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Discussion Starter #1
Rather than buy a jig like harbor freight sells, I decided to go the minimalist route using just spoons. I liked the idea of using windex for lube because of it not leaving any residue behind (I think) - more on that later. Rim savers were from a used bleach bottle.

All of the work was done at ground level first using the new tire under the wheel, then the old one. The bead broke away fine using the 3 spoon method. I believe I could have done it with just 2. Getting the 1st bead off the rim went pretty good, the other side was slightly harder.

Found alot of hard substance around the inside of the rim on both sides. I suspect this was dried up lube from previous tire changes. Took a while to get it all cleaned up. There were also a few marks and nicks in the same area, nothing bad though.

After getting the old tire off I spent a good bit of time cleaning the wheel, packing the carrier bearing with fresh grease, shimming the cush rubbers, and checking wheel balance. Surprisingly, the heavy spot turned out to be about 90 degrees from the valve stem - I marked it with duct tape. I tried rotating the sprocket to different positions but it didn't have much effect.

After getting the wheel prepped to my satisfaction, it was time to put the new rubber on. Making sure the rotation arrow on the tire was oriented right, the first side went on easily - just pushed it on most of the way and finished with a couple spoon prys. I then rotated the painted dot on the tire to the heavy spot of the wheel that I had marked with tape.

Getting the last bead on was the hardest part of the whole job. Maneuvering the beads down in the center of the rim on the opposite side I was working and keeping them there was a little tricky, I coulda used 2 more hands. It was about this time I quit worrying with trying to keep the rim savers in place and continued without them so they wouldn't disappear into the tire. Once the tire was positioned right, the last of the bead went in fairly easy.

The beads seated with less than 30 PSI and everything looked good.

For balancing, I put the wheel back on the bike without the spacers. It only took 1/4 oz for the tire to randomly stop - not bad I thought.

All the tutorials I read and watched on video helped alot and would like to thank those who contributed these (you know who you are). I only wish I had gone through them again just prior to starting the job.

Well that's it. I would encourage those who are interested to give it a try. It's really not that hard if you take the time and think it through - getting everything positioned right seems to be the key. I look forward to replacing my front tire when it's due, and suspect it will go much smoother.
 

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I like to use NoMar spoons. Have a Cycle Hill tire changer, and use spoons "alot" on tubeless & tubed tires. Use the tire changer to hold the wheel in place.

Nice Work on your first tire change! :thumbup:
 

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Nice job, it gets easier, after about the 5th tire change you start getting the hang of it. It seems to be evolutionary in that you'll come up with methods that work well for you. (Or buy a Coats machine :mrgreen:)
Small blocks of wood to push the bead into the rim well opposite the side you're spooning on work wonders, as do wood clamps at about the half to 3/4 points on the tar although I've yet to change a Strom tar.
I lost a piece of plastic I was using as a rim saver inside a front tire once and didn't realize it till I was balancing it and heard it sliding around inside the tar! :headbang: :thumbdown:
Now I count them like surgeon counts sponges.

FWIW, here's some ideas if you're cheap, it works for me.

http://i38.tinypic.com/17r3oh.jpg
http://i35.tinypic.com/hsougo.jpg

One way to break a bead.
http://i34.tinypic.com/28cdb40.jpg
http://i37.tinypic.com/16ixqw1.jpg

I balance wheels with the stick on lead weights.
The rod and centering cones are available on the NoMar site. The bearings are roller blade ABEC 5 Bearings.
http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/6899/bal1zl9.jpg
http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/3994/bal3qm2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was surprised how little space the job required, basically just me and the wheel. I guess it could be done about anywhere, like a picnic table, in the grass, inside the house. My shop is small and already crowded. If there was room, I'd have a changer and one of those NoMar spoonbars.

I have wood clamps (the wooden type) and can't believe I didn't think of them. Those and blocks will be part of the next session, thanks the tips. Putting the wheel back on the bike to balance it is a minor hassle, I can see some type of stand in the future.
 
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