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Discussion Starter #1
This morning i mounted a 205 50R/17 General Altimax Artic on the rear of the V Strom. Today I rode about 150 miles of mostly mountain twisties (dragon and Cherohala Skyway). Some dry roads and some wet roads and even a couple of miles of a muddy/gravel road with some tight turns and grade changes.

I have a Tourance on the front and removed a Tourance from the rear to put the CT on. The CT requires " just a little bit" more counter-steering to get the bike tipped over. At first the bike felt wobbly when leaned over but, that was corrected by dialing in a a few more clicks of rebound and compression damping on my Ohlins shock. The CT is much heavier then a MC tire. I agree with Randyo who stated that an aftermarket shock is a big help with a CT. I think the stock shock would be overwhelmed. The damping adjustment settled things down and the bike feels about 95% as good as it did with the MC tire. I may change that to 110% as good after some more saddle time with the CT

Although I did not push too hard, as this was my first ride with the CT, traction seemed better then the Tourance. I can feel the Tourance start to slip on hard corner exit acceleration. The CT did not slip while acceleration hard out of corners. Also off pavement traction was notably better although the extra weight caused the suspension to not work as well over rough terrain.

Why did I do this? 90% of my riding is in the mountains at a sporting-semi sporting pace. I was killing rear MC tires every 2500 miles. That gets expensive. Several people here who obviously know what they are talking about have reported good results with CT's. I had to try it. Glad that i did. Thanks to those who took the heat and reported their findings.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I shroud add that mounting the CT was considerably more difficult then mounting a MC tire. I used a ratchet strap over a 2x4 block to hold the beads in the drop center then used my no mar bar as usual. It took me maybe 20 minutes after getting the procedure down. I can do a MC tie in 3 minutes.
 

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I used my knees to keep the tire in the center.
Found it easy to mount the CT.
Mike
 

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"Fist Ride on the Dark Side?"

Geez dude, this is a family-safe website.

(Not that there's anything wrong with that...)
It seems some guys are just a bit more hard-core than others.
 

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Why did I do this? 90% of my riding is in the mountains at a sporting-semi sporting pace. I was killing rear MC tires every 2500 miles. That gets expensive. Several people here who obviously know what they are talking about have reported good results with CT's. I had to try it. Glad that i did. Thanks to those who took the heat and reported their findings.
Let's hope that your side walls last as long as the tread. You are, by far, a braver man than I.
 

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The side wall never touches the road.
No, but putting that tire on a motorcycle, causes the side wall to flex in ways that it was never designed for. That's the only way that the flat tread cross section can maintain contact with the road when you lean into a turn.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No, but putting that tire on a motorcycle, causes the side wall to flex in ways that it was never designed for. That's the only way that the flat tread cross section can maintain contact with the road when you lean into a turn.
I am sure that you are correct but, that is not to say that it does not work well in practice within reasonable limitations.
 

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Not saying that it doesn't work well in practice. But what would keep me awake at night, would be the chance that the sidewall might overheat or weaken over time and blow out one day while you are chasing the Dragon. :yikes:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not saying that it doesn't work well in practice. But what would keep me awake at night, would be the chance that the sidewall might overheat or weaken over time and blow out one day while you are chasing the Dragon. :yikes:
That could happen but, it could and has happened to people on motorcycle tires as well. Bottom line: motorcycles are dangerous. We have to decide what we are comfortable with. Nothing is for everyone.
 

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That could happen but, it could and has happened to people on motorcycle tires as well. Bottom line: motorcycles are dangerous. We have to decide what we are comfortable with. Nothing is for everyone.
As long as your eyes are wide open, you can decide whether the benefits outweigh the risks. Its all about risk management. And in this case, that risk could include negating your insurance coverage.

Good luck!
 

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No, but putting that tire on a motorcycle, causes the side wall to flex in ways that it was never designed for.
its a radial tire, side walls are designed to flex, the reason they look squishy on a car compared to a bias ply, also the reason radials run higher pressure than bias ply and the reason they handle better and get better fuel economy


sidewalls on radial tires are specificly designed to flex, a 500lb motorcycle puts nowhere near the stress that a 4000 lb cage puts on a tire, on the straight or in a corner



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Car tire sidewalls are designed for flex evenly. They are also designed to flex latterally. In both cases, the tread remains parallel to the tire beads.

When a car tire is mounted on a motorcycle, one sidewall is compressed and the other sidewall is stretched. Sport bikes can lean up to 45 degrees (or more). That means that the sidewalls have to be compressed and stretched so that the tread is at a 45 degree angle to the bead.

That's a lot more distortion of the tire casing than just flexing.
 

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Turn with a car tire on a bike and the tread does not stay flat on the road. It doesn't seem to stay on the correct side of the yellow line either.

 

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Be interesting to see a similar video taken in the twisties at highway speeds.
 

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Car tire sidewalls are designed for flex evenly. They are also designed to flex latterally. In both cases, the tread remains parallel to the tire beads.

When a car tire is mounted on a motorcycle, one sidewall is compressed and the other sidewall is stretched. Sport bikes can lean up to 45 degrees (or more). That means that the sidewalls have to be compressed and stretched so that the tread is at a 45 degree angle to the bead.

That's a lot more distortion of the tire casing than just flexing.
Apparently, you've never seen up close pictures of a car tire, when it's cornering very hard - you'd be shocked to find out that the sidewalls often get scuffed....car tires are designed to do this, and survive to the next corner -wash rinse repeat.



Same difference, different attack approach.............


 

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Discussion Starter #18
As long as your eyes are wide open, you can decide whether the benefits outweigh the risks. Its all about risk management. And in this case, that risk could include negating your insurance coverage.

Good luck!
Do you know of an instance where insurance was negated by the use of a CT or are you just talking out your ass?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Turn with a car tire on a bike and the tread does not stay flat on the road. It doesn't seem to stay on the correct side of the yellow line either.

No it does not stay flat but, the contact patch is obviously greater then it would be with a 150 MC tire.
 

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Do you know of an instance where insurance was negated by the use of a CT or are you just talking out your ass?
For example, in Germany, it is ILLEGAL to use a tire on your motorcycle on the AutoBahn that has not been homologated and approved by the tire manufacturer for use on your particular make and model of motorcycle - even if the tire meets the motorcycle manufacturer's original specifications.

So, for example, it would be illegal for me to run Avon Storm II Ultras on my ST1300 on the AutoBahn, even though they meet OEM specs. Because of a high profile tire failure of an earlier Avon tire model on an ST1300 that resulted in the death of a police officer, Avon does not rate any of their tires for that bike, even though they make tires to fit it, including the unusual 18 inch front.

There have been a couple of high profile failures of the new Storm II Ultra's on ST1300s which have resulted in insurance companies delaying settlement (not sure if they ever did settle in the one case that I heard about two years ago).

I don't know if you have had to deal with insurance companies, but let me put it to you this way: If your motorcycle-mounted car tire blows out and results in an accident, do you think that your insurance company would be willing to settle without a fight? That's what insurance companies do. They look for any excuse not to settle. That's how they keep rates so cheap in the con US.
 
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