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Discussion Starter #1
Back in Spring 2006 I bought my DRZ400s and eventually my Strom in the Fall.

Not having owned a bike in years, and never having "proper gear" as a teen, I bought a pair of heavy duty hiking boots for use on the DRZ. Later touring on the Strom I bought a nice pair of Matrix II boots, to handle wet weather and offer a motorcycle specific protection. I'm now on my second set of Matrix II boots and I've put 53,000 miles on my Strom.

My wife road the DRZ around the lawn and then took the MSF course to get her license a few years ago. After getting her license and riding my Strom she wouldn't get on the DRZ again, so we bought a second Strom, which she's put 11,000 miles on. Our last trip upto the Gaspe Peninsula went over a lot of road construction and she now feels pretty confident on he Strom. I was impressed when she road diagonally across four inches of steaming unrolled fresh pavement just outside of Quebec City, when a road crew decided that was when we should be entering the road. I went through it first and thought I was roosting her with hot tar.

This year I decided we both still had more to learn on the "dirt bike", and I bought a DR200s so that she would have a "smaller" offroad bike and the extra confidence that goes with it. I intend for us to do more schooling offroad this summer and build up a strong skill base for both myself and my wife.

Last weekend we went out and purchased a his and hers pair of my first real offroad boot. We tried breaking them in around the house, and although stiff they are very comfortable.

So this morning I decided I would give them a test ride in on the bike. With tempuratures just below 30F, I had my HT2.0 pants and liners on. They just fit over the boots and I found that limited my movement somewhat. However the real problem is upshifting. The sales guy warned us that the rear break would feel overly strong, so I was careful with that. Breaking and downshifting didn't seem to be much of an issue at all. But getting my foot under the shifter proved nearly impossible.

Not being smart enough to first test while safely on the center stand, my first shift was heading up the road. The first few gears I shifted using the edge of the sole. Then I just twisted my foot around to hook under the shifter and tap it up, not really on the peg. Eventually I discovered I could twist around and get my foot under the shifter while still on the peg. However when it was in the "correct" position I couldn't really release the shifter low enough to get multiple shifts in. So each gear involved a shift and then extracting my toe so the lever could fall back down enough for the next shift. Standing didn't seem to offer me a significant advantage, although it was slightly easier to get the toe down. Another problem I found was that the top of the boot provides no feeling, so it was easy to be applying enough pressure to speed shift while getting into position for my next upshift. So twenty miles later I'm at work and thinking how much that felt like I was a complete newbie.

On my DRZ I assume I will adjust the shifter a little higher, and that the boots will loosen up more as they "break in".

Anything else that might make this a little easier on me, or more importantly my wife! Lets just say that she wasn't for buying a fourth bike, and is just now coming around to think it could be fun to do some "trail riding". Having her feel awkward is really the opposite direction that I was looking for. But I also want to ensure we are using reasonable safety gear, as I'll feel horrible if she breaks a leg or ankle.

So am I just being a wimp and need to suck it up and learn to cope, or are there some tricks I should know that will help? Obviously I could go buy even better boots, but lets assume that I'm too cheap to spend more than what I just bought. In case it matters because somehow I've chosen really poorly, I bought Answer MODE boots.
 

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I ride with these boots..... and when I had the stock shift lever, I had to adjust it to get my toe under it.






Eventually, I changed to this lever and it helped even more.

 

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Boots

I have the same boots as Big John
Wear them and wear them some more
Walk around the yard, do yard work ect. You will get used to them fast
I had the same problem last spring, now I can't ride without them.
The first time a branch or rock hits them you'll know why you got them.
Rick
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Those are Enduro boots or Motocross boots. The same basic design applies but a smoother sole is used in Motocross and a more lugged sole for Enduro.
 

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To get the flexibility you require on a dual sport (DL650 anyway) you need to get these http://www.etcycles.com/Boots.html (or something like them) which are designed to be more flexible for precise shifting and more comfortable walking. Downside, they give a little less protection. Your choise.
 

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Adjust your shifter so it sits higher.

You didn't specify which bike you have...
The dl650 has an adjuster for shifter height.
If the dl1000 doesn't have one, remove the shifter, and move it up by one spline on the shaft.

That should solve your problem.
 

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So what's with this lever?
What does it accomplish and how does it do it?
Vee or Wee?
Wee, folding (so it don't break when it rolls of the kick stand), and might be longer (to fit big feet or boots)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Adjust your shifter so it sits higher.

You didn't specify which bike you have...
The dl650 has an adjuster for shifter height.
If the dl1000 doesn't have one, remove the shifter, and move it up by one spline on the shaft.

That should solve your problem.
We both have DL650s, but the main use of this boot will be for a DRZ400s and DR200s (his and hers).

On the DR* bikes I'm fine with moving the shifter up. We're unlikely to use these boots on the Strom very often as we have Matrix II boots that work well for us there.

I expected it to feel odd, but I wasn't really prepared for how difficult it really was on the Strom. I think the boots will break in and get much easier to use. I'll concentrate on that.

On the plus side when I reported the awkwardness to my wife she didn't seem put off by it. She said that the DR200 would be new to her so having all the awkwardness at once shouldn't be too bad. I love my wife, and no she doesn't have any sisters!
 

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My low-tech solution

I have big boots too, and I found it hard to get the toe of the boot between the peg and the shifter. I did two things:

1) Dragged the boot along the ground for a bit at about 30 mph -- nicely wore off about 1/4 inch of tread.

2) Removed the footpeg rubber...probably good for 3/8 of an inch more.

Now the boots fit the bike perfectly. I'm thinking of putting the footpeg rubber back, people are always reminding me that it's gone...
 

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shifting in boots

Ditto on raising the height of the shift lever. This will help. It will likely be a lot better when your boots break-in too. New boots are typically too stiff to work well. Wear them while working aroung the house, mow the yard, etc. to speed up break-in.

And I'm sure it's too late now- but the SIDI Crossfires or another quality boot with a hinged ankle is the bomb. The SIDIs are almost comfortable enough to wear all the time. The are truly fantastic boots. If you get in the mood to purchase some SIDIs check out their boot that is the same style but is lighter and less expensive (can't remember what they are called). A couple of my riding friends have these and say they are just as good as the Crossfires. It is what I'll be buying next. The SIDIs cost me about $400 + tax; which is very high. But they last a long time and almost all of their parts are modular and can be replaced- so they represent a good value for me.

Hope that helps.
 

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Shift lever adjustment for DL1000

I have to disagree with one poster regarding shift lever adjustment on the DL1000. At least for my 07, there is indeed a means of fine adjustment. Loosen the two 10mm jam nuts (the rear one is reverse-threaded), rotate the rod to the desired lever height, and retighten. Easy even for me, and what a difference a little extra lever height makes. I prefer this adjustment to a spline shift on the shaft, because that would require greater linear force from the rod to rotate the shaft.
 

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I have to disagree with one poster regarding the shift lever adjustment for the DL1000, at least for my 07. Loosen the two 10mm jam nuts (the rear one is reverse-threaded), rotate the rod to the desired lever height, and retighten. Easy even for me, and what a difference a little extra lever height makes. Tedious as I am, I prefer this adjustment to a spline shift on the shaft, because that would alter the required linear force from the rod to rotate the shaft.
+1 on that mountainmeterman; Adjusting the the shifter height at the spline may leave you without enough travel to make either the up shifts or the downshifts. :thumbdown:
 

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Eventually, I changed to this lever and it helped even more.

[/QUOTE]

Hey Big John,

Is that a Touratech lever - if so did it help out with your shifting??
I just got some Fly Racing ATV boots and like others found that upshifting was challenging.
I am going to try moving the shift lever up and seeing if that helps.

Also has anyone tried the Pivot Pegz on the DL1000??
Wondering if that may help also.

DK
 

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last week I removed the rubbers from the pegs.
can't even tell it's not there.
LOTS more room (the rubber is about 5/8 thick).
the bare pegs slope toward the bike so your foot actually stays on better .
cheap fix!
 

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If you need the protection, meaning you ride stuff more technical than fire roads and single track, suck it up and ride. You'll be amazed how fast you get used to the stiff boots. I have a DR350S (first bike) that I rode with steel toe work boots for both street and dirt for a long time until I bought a pair of used motocross riding boots at the swap meet. First ride I didn't think I'd get used to them. Second ride I was fine, and actually kinda prefer them now and like the peace of mind if I'm doing stuff that scares me. I think I should have adjusted the height of the shifter, but I never got around to it.

But for point-to-point, like if we are taking the fire roads over the mountains to the next town for lunch, I'm in my steel toe work boots. I love Red Wing. The ones I have now are the 5290 at about $120. I'm pretty happy with them as I can wear them all day at work and on the weekends, but the shank is not stiff enough for my kick-start DR. However, if you want the ultimate work boot for the motorcycle, IMO, the Red Wing 2426 is the way to go. Super stiff steel shank. Linemen stand on pegs all day in this boot. This is based solely on reading the specs and trying them on and walking around in the store, as I have not been able to justify the $285 price tag yet.
 
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