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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

If you have never accidentally over-torqued a bolt and stripped the aluminum engine block threads out of a hole, it'll almost make you puke when you feel the sickening give-way of a wrench when it breaks threads loose. Here are the threads that I unscrewed from the bolt when it came out:



Even worse, it was my new baby, 2014 new old stock DL1000, only 126 miles on it.

My bolt (M6 x 1) was stripped while I was tightening a bolt that uses an engine bolt on the left side lower cover, rear. It was for my SW Motech skid plate, which I like the looks of very much.

I did it, and as embarrassing and awful as it is, it can be fixed. I bought the Heli Coil set on Amazon for under $30 delivered and it's a few simple but **very** nerve-wracking steps....

1. Drill out the stripped hole to the appropriate depth. I measured it and put blue painters tape on my drill bit so I wouldn't over penetrate and stopped at the right depth.

fear scale of 1 to 10: about a 4

2. Tap the hole with the 1/4" tap tool. Only took about 5 minutes. Lubed the hole first. Went a turn and a half, backed it up a bit, turned some more. Sprayed out the bit with air a few times during this process.

Fear scale 1 to 10: 9.5

The thought of damaging these threads was echoing in my head. I was a first timer and always took wood shop over metal shop in high school. Wish I hadn't now.. :)

3. Thread the helicoil into the new threads.

Fear scale 1 to 10: 2

No problem. It turned in with a little bit of friction, not much, because the thread coil is sprung a little bit and needs a tiny bit of compression.

4. Tap out the cross-bit at the end of the heli coil with the tool. It breaks off easily with a tap. Sprayed air in to be sure it was out.

New threads ready. Problem solved!!!
I'm ecstatic I got this done. It took me 2 nights of re-watching YouTube videos to get my brain ready.

It's all better now:



The left side cover is back on and the bolts are all on, only hand tightened. I'm waiting for my new torque wrench to show up. It's a 7-35 ft lb model with a digital converter on it for Newton Meters.

I think the torque spec is 9.6 N-m for these engine bolts.

Never again will I torque without the proper torque wrench....

Learn from my mistakes, any of you that are not seasoned wrenches and do not have the "feel" or the proper torquing measurement...

Best and Happy Holidays...
 

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That sucks, but glad you got it squared away!

Tipsy
 

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Good post, and I hope it helps someone out.

and Kudo's to you on fixing it correctly.
 

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Nice work! It happens to everyone, especially when you're working with aluminum. Glad you were able to successfully overcome that! Gotta have a torque wrench on bikes these days.
 

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yikes, it's such a sickening feeling when you doing do something to a brand new bike. When I had about 20 miles on mine I was installing heated grips and managed to glue the throttle tube to the bars. Not as bad as yours, but I had it take everything off and use some sandpaper to clean the glue off!
 

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You need to have a bottle of Jack Daniels sitting near you. This is needed as a reward or compensation depending on success or not.:wink2:
 

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yikes, it's such a sickening feeling when you doing do something to a brand new bike. When I had about 20 miles on mine I was installing heated grips and managed to glue the throttle tube to the bars. Not as bad as yours, but I had it take everything off and use some sandpaper to clean the glue off!

I bet if we made a thread about stupid things that's happened to our new bikes we'd all have a bunch of stories. I dropped my 650 when taking it out one early morning but luckily my house caught it before it fully went down. Scratched up the plastic a little. On my 2014 GSXR 1000 I took the fairings off to do some work and knocked one over or kicked it (can't remember) and scratched those fairings probably within a month of owning it.
 

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Probably everyone has had that "sickening give-way" of the wrench at one point or another. the luckier ones did it to something unimportant or easily replaceable. The rest of us, like you, learned to install heli-coils.
 

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Scarey, hang yourself in the garage business there!
Nice fix and glad you did not reach for the rope...:surprise:
 

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Old air-cooled VW spark plugs.

1/2" reach+alloy head+years of abuse in workshops = about 1 ft/lb between "so loose it'll vibrate out" and "oops, stripped it again".

Don't ask me how I know.

Come to think of it, maybe that's why Japanese bikes use soft cross-head screws rather than hex head, more likely to wreck the head than strip the thread??
 

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Stripped threads

I had a spark plug snap off the the right head of my 82' Silverwing GL500I. Snapped off right above the threads as I was trying to take the plug out. I had to pull the head off and take to a machine shop to install a Stainless Steal double threaded insert like this.

+ TIME-SERT® SPARK PLUG THREAD REPAIR KITS + spark plug stripped thread repair kits for spark plug problems, thread stripped spark plug repairs in damaged threads in spark plug hole stripped out approved thread repair, aluminum head spark plug repair

The plug had really galled in the head.

That was 25 years ago. Ever since I ALWAYS put antisieze on spark plug threads when in stalling to prevent galling. In fact I use it on most bolts going in aluminum.
 

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Most spark plugs now have coated threads to prevent galling. In fact, NGK published a paper saying anti seize should not be used on its spark plugs because it throws off the torque value. Lubricating the thread lowers friction and makes the torque excessive when the wrench is set to the specified value. Uncoated plug threads need anti seize as do the threads on rear axles to prevent galling. If the spec is for anti seize, use it and the recommended torque. If not specified and you do use it, lower the torque. 80% of the dry spec is usually a good value if using anti seize when it isn't specified. 58lb-ft or 80Nm is a good value on the rear axle when adding anti seize for example as that is 80% of the dry spec.

http://www.ngkplugpro.ca/content/contentfiles/pdf/NGKSP-0907-1R-Anti-SeizeonSparkPlugs.pdf
 

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Most spark plugs now have coated threads to prevent galling. In fact, NGK published a paper saying anti seize should not be used on its spark plugs because it throws off the torque value. Lubricating the thread lowers friction and makes the torque excessive when the wrench is set to the specified value. Uncoated plug threads need anti seize as do the threads on rear axles to prevent galling. If the spec is for anti seize, use it and the recommended torque. If not specified and you do use it, lower the torque. 80% of the dry spec is usually a good value if using anti seize when it isn't specified. 58lb-ft or 80Nm is a good value on the rear axle when adding anti seize for example as that is 80% of the dry spec.

http://www.ngkplugpro.ca/content/contentfiles/pdf/NGKSP-0907-1R-Anti-SeizeonSparkPlugs.pdf
I agree. I've seen the NGK link before. Truth is the WeeStrom is so maintenance free, I haven't actually had to put plugs in my Weestoms my self. When my 06" finally needed the valves adjusted at 62,000 miles, I had my dealer put plugs in it then even though they were still perfectly fine. The valves and plugs had been checked at 23,000 miles and again at 42,00 miles. My 11" only has 23,000+ miles so it will be a long time before it needs plugs.

If I can't get a torque wrench on spark plugs (like my car) I have always just wrapped my hand around the socket/ratchet head and "lightly snugged them up". It doesn't take a lot of torque for spark plugs and I've never had one leak or unscrew it self. My 69" Dodge Charger 440 Rt/SE and my 71" Charger 500 RT/SE, 383 magnums needed plugs about every 4000 miles. Dealers were charging $75.00 to install a set plugs back then. So I got a lot of practice on them and still have the Industro swivel head ratched wrench I bought to do them. $35 was a lot of money for a ratchet wrench back then but it is still going strong.

If my memory serves me correctly, I think it was JohnofChar who first published the rear axel nut torque value on Vsri a few years ago. I've been using the 58 ft/lb value ever since.


Correction: My memory didn't serve me well. It was you Greywolf. Here's your post on Vsri on 5/26/09

" http://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,10407.msg114148.html#msg114148 Re: #$%#&# Rear axle and nut
« REPLY #1 on: 05/26/09 0512 Hours »
REPLY | QUOTE
The nut and axle are galling. Stainless steel is prone to cold welding under pressure. It's less likely to happen with the larger nut as a larger surface means less pressure. My recommendation is to use anti seize to prevent galling and cut down the torque to 58lb-ft to make up for the lubrication effect of the anti seize. You may be able to break the nut with a nut cracker and save the axle but it may have been too buggered unless you find a really large die."
 

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I bet if we made a thread about stupid things that's happened to our new bikes we'd all have a bunch of stories. I dropped my 650 when taking it out one early morning but luckily my house caught it before it fully went down. Scratched up the plastic a little. On my 2014 GSXR 1000 I took the fairings off to do some work and knocked one over or kicked it (can't remember) and scratched those fairings probably within a month of owning it.
I brought my new bike home on the back of a pickup and stupidly put a tarp over it, when I got it home the windshield and some of the plastic parts were scratched up. I replaced the windshield and the rest I try to forget about. Almost dumped the bike at the first stop light too, but managed to save it.
 

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That's something I probably would have done too. Half the time were so excited about our new purchase that we don't think things through. I'd like to hear some other stories cuz I know there is plenty.
 

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I put on the sw motech skid plate and when out in the boonies all I could think about was it hitting something and breaking the case (the sw motech I had on my 09 1000 did not attach to the engine) I took the 6 bolts out and have not had any vibrations or problems in several 1000's of miles. Why would you bolt to the thing you are trying to protect?
 

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I put on the sw motech skid plate and when out in the boonies all I could think about was it hitting something and breaking the case. Why would you bolt to the thing you are trying to protect?
Good point, I had a front wheel drive Morris 1500 years ago that had the gearbox in the cast alloy sump, it had a steel guard that bolted to the sump. I hit a rock and cracked the sump where it bolted on, had to buy new sump/gearbox.:frown2:
 
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