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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After talking with my wife I will not be upgrading and am going to do a complete service aside from the valve check.

Bike Info: 2012 DL650A, 2500 miles, last service was last year and I just did fluid top off. I am the original owner. Garage kept. Gas has probably been left in the tank every season, but not full. I want to be as safe as I can and keep my bike riding as long as I can.

What I intend to do:
Change Oil and Filter
Drain and replace brake fluid
Drain and replace coolant
Change oil filter
Check chain and clean with kerosene (what do you use to lube the chain?)
Run seafoam through the tank (the service department was worried about the fuel filter?

Questions?
Do I have to change the brake lines just because they are 4 years old?
Do I need to change the brake pads because of age?
The tires are the ones that came with it when I bought it new the code says they are 9 years old, I have not seen any dry rot, should I swap these out?
Where do you get your parts and oils?

Am I missing anything? The local dealer wanted an estimated 500$ and I thought it was too much.

Thank you for helping me grow as a rider and owner.

-Chris
 

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After talking with my wife I will not be upgrading and am going to do a complete service aside from the valve check.

Bike Info: 2012 DL650A, 2500 miles, last service was last year and I just did fluid top off. I want to be as safe as I can and keep my bike riding as long as I can.

What I intend to do:
Change Oil and Filter
Drain and replace brake fluid
Drain and replace coolant
Change oil filter
Check chain and clean with kerosene (what do you use to lube the chain?)
Run seafoam through the tank (the service department was worried about the fuel filter?

Questions?
Do I have to change the brake lines just because they are 4 years old?
Do I need to change the brake pads because of age?
The tires are the ones that came with it when I bought it new the code says they are 9 years old, I have not seen any dry rot, should I swap these out?
Where do you get your parts and oils?

Am I missing anything? The local dealer wanted an estimated 500$ and I thought it was too much.

Thank you for helping me grow as a rider and owner.

-Chris
Tyres do go hard with age. Consider replacing them.
Brake lines also perish with age but I suspect I'm the only person here that can report an over aged brake line bursting, and that was on a BMW not a Japanese bike.
Brake pads don't age.
DON NOT DRAIN THE BRAKE FLUID. It is critical that there is no air in the brake lines. Use an old turkey baster or syringe to suck the fluid out of the reservoirs then refill with new fluid. I suggest using one that is a different colour to the original so it's easier to tell when you have pumped it through and displaced the old stuff. I alternate amber and blue, but the colours as such are irrelevant, just don't get air in the system. There are many videos on youtube on how to do it, watch several before you open anything.
 

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If the dealer will ACTUALLY do all this for $500 then pay the man...if it includes the questions? section.

"What I intend to do:
Change Oil and Filter
Drain and replace brake fluid
Drain and replace coolant
Change oil filter
Check chain and clean with kerosene (what do you use to lube the chain?)
Run seafoam through the tank (the service department was worried about the fuel filter?

Questions?
Do I have to change the brake lines just because they are 4 years old?
Do I need to change the brake pads because of age?
The tires are the ones that came with it when I bought it new the code says they are 9 years old, I have not seen any dry rot, should I swap these out?
Where do you get your parts and oils?"

2500 miles is barely broken in on these bikes. Some will tell you MUST do brake lines and tires and some will even insist on brake pad replacement. I believe Suzuki says to replace brake lines at 4 years as a CYA thing. Many people have done fine with much older tires, brake lines and pads.

If your the type of person that sleeps better at night getting it all done than go for it. If your comfortable taking risks, however minor, than you are the only person that can decide. I would suggest the following at a minimum...

Oil and filter=Yes.
Replace brake fluid=Yes, every two years.
Brake pads=No, unless worn down.
Coolant=Yes, long life every 4 years + -.
Clean chain=up to you, cleaning not really required. I use 90w gear oil others use a whole plethora of other products.
Seafoam=sure but plan on doing the fuel filter bypass soon. You can make your own "seafoam" like product from common shop supplies.
Tires=everyone is going to insist you replace them. Again, that's up to you. I ran on a 12 year old set, started out with 3000 km and went to 15,000km with no issues...but I'm a risk taker...and cheap!
 

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There is really no need to add additives to your gas like Seafoam, especially if you don’t have any problem. And if you do it’s probably not going to fix it, either.
I know the manual says to replace brake lines every four years but this seems a bit excessive to me. Maybe if the bike was parked in full sun year round? Brake fluid on the other hand, definitely, or at least bleed regularity to replace the fluid closest to the caliper which gets contaminated.
 

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What I intend to do:
Change Oil and Filter
Drain and replace brake fluid
Drain and replace coolant
Change oil filter
Check chain and clean with kerosene (what do you use to lube the chain?)
Run seafoam through the tank (the service department was worried about the fuel filter?
My Experience - I NEVER USE ANY SOLVENTS TO 'CLEAN' MY CHAIN. Solvents can and will remove the lubricants behind the chain O rings causing the chain to fail prematurely. Just ask me how I know this :frown2: I use NAPA Chain and Cable Lube to both 'clean' and lube the chain at the same time.

My History - I have a ZRX1200 with a chain that has over 30,000 miles on the clock and have never used a solvent to 'clean' the chain. I lubed the chain every other fuel fill up.

Your experience may vary.
 

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The only thing it does not include was the tires.
Then I say do everything your are capable of doing yourself first with the exception of the tires and brake lines.

Get comfortable and confident with working on your own bike, come to this site and YouTube often for refresher training for whatever it is you are working on. Fork oil change was not on your list but you may want to consider doing that in the coming months or hold off until your other priorities are taken care of. I'm still running my original 11 year old brake lines and have no intention of changing them until they fail or I see visible signs of deterioration.

You can always take your bike to the shop for the maintenance that is beyond your capability after doing as much as possible yourself.

My next projects are fork oil change and steering head bearing upgrade. Neither of these things are keeping me form riding the bike, they're just on my list of "to do's" and I'll sleep better knowing they're done. They wouldn't be getting done if I had to pay a shop, so I'm doing them myself.
 

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Tyres do go hard with age. Consider replacing them.
Brake lines also perish with age but I suspect I'm the only person here that can report an over aged brake line bursting, and that was on a BMW not a Japanese bike.
Brake pads don't age.
DON NOT DRAIN THE BRAKE FLUID. It is critical that there is no air in the brake lines. Use an old turkey baster or syringe to suck the fluid out of the reservoirs then refill with new fluid. I suggest using one that is a different colour to the original so it's easier to tell when you have pumped it through and displaced the old stuff. I alternate amber and blue, but the colours as such are irrelevant, just don't get air in the system. There are many videos on youtube on how to do it, watch several before you open anything.
As an alternative to extracting brake fluid with a turkey baster, flush the brake system, front and rear. Trying to suck the fluid out will still leave old BF in the lines, calipers and ABS. This can be a messy job, and you want to be sure to avoid getting any BF on painted surfaces. Lotsa how-to's on brake bleeding on YouTube and in Clymer or Haines-type manuals. and of course the big ol' official Suzuki Shop Manual.
If you don't have at least one of those manuals and the tools, and preparations they recommend, I would suggest leaving that job to a shop, but it should be done, as moisture-contaminated old brake fluid can cause degradation of internal brake components and performance.
 

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Tires age and start to harden. They loose flexibility and that leads to cracking. Once you start putting the mileage on they will start cracking. Plan on changing them sooner than later. Six years is usually the limit. Look around and see what is out there and what fits your riding style. Have a look here
And at the other tire videos he has. Even when the tires he's reviewing are not up your alley he imparts a lot of good knowledge. Also listen to the April 12th show here https://adventureriderradio.com/listen the second half is a tire expert that cover a lot of ground also.
 

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As an alternative to extracting brake fluid with a turkey baster, flush the brake system, front and rear. Trying to suck the fluid out will still leave old BF in the lines, calipers and ABS. This can be a messy job, and you want to be sure to avoid getting any BF on painted surfaces. Lotsa how-to's on brake bleeding on YouTube and in Clymer or Haines-type manuals. and of course the big ol' official Suzuki Shop Manual.
If you don't have at least one of those manuals and the tools, and preparations they recommend, I would suggest leaving that job to a shop, but it should be done, as moisture-contaminated old brake fluid can cause degradation of internal brake components and performance.
That would be why I told him to watch the videos. The turkey baster/syringe is just to save having to pump the whole lot of old fluid IN THE RESERVOIR through the system.
 

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That would be why I told him to watch the videos. The turkey baster/syringe is just to save having to pump the whole lot of old fluid IN THE RESERVOIR through the system.
I apologize Dark, I misread your post thinking that emptying the reservoir was the only thing being done.:serious:
 

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I apologize Dark, I misread your post thinking that emptying the reservoir was the only thing being done.:serious:
Oh Dog no. That would be a complete waste of time.
I picked up the idea of using the turkey baster working on my BMW. It has four fluid reservoirs (and nine bleed points all up), two of which are under the tank. Using the baster to empty the reservoirs and then refilling with clean fluid before pumping the new stuff through to flush the lines and calipers makes the overall job much quicker. If you let air into the system on an ABS Strom you're in for a bad time bleeding it out unless you have the PC adaptor and software to actuate the ABS servos ... speaking of which I should dig mine out of storage.
 

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Do you guys get your parts from the dealer or does advanced Auto have most of them?
Who's "Advanced Auto"?
The oil filters need to be the right ones for the bike, the thread is different to most car targeted items. Either genuine of K&N there are my personal choice.
Air filters need to be the right ones as well, not a generic item. Either genuine or Unifilter.
Oil can be bought anywhere as can brake fluid, just stick to the specs in the handbook.
Spark plugs ... I like NGK iridium. Again, personal preference.
 

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Who's "Advanced Auto"?
The oil filters need to be the right ones for the bike, the thread is different to most car targeted items. Either genuine of K&N there are my personal choice.
Air filters need to be the right ones as well, not a generic item. Either genuine or Unifilter.
Oil can be bought anywhere as can brake fluid, just stick to the specs in the handbook.
Spark plugs ... I like NGK iridium. Again, personal preference.

@Dark Angel; Advanced Auto is one of our automotive parts franchise networks.
@Cfield: I would recommend a motorcycle-specific motor oil, as they have additives formulated to work with wet clutches. I use Suzuki Ecstar R9000 10w40 in mine. You could also add K&N to the list of air filters.
Brake fluid is up to you. I flushed my brake systems out with NAPA DOT4. Regardless of brand, always start with a fresh unopened container, and keep it covered as best you can during the flush/fill process, both at the reservoir and the container. Moisture is its mortal enemy. And don't get it on painted parts, it is a very effective paint remover.
I order this oil change Kit on Amazon. They also have mineral oil, semi synthetic oil and 4-quart kits as well.
https://smile.amazon.com/Suzuki-Change-Quarts-Synthetic-SV650/dp/B071ZK5KKP/ref=sr_1_6?ascsubtag=1ba00-01000-org00-mac00-other-smile-us000-gatwy-feature-SEARC&keywords=suzuki+ecstar+oil&pd_rd_r=e8a9c6dc-b788-490c-8597-706212b03cf0&pd_rd_w=4Ng87&pd_rd_wg=93z5V&pf_rd_p=b03d0971-25b7-4bb0-83de-a791e6ddb826&pf_rd_r=JAGHEX77G3FFQARVYBZK&pid=eMdADGN&qid=1559934269&s=gateway&sr=1-6-catcorr&vehicle=2017-1-17292-20-----14124------&vehicleName=2017+Suzuki+DL650A+V-Strom+ABS
 

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Where are you located for $500 I'll


Do and oil/filter change
Flush the brakes
Check the coolant
Clean and lube the chain
Furnish and install new Shinko 705's
Top up the gas tank
Clean the windscreen

As a bonus I'll give you $20 bill to go out and get lunch while I work on the bike and still pocket $250 to $275 for a few hours work.
 

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"replace brake lines at 4 years "

Boy am I in trouble. I ain't never changed a brake line even on a BMW I put 210K miles on. Changed the pads when they wore out.
It wasn't until a year ago or so that I changed the fluid on the 04 Wee. That made a bit of an improvement.
With so few miles on the OP's bike very little should be in question except for the tires. But like everything else, tires are better now that when all we had was bias ply. Though old if the bike was kept inside they may perform adequately. Getting new would bring piece of mind though.
 
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