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Hi folks:

I was reading through http://www.stromtrooper.com/dl-1000-specific/67039-dangerous-chain-3.html and noticed that in one of the posts someone mentioned they wear out 2-3 front sprockets over the life of one chain. I was under the impression that you usually replace the chain/front/rear sprockets all at once.

I'm wondering:
1) How many miles can I expect out of a new OEM front sprocket?
2) Same for rear?
3) Is there a disadvantage to putting on new sprockets without changing the chain?
4) How often do you check your front sprocket for wear?
 

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There is probably a poll someplace but I can not find it. I am changing my chain and sprockets this winter at 24K miles. As I recall, many people feel the need to change in the 25K or so mile range. Also, I think most change both the sprockets and chain at the same time.
 

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The chain wear poll is at http://www.stromtrooper.com/general-v-strom-discussion/40576-when-did-you-replace-your-chain.html
Reports of sprocket wear before chain are unusual. At that point, front sprockets are usually showing little wear and rear sprockets may be showing almost none. Obviously, when one person reports using two sprockets per chain and others report two chains per sprocket, predictions are difficult.
I think when you do the normal stuff like everyone else and only get around 20,000 or so miles that sprockets will have lot's of life in them.

On my last chain, with over 46,000 miles on it, the front sprocket was well beyond it's useful life and should have been changed earlier. I'm only at about 31,000 miles currently and will be checking the front this weekend.

..Tom
 

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I would say its not the norm, but its certainly not unusual
Unusual in that significantly less than half those reporting have front sprockets wearing faster than chains. I think those using automatic chain oilers or lubing the chain at every gas stop are more likely to have longer lasting chains that may outlast sprockets.
 

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Unusual in that significantly less than half those reporting have front sprockets wearing faster than chains. I think those using automatic chain oilers or lubing the chain at every gas stop are more likely to have longer lasting chains that may outlast sprockets.
like I said, its not unusual, its just not the norm (fwiw, by scientific defintion, anything over 3% is "common")

but I disagree on what makes sprockets wear first, I think it has more to do with riding style and heavy reliance on engine braking



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like I said, its not unusual, its just not the norm (fwiw, by scientific defintion, anything over 3% is "common")

but I disagree on what makes sprockets wear first, I think it has more to do with riding style and heavy reliance on engine braking
Stress on each tooth of the sprockets is the same whether accelerating or decelerating (ie: whatever the front sprocket feels gets passed to the rear sprocket and vice versa. The chain equalizes by passing the forces back and forth.)

Logic would suggest that the front sprocket has the most wear.

There 116 links on the chain, 47 on the rear sprocket and 15 on the front (talking stock).

So each front tooth gets used 3.13 times as much as each rear tooth and if everything else was equal would wear three times faster.

BTW, Each tooth on the front sprocket gets used 7.73 times as much as each link on the chain, every tooth on the rear gets used 2.47 times as much as each link on the chain. If the chain didn't wear out internally you would expect the front sprocket to be the first thing to go.

..Tom
 

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Stress on each tooth of the sprockets is the same whether accelerating or decelerating
maximum force of acceleration is limited to your engines output while maximum force under deceleration is dependent on how fast yer going, the force of momentum can easily exceed the force of acceleration

why is it that on dirtbikes sprockets tend to wear by making the sprockets hook under acceleration, and that a bike 4 stroke adventure bike they more often hook under deceleration



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My 1/2 baked theory

Modern "O" ring chains are good until the O rings (etc) go bad
Chain will quickly turn to crap within 1000 miles after that

so

It is very dependent on chain maintenance and lube. Is there constant grit chewing on the o rings or next to none.

Look for kinks or changes in tension as the chain goes around. If there are tight and loose spots then she's on her way.

The old days chains stretched then the sprockets would get worn in a pattern that reflected the "new" spacing of the chain and thusly would not mate with a new one and help to prematurely stretch the new one. After initial chain adjustment it almost never happens anymore so I think that chain stretch is a thing of the past. If I felt poor I might do just chain and front sprocket. ALSO CUSH HUB BEARING on Vees at least

I have a heavy hand and will start inspections at about 15K
 

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maximum force of acceleration is limited to your engines output while maximum force under deceleration is dependent on how fast yer going, the force of momentum can easily exceed the force of acceleration

why is it that on dirtbikes sprockets tend to wear by making the sprockets hook under acceleration, and that a bike 4 stroke adventure bike they more often hook under deceleration
Unless a bike had an infinately long wheelbase, the weight shift lessens the possible deceleration provided by the rear compared to what could be available under acceleration; but it really is academic from the point of view of which sprocket wears.

The forces going through each tooth of the sprockets are the same on front and rear sprockets. This is true accelerating using engine power or decelerating using engine braking. They might hook more on deceleration or acceleration but the bottom line is that the sprocket with less teeth sees each tooth get more wear than the other.

..Tom
 

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but it really is academic from the point of view of which sprocket wears.
Doh! which sprocket ?

I'm not thinking at all of which sprocket but which way the worn teeth hook

are we talking the same thing ?

under acceleration, the chain will pull the tooth back under the stress of forward rotation of the front sprocket

under decelleration, the chain overrunning the sprocket will push the tooth forward with the momentum and gravity of the bike

my front sprockets, I get wear from deceleration



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Doh! which sprocket ?

I'm not thinking at all of which sprocket but which way the worn teeth hook

are we talking the same thing ?

under acceleration, the chain will pull the tooth back under the stress of forward rotation of the front sprocket

under decelleration, the chain overrunning the sprocket will push the tooth forward with the momentum and gravity of the bike

my front sprockets, I get wear from deceleration
Okay, I thought we were addressing:

randyo said:
...but I disagree on what makes sprockets wear first, I think it has more to do with riding style and heavy reliance on engine braking
And I may have misunderstood your point.

But having said that, I suspect the type of wear may be largely determined by the type of riding, but the amount of wear is largely depending on how often you lube it.

..Tom
 
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