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What's the general opinion on these? 60 mo. total = $460 I got this bike to travel with around the country and will probably put on a lot of miles. Might not be a bad idea.:confused:
 

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Read all of the warranty document as to what is covered Usually if the component is not mentioned it's not covered. The items that will cost money such as the chain, sprockets, brakes and valve adjustments will not be covered, also if one of those uncovered items let you down on the road the towing will not be covered. The bike is very reliable I would save the money for routine maintenance
 

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Having purchased 5 new Suzuki's the last 8 or so years, averaging about 1,000 miles a month on them, I've never had a need for a warranty on any of them. I keep bikes till they have about 50,000 miles, then trade, more about wanting something different than having worn them out. The only component failure I've experienced has been the water pump seal on the 2007 DL1000. Even taking that to the dealership, amounted to a couple hundred dollars, but also included new coolant, oil and filter along with new parts for the seal, impeller, bearings, and gasket. I'd spend the $$ on luggage or other accessories, or put it away for the unlikely need for a repair later.
 

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From what I've heard, usually, there are no needs for claims on extended warranties on Stroms.
In my case, when the ignition lock cylinder froze, my local dealer and the Suzuki area rep both agreed my Suzuki extended warranty did not cover repairing the bike to the original spec, where all locks were keyed alike. Since then I've had to carry and distinguish 2 different but similar looking keys since I have not done the repair myself or paid. Not a big deal, but...It is so easy to rekey the lock, that I feel the main issue here is that Suzuki wanted to make it clear they are more interested in saving pennies than in customer satisfaction.
 

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The new bike has a 12 month unlimited mileage factory warranty. Does the 60 month plan actually only give you the remaining 48 months?

Understand that there is no real extended warranty available. What is sold is a Suzuki Extended Protection program that is a pre-paid repair contract. It is sold by an outfit called CornerStone United by Suzuki dealerships and branded for Suzuki. It covers what the contract says it covers (not what the real warranty covered) and what CornerStone says they'll pay for.

I think there is universal agreement that these highly reliable bikes almost never benefit from the extended protection plan. If you do decide to buy this peace-of-mind-insurance, check the prices on the internet for the SEP program from Suzuki dealers anywhere in the country--that price you posted looks pretty good and it matches Oneida Suzuki's price.
 

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It's pretty simple: The people that sell the warranty have got it figured out that they will win, which means they make money off of you, which is of course the only reason they sell them. I was in Harbor Freight a few years ago & the guy in front of me was being asked to spend an illogical amount to warranty a Chinese junk drill motor which IMO, he would have been better off with guaranteeing himself quality & service via a good tool in the 1st place. I've never owned a new bike but doubt there's an aftermarket warranty that has true value based on the odds.
 
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Having worked a bit in a warranty admin position for a dealer, I reiterate that you MUST read ALL of the contract and understand it. You need to know what to expect before you sign.
The biggest warranty problems we had were the ones created by the sales people.
Sales people normally don't understand the warranties and gloss over the documents when they talk to the customer.
The customer would always start off with "Your salesman said...."
"If a salesman's lips are moving"...... You know the rest of that saying....
 

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I have a somewhat different take on Extended Warranty, MBI (Mechanical Breakdown Insurance) and/or ESC (Extended Service Contracts). Remember, different States have different laws. In some states a so-called called Extended Warranty or Extended Service Contract is nothing other than a prepaid Service Contract. Some of those contracts are backed by insurance, but some are not. If it is backed by insurance the ESC will say so in the documentation.

In other states you are actually receiving a MBI policy. That is an actual insurance policy you receive spelling out the coverage .

The things to remember are:

1. In the vast majority of states these items are sold on what is effectively a Cost Plus Basis. That is the dealer pays the ESC provider a certain fee for the coverage (aka dealer retention). The dealer than sees how much he can mark it up and still be sale-able. In those States you can simply ask the dealer what is your retetention / purchase price? And then try to settle on an agreeable mark-up. In true insurance states where you (i.e. the buyer) receive a policy of insurance... a Mechanical Breakdown Insurance Policy ... the dealers are not usually so flexible. And in some states "rebating" a portion of their commission is actually illegal. You might want to check with the State Insurance Department to see if rebating is legal. E.G. in N.Y. or Pennsylvania, rebating is very heavily frowned on. In other states ... Go for it.

2. Whether you are in a Service State or an Insurance State, the contract is only as good as the Company backing it and the dealership you are using. Poorly run/unethical companies mean poor coverage and poor service. Also and very important, remember the dealer is almost always paid a much lower hourly rate on Warranty Claims than Non-Warranty Claims. So it is often in their best interest to try and tell you it is not covered as they often get almost 2x the hourly rate on non-warranty claims.

3. If you are mechanically impaired (like I mostly am), and uncomfortable with the reliability reputation of your purchase or costs of repairs (e.g. Jaguar and/or Mini-Cooper cars) then you might want to try and talk the dealership into a lower fee for the coverage and buy it. If you are like me comfortable overall with the quality of your purchase (e.g. my Suzuki DL650 or Suburu car) then save the money and take the risk.

My real caveats are before making a decision:

1. Check out reliability and average repair cost (parts and service) for your vehicle.
2. Check with you Insurance Department for complaints and BEST Rating for the Insurance Company backing the ESC or providing the MBI Policy. If the policy is backed by an insurer (e.g.) domiciled in Mexico or the Vanuatu Islands I would avoid it. You stand a good chance of not being paid and the Insurance Department simply isn't going to spend a lot of time helping you to get some insurer in Medellin or Mexico to pay.
3. Check out your dealer's rep.

All the above is common sense, but it is rarely followed-up on; which is why I spelled them out. An example of negotiating the price is the Mini Cooper currently made by BMW. In Boutique cars like the Mini Cooper parts are ungodly expensive ... because there are very, very few aftermarket parts available. So I made my godson buy the ESC on his MIni-Cooper. But, I told the dealer we only would pay him a $150 guaranteed mark-up on the ESC or we would go elsewhere. He agreed. Saved over a $1,000 on the asking price of the service contract.

I apologize if I have been too wordy or pedantic. But I much rather go into a situation knowing my options so that I can make the best possible decision for my family or myself. I suspect most people are the same.
 

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All the above is common sense, but it is rarely followed-up on; which is why I spelled them out. An example of negotiating the price is the Mini Cooper currently made by BMW. In Boutique cars like the Mini Cooper parts are ungodly expensive ... because there are very, very few aftermarket parts available. So I made my godson buy the ESC on his MIni-Cooper. But, I told the dealer we only would pay him a $150 guaranteed mark-up on the ESC or we would go elsewhere. He agreed. Saved over a $1,000 on the asking price of the service contract.
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fwiw, I consider BMW one of the most economical cars to own because parts are so available.
BMW relies on outsourcing much of its manufacturing, oem parts are readily available at aftermarket prices

ya just gotta know where to look

extended warranty in a mini-cooper, they saw you coming



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