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I'm a shorty and have had my 2015 650 lowered all the way. And the lowered seat.
I now have the issue of the bike is too upright. so much so I now need to get a replacement bracket for the right mirror/break leaver/break fluid reservoir. (day 2 of riding it)
anyhow.
I have read over some of the past post in regards to cutting and welding the stand(I will have to get a pro to attend to this) but was wondering what the actual angle of the factory lean was. It would help when I attempt to get this sorted, cos I don't want to be in the middle of a car park laughing my head off for laying the bike down.
Many thanks for helping
 

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Yup this bike can obviously be lowered, but it wasn't meant/designed/intended to be lowered......ensuing issues rearing their head from such are apparent.
 

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Hey there sally, aren’t you glad that the “totally I gnoring your question to tell you you’re doing it wrong” guys have chimed in?

I have no idea what the factory lean angle is or what it would be with all of your forbidden (😄) modifications. However I do remember seeing an adjustable kickstand somewhere, might that work for you?

when you do seek a welders Help perhaps they could get together some stable folks to safely lean her over until it’s right.

anyhow, best of luck and I hope to see updates on your progress with pictures!
 

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I have some experience with this on the Strom and other bikes.
We bought 2 used Stroms from a used bike dealer on consignment. I had previously ridden a stock one and knew that I would want to lower a little and for my wife as much as possible. The dealer installed 2" lowering links (turned out to be too much for me and my weight). He cut the kickstand and welded the foot back on. The work was fine and very reasonable.

When I installed a new rear tire, just that thickness caused it to rub the inner fender on minor bumps. AdventureTech (sponsor on this forum) has several sizes of lowering and raising links; the maximum that he recommends is 1 1/4" I think.

There are adjustable kickstands available ( I have the Soupy's now after raising my bike back up to the 1 1/4" from 2"). I do not recommend the Soupy's, will not go back to stock height and is aluminum. I mount the bike like a horse by standing on left footpeg and the stand just seems frail but has been fine for 40,000 miles.

My recommendation is:
1 1/4" lowering link
Adjustable kickstand. Have seen some on Amazon or ebay I think rather than Soupy's. Use Locktite on the adjustable screws.
If necessary, remove the rubber bumpers from bottom of seat (changes the seating position so I did not like it, but my wife did)
Footpeg lowering brackets if you remove seat bumpers. Relaxes the knee. I like these regardless.
Choose riding boots that have thicker sole and heel. This helps more than you would think. I can even tell when I have orthotic insoles inside or not.
Read the ground and park smart so bike does not lean too much either left or right.
 

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Reading your post, I had a thought. 1. Differing links will all require a different kickstand length and so the need to do both. If you cut the pad off, find a length of pipe to fit over your stand. With help, lean bike over to the angle you think appropriate and mark stand. You now have a pattern to help your fabricator.
 

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My 2012 DL 650 has a lean angle of 77 degrees while on the side stand. That isn't what each one will have as there will be differences in preload settings on both front and rear, tires ( both in wear and size/brand), and added equipment. But that 77 degrees works very well and would serve to fix your problem.
Cutting and rewelding the side stand is the only proper fix. All a part of making the bike work for you, not against you!
 

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My 04 Wee leans too much and I tried one of those fancy adjustable stands. It seemed to be missing the tang that presses on the stand switch which makes it useless. So getting your shortened shouldn't be a problem. Good welder can help you figure that out quickly.
 

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Get some planks of wood, roll both wheels up on them then put the bike on the stand, add or subtract bits of wood, when your happy with the angle measure the planks of wood, the height of the wood will be the same as what the stand needs to be shortened.

If you don't need much grinding some away from the stop will allow the stand to go a little further forward this will also shorten the stand, a big problem with doing that is you must lean the bike to the right to get the stand up and down.

You should put teflon plumbers tape under your brake and clutch perch, the tape will allow them to stay in place but spin when they hit the ground, this will absorb the shock and save your gear.
 

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I'm a shorty and have had my 2015 650 lowered all the way. And the lowered seat.
I now have the issue of the bike is too upright. so much so I now need to get a replacement bracket for the right mirror/break leaver/break fluid reservoir. (day 2 of riding it)
anyhow.
I have read over some of the past post in regards to cutting and welding the stand(I will have to get a pro to attend to this) but was wondering what the actual angle of the factory lean was. It would help when I attempt to get this sorted, cos I don't want to be in the middle of a car park laughing my head off for laying the bike down.
Many thanks for helping
I agree with others…don’t be cutting anything. Don’t worry about lean angle. Just get on the bike, ride a lot, …practice…practice…practice.
 

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Lowered mine with AdventureTech's links 3/4". I cannot run the forks up the triple clamp/fork crown due to the ABS lines under the triple clamp. I use the stock side stand and get on and off the bike from EITHER side without problems. The center stand is a different story as my short legs and smooth surface make rolling it off the center stand sometimes difficult. I ride a lot of off pavement.
 

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I lowered my 2012 Wee with 3/4" lowering links. As to the kickstand, a buddy who is quite adept at these things cut about 1/4" out of the stand. It came out perfect.

There's also the matter of a center stand, if you happen to have one. Lowering a center stand is a beast of a job, even for a skilled welder. The easiest way to handle that is to buy an adjustable center stand from TRex engineering in Dallas. Costs about $225 if I recall, and works great.
 
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I lowered my 2012 Wee with 3/4" lowering links. As to the kickstand, a buddy who is quite adept at these things cut about 1/4" out of the stand. It came out perfect.

There's also the matter of a center stand, if you happen to have one. Lowering a center stand is a beast of a job, even for a skilled welder. The easiest way to handle that is to buy an adjustable center stand from TRex engineering in Dallas. Costs about $225 if I recall, and works great.
Wish I had known about the adjustable stand before installing the Studebaker OEM imitation. I haven't had any reason to modify the side stand with the 3/4" lowering
I lowered my 2012 Wee with 3/4" lowering links. As to the kickstand, a buddy who is quite adept at these things cut about 1/4" out of the stand. It came out perfect.

There's also the matter of a center stand, if you happen to have one. Lowering a center stand is a beast of a job, even for a skilled welder. The easiest way to handle that is to buy an adjustable center stand from TRex engineering in Dallas. Costs about $225 if I recall, and works great.
 
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