StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all! I just picked up a 2019 Suzuki V-Strom 650 Touring January 5th. Already have 3k miles on it, the reason I got it was for a long 100 mile (one way) commute to a new job that I finally managed to get. My lease is up in 2 months, and I will be moving closer, but I expect to put 10k or more miles on it before that. What preventive maintenance can I take besides the usual oil, filter, fluids. Is there anything I should know? I cruise about 75(actual speed, speedo shows 81-82ish) and the RPM stays around 6k, sometimes 6.5 if I'm passing. I love the V-Strom, always was a fan of Suzuki had gsxr and sv650s in past but never a Strom. Once I move closer to my job I plan on putting some dual sport tires on it and taking it camping. About to put a givi backbox on it and get rid of the stock panniers which I don't like very much, as well as some bright spotlights on the front since my commute is through a swamp, and these big storks like sleeping in the road.

One of the things I personally love most about it is how bright the stock headlight was, that was one of first things I was going to change but after seeing how bright it is I'm going to leave it.

Thanks, and any quirks or anything I should know would be greatly appreciated! I've noticed my fuel consumption spikes considerably when it's colder for some reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,764 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,240 Posts
Mine has a one tooth larger front sprocket and dropped the RPM about 500 so higher speed seem more relaxed. But until you move, too much time will be spent on your commute so just gas and go. Mind the freaking animals on that commute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
So that's eight hours work and about four hours riding a day? I'd be done by then. Heck, given the gas prices over here it's almost worth staying in a hotel every now and then instead of commuting.

As far as lubing the chain is concerned, general recommendation is to lube it at every fill-up, or every 2nd fill-up. Which means every day or every other day in your case. I'd install an automated chain oiler as my very first upgrade. (Personally I've got the ScottOiler V-system and am happy with it.)

I'm assuming you're on the Northern Hemisphere. This means for the next months you'll be riding loads during the hours of dusk/darkness as well. Get as many lights and reflectors as you can get away with, and maybe some reflective gear.

Heated gloves, heated jacket? Maybe some spare gloves, socks, boots in the top box for after a downpour? I also keep a small bottle of water and a pack of baby wipes there to clean my visor.

Make sure you have the default Suzuki tool kit under the seat, maybe add a tire patch kit and compressor? Some zip ties and a roll of duct tape is never a bad idea either, and a roadside assistance service membership for anything you can't fix.

In-helmet audio for music, radio, cellphone? Scala, Sena are all good brands.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,103 Posts
@silveroranges:

You really don't need to do anything special for that little bit of riding. (See my signature for the mileage I have put on my Stroms.)

Change the oil & filter as recommended. Check tire pressure once in a while (realize tire pressure naturally goes up and down with temperature so don't try to be too precise with it.) I lube my chain with every tank of gas and after every ride in the rain. This literally takes less than 20 seconds on the centerstand. There is no reason to waste time or effort in "Cleaning " the chain as it does nothing helpful and may harm the chain if you use brushes on it. I have documented and cautiously worked up to this over the year and my chains now are replaced over 50,000 miles / 80,000km. (Front sprocket usually in the 25,000 to 40,000 mile range / 40,000 to 60,000 km range.) I use Wurth HHS 2000.



Yes speed (higher is worse) and temperature (colder is worse) hurt mileage. Little else makes any measurable difference. Below is a graph showing mileage over 131,000+miles, 131,000+ km on my 2015 DL1000. I can show similar graphs for my 2006 and 2012 DL650's. Yellow line is a rolling average over the last three tanks. The high mileages match higher temperatures and the lower when cold. The closer together up and downs match higher highway speeds and spikes with low mileage match trips where a lot of slabbing down interstates happened.

..Tom

268942
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
The biggest thing you will have to do to travel 10,000 miles on you DL650 is stop to get fuel at least 37 times if you average 45 mpg. Other than that oil the chain and start thinking about what new rear tire you want next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thank you all for the responses! Didn't expect to get this much good feedback. I have only lubed my chain once, so I am doing it as soon as I get home. Investing in auto oiler as well.

I get gas once a day, fill it up to brim. I am going to get that bigger sprocket, any suggestions as far as brands?

Warm clothing, I am good to go on that. In South Florida it dropped to about 35f when I started heading out 3 in the morning the other day, and I froze my ass off. I was used to it getting down to 48 at the lowest. Luckily I stopped at a store that sold hand warmers and just put them all over me as a stop gap measure, ordered electric gloves and some overpants the same day. I have a Kathmandu jacket, because I'm expecting some heavy rain here in the next month or so when it hits wet season. It's pretty warm with liner in it, and has a reflective strip on it as well.

I had most of the stuff in my panniers listed, adding baby wipes and socks though.

And yeah I have been exhausted since I started this job, definitely is going to pay off in long run though, if things keep going the way they are now this is going to be my last job. Took 2 years of interviews just to get hired. My main concern is animals, a coworker told me he crashed his motorcycle after running over a alligator, but I'm more concerned with deer. I swiped a stork already, luckily both of us were ok he just bounced off my thigh, I managed to get over enough in time.

My fiance loves the motorcycle as well, I took her down to Florida keys on it. I'm looking to eventually get a better seat, I have a wild ass cushion, it helps but my ass is still sore after the day. At least not numb anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Welcome and congratulations!!!

I own the 2019 bike you do. Suggest you follow the sound advice already given.

Consider installing the OEM heated grips. LOVE mine. Had the dealer do it - plug and play install. Then add a First Gear heated jacket under your Kathmandu. The battery operated controller / thermostat rides in my tank bag. Plug in my jacket - set the thermostst - turn on the grips and GO! Cozy.

I went to a 16 front. Others have as well. It lowers the rpm's and - IMHO - transforms the ridiing experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
Since you ride in the dark, my suggestion is to investigate how to put Hi Vis Reflective 'tape' on your riding gear. Make very sure that you can be readily seen by the cagers out there :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,764 Posts
Seat: Before you spend a lot get a Sit&Fly cover (only on ebay I think). Reduces pressure points and when its raining you are not sitting in puddle of water with the unavoidable consequences of doing so. They are cheap and worth every penny. At the last NEVA about half of the bikes had that cover …

And if you can afford it get a used Roadcrafter (e-bay). You will not be too concerned when its raining with that suit. Its my only riding gear! Try to get one with the newer generation waterproof zippers. I have ridden in hours of rain with heated gear in the cold (30th) and was comfortable and dry! Finally for rain get the Aerostich 3 digit rain gloves. Pricy but they work! NO I am not getting a commission from Aerostich. I have mostly used gear made by them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Welcome!
I'll never be an extreme mileage member, but there are plenty of Stroms that go for mileage into the hundreds of thousands. Given that so much of your riding is highway speed, are you OK with the windshield? Lots of debate here on that score, and the 2017+ buffeting thread makes for exciting reading. I'm very annoyed by wind noise and I prefer the Givi Airflow to the Madstad; I have both.

RE changing gearing, I also like a certain calmness from the engine on the highway. Changing the front sprocket to reduce highway RPM's would be welcome, but if you are planning to go beyond the pavement, it may not work to your advantage. I'd say the Strom is geared too high for some of that riding. I am nowhere near an expert or a good source of off road advice, but others I've ridden with say that most bikes are like this. Just a though to ponder on the long rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The windshield did seem a little lack luster, I don't really have anything to compare it too since most of my experience is off road or windshieldless bikes, but it did seem strange I would get random buffets. Also I'm 5'11 and the top of my helmet isn't covered by it, the bug splats start around mid face hole area haha. I actually took the top visor off my helmet because it catches the wind and wants to pull my head backwards, plus I never really do anything I would need it for.

About the sprocket, definitely going to change it to a bigger one. I'm future once I move closer to work I'll put the smaller one back on.

Thanks for gear recommendations, I just have some cheap gloves at the moment, supposed to be water proof but they haven't been tested wholly yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Don't worry if your gloves are not rubber are like most waterproof gear they'll hold the water in just fine. Most lower end water proof gear is good right up unit it starts raining. Frogg Toggs are the exception
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
.....About the sprocket, definitely going to change it to a bigger one. I'm future once I move closer to work I'll put the smaller one back on.....
Just be aware that when you change the countershaft sprocket your indicated speed (speedometer) will most likely not match your true speed. Use a GPS device to determine your actual speed. Note: This happened on my 2012 V1000 however I'm not sure the effects on your '19 V650.
268969
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,764 Posts
That's not a worry on the 2017 and newer 650 models. They calculate speed form the ABS sensor readings, not from the counter sprocket. Also the earlier WEE models read speed from the front wheel, so this is a VEE and 2nd gen 650 specific issue.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,103 Posts
That's not a worry on the newer models. They calculate speed form the ABS sensor readings, not from the counter sprocket. Also the earlier WEE models read speed from the front wheel, so this is a VEE specific issue.
I'm pretty sure the 2012 to 201? DL650 (Glee in some people's minds) did very much take the speedo from the front sprocket area.

..Tom
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top