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Discussion Starter #1
A buddy who owns a DL1K-K5 with about miles has suffered a breakdown.
For several months he's complained that the bike will have occational minor backfires particularly in second gear when easing along at partial throttle openings.
He rode about 350 interstate miles. The next morning the bike started but after pulling out onto a road there was a very loud BANG and it quit. It restarted and would idle but any application of throttle resulted in coughing and sputtering. Engaging the clutch resulted in the engine dying. He's taken it to a local, highly reputable shop but they won't really get into it until Monday.

SO???? Is this timing? Fuel injectors? Gremlins?

A google thanks
 

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The pop/bang disloged the throttle bodies from the intake boots. Pull the tank, lossen up the clamps that hold the TB's in the intake and push back in. Retighten said clamps and he should be back in business.

The popping is being caused by a lean condition at low rpm's.
 

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Depending on the mileage on the bike (missing from post) the fuel pump filter may be pretty well clogged up causing it to lean out further.

I would check the pump delivery rate. It should be ~1,000-1200ml in 30 seconds or so. Under 700ml starts to cause poor running.

It's easy to check.
 

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The pop/bang disloged the throttle bodies from the intake boots. Pull the tank, lossen up the clamps that hold the TB's in the intake and push back in. Retighten said clamps and he should be back in business.

The popping is being caused by a lean condition at low rpm's.

^^^^ Yes, this.

Get that bike away from the dealer monkeys pronto before they hurt it.
 

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so, perhaps not the super correct place to ask this, but since boot displacement seems to be a fairly common issue, and suzuki (mikuni?) was smart enough not to design the boots to stay on a bit better, has no one come up with a solution to keeping these buggers in place? hose clamps, adhesive of some sort?
 

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so, perhaps not the super correct place to ask this, but since boot displacement seems to be a fairly common issue, and suzuki (mikuni?) was smart enough not to design the boots to stay on a bit better, has no one come up with a solution to keeping these buggers in place? hose clamps, adhesive of some sort?
Happens to a lot of bikes, it's not a Suzuki problem. A properly tuned bike won't pop them off.
 

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so, perhaps not the super correct place to ask this, but since boot displacement seems to be a fairly common issue, and suzuki (mikuni?) was smart enough not to design the boots to stay on a bit better, has no one come up with a solution to keeping these buggers in place? hose clamps, adhesive of some sort?
To cure this issue for good, you'd have to correct the lean mapping below 4,000 rpm. Stronger clamps aren't the cure.
 

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Consider it a "fuse". That pressure has to go somewhere. While it is indeed a backfire from fueling issues mostly that causes it you can make them more secure. Clean both surfaces very well with alcohol and I like to use 3M adhesion promoter on them . Tighten securely and they stay on thru most backfires.
 

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"The pop/bang disloged the throttle bodies from the intake boots. Pull the tank, lossen up the clamps that hold the TB's in the intake and push back in. Retighten said clamps and he should be back in business."

Happened to me last May
 

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Happens to a lot of bikes, it's not a Suzuki problem. A properly tuned bike won't pop them off.
seems to me that "properly tuned" means re-mapping suzuki's bad map, making it a suzuki problem.

yes i relize they mapped it a particular way to comply with epa regs, so by super-extension, it is an epa problem.

anyway, its good to hear that once the bike is mapped properly they don't flop around.

thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
10 points to EC90T

My buddy reported:
The shop confirmed the throttle bodies had dislodged from their intended roosts. Repair was $70 which, considering my buddy has never had the tank off, isn't bad.

10 "engine guru" points to EC90T.

By the by: the shop that did the repair is independent service vendor that sells used bikes mostly on consignment and some accessories/gear. My point is that service is most of their business. The mechanic stated that the lean running results from a loose throttle body, not imperfect mapping.

Don't shoot the messenger, I'm just sharing.
 

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As a K9 owner I can confirm that it's lean enough that even with all adjustments in spec that the bike still misfires around 2.8K and 3.6K RPM. I ended up wiring my rear TB down to the valve cover after having it dislodge several times with no problems now. I don't usually run the RPM's down that low except in traffic and practicing police cone courses however it mostly happens when the temps are in the 3-4 bar range. Since the '09 and above are deligated to using the PC5 instead of the PC3 I'm not sure if the non adjustable RPM gray area of the PC5 includes the 2-4K RPM range. May try one and see anyway even though there are other fuel management alternatives.
Our '09 650 exibits none these problems.
 

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The pop/bang disloged the throttle bodies from the intake boots. Pull the tank, lossen up the clamps that hold the TB's in the intake and push back in. Retighten said clamps and he should be back in business.

The popping is being caused by a lean condition at low rpm's.
I think am facing this issue as well. Can someone be more specific on how to do this? A picture if possible.
 

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I think am facing this issue as well. Can someone be more specific on how to do this? A picture if possible.
I just had to do this to get to my ignition connection, and Greywolf hooked me up with this link. Scared the daylights out of me, but it was all bark and no bite (the worst part was at the end, cursing the gods about a screw I'd misplaced somewhere in the garage!)

Fuel Tank Removal How to, 650 & 1000

Once you have the tank off, you'll see the large black plastic airfilter body. At the bottom of it, you'll see the joints pictured in jayDL's link. From there, its just screws.
 

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My buddy reported:
The shop confirmed the throttle bodies had dislodged from their intended roosts. Repair was $70 which, considering my buddy has never had the tank off, isn't bad.

10 "engine guru" points to EC90T.

By the by: the shop that did the repair is independent service vendor that sells used bikes mostly on consignment and some accessories/gear. My point is that service is most of their business. The mechanic stated that the lean running results from a loose throttle body, not imperfect mapping.

Don't shoot the messenger, I'm just sharing.
I can assure you that the boot/s blew off due to the lean mixture below 4,000. This causes, under certain conditions, the motor to "backfire" (which means through the carb)..thus blowing the boots off. If he wants to keep and enjoy the bike, he should go buy a Power Commander III, and add about 8-12% more fuel in the 2,000-4,000rpm zone, for throttle openings below 1/2. Alternatively, go to the forum section with maps, do the research, and download a custom map. The difference in how the bike runs will be astonishing. It was for me (and I tried fighting it for months):furious: By the way, if he doesn't get a PCIII, the boots will blow off again, it's only a matter of time.
 

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I think am facing this issue as well. Can someone be more specific on how to do this? A picture if possible.
there's a schematic / overview somewhere on here. I'll give you the cliff notes:

* remove side panels (I don't actually completely remove the big/main panels. I just remove all the bolts from the rear section, so that it's very loose and I can get to stuff)
* remove seat
* remove bolt at tank rear
* remove bolt/nut at tank front (the long one that's horizontal)
* tilt tank up at the back and disconnect the tube and wires that are connected to it....make not which goes where
* remove tank and set aside

from there....you've got a much much better view of the top of the motor and can better access the throttle bodies. this is a good time to also remove the air clearner assembly and check out the air filter. If you're new to cycle maint, this all sounds more difficult and daunting than it really is.
 

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Mine never blew TB boots but was running crappy due to the lean factory settings at low RPM. I mean it ran terrible IMO.

You have options
1) Live with it and learn to ride around the RPM range at issue. Free
2) Buy a PC or other fuel management add on for your bike. Cost around $275 plus tuning time.
3) Have a shop who has a dyno and knowledgeable staff reflash the stock ECU. Cost around $150.

If you have future mods in mind or are a tuning fanatic...go route 2). If you just want your stock Vee to run correctly and gain a little power in the process go 3), but any future changes in intake or exhaust will require another reflash.

I would not ride a stock Vee. If I bought a 2012 and it stumbled on take off...I would reflash it the next day. It is just not worth riding it farked up like they come new.
 
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