undergear, no seams, fabric wicks moisture away. peddle bike shorts work well too

personally I stay away from drugs like naproxin, ibuprophen etc. they only mask the symptom, get the ergonomics on your bike adjusted and modified best you can for all day comfort

I could also repeat a lot of boatpuller's good advice especially about caffeine, soft drinks, food, ergonomics & pace, the only disagreement I have with him is taking helmet off at stops, I always take my helmet off, never pay at pump, that makes for 2 walks to the casher to pay, stretch yer legs, and stretch yer face

the other this it learn to recognize when your tires. if your wishy washy about decisions, should I stop for gas now ? how much further can I make it, YOUR TIRED and should stop for a rest



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Hey guys, just looking for any general advice from everyone. :confused: I'm planning on doing my first long(ish) trip on the Strom. I'll be going from Buford, Ga to Ft. Lauderdale Florida. A little shy of 700 Miles.. I've done a trip to Panama City, Fl. but it wasn't near the distance or hours in the saddle as this trip will be & was on a FZ6R. I will also be riding Solo pretty much the whole way.
I've got my Frogg Toggs ready to go, fresh oil in the motor and on the chain, trunk & a bag to strap on my seat.
I've driven this route dozens of times over the past 2-3 years in my truck, just never on a bike.

Thanks for any and all advice!! :thumbup:
Buy yourself a large bottle of "Anti-Monkey-Butt Powder" and apply it to your underwear and your backside at every stop....and no, I'm not kidding; it's a real product and it really works.
 
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