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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there! My '11 650 has 40k miles and had run great since I bought it over a year ago. Yesterday, I needed to run some errands around town and I knew I only had about 50 miles of gas left in the tank, so I decided to fill up with premium at a BP near my house. I started the bike, left the gas station, and went by back roads to my first stop 10 miles away, one stop sign, then pulled in and cut the engine. I then left for my second stop a couple miles away. Two stop signs, then a red light. It died when trying to pull out from that red light. It started like normal and I continued on to my second errand through that red light and two stop signs before pulling in to the parking lot and cutting the engine. A few minutes later, I had finished my quest and was ready to head home. I restarted the bike without issue, and went through town instead of taking back roads. One stop light, another a few miles down the road, another a couple miles more, another, another, another, another, maybe one more (that's a lot of red lights to remember) before bringing it home and parking it in the driveway since I was going to ride it again that day. A few hours later, I prepared to leave the house again and started the bike. After a bit, I went to pull out of my driveway and it died as soon as I gave it a little throttle. I restarted about 5 times to try to get a bead on what was happening. It died every time after I gave a little throttle, however it will continue to run if I give a LOT of throttle (albeit rough sounding). It cranks just fine & started without a hitch every time I needed to yesterday.
So..... any more information you guys would need to give me a clue (including my first choice of bad gas) on what's going on here? A buddy of mine pointed me to your community for help, but I can try to give y'all more detailed info if I can, not being a mechanic, no garage, limited tools. You get the picture.
Thank you for your help in advance.
 

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Welcome John!

Just want to confirm that the engine quits at idle when you come to a stop sign/light?

Also can you confirm that you are not having loss of power at highway speeds especially when trying to accelerate, as in passing a vehicle or climbing a decent road grade.

Just trying to rule in or out high pressure fuel filter. It's possible that you picked up some bad gas but not the most likely cause of your problem.
 

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No. It doesn't die when I come to a stop. It dies when giving slight throttle FROM a stop. I noticed no power loss at highway speed once I was able to get to it (55 maximum right out of town). I'm sure I passed a couple people in town that are really slow to accelerate, inside town, and noticed nothing wrong. Also, there's a couple steep grades close to my house. I noticed nothing wrong there either. I think the problem got worse after the initial death in town during my running around (possibly right after I got gas 15 minutes earlier), and just didn't become debilitating until after I got home and parked it for a few hours.
 

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Sounds like my bike did when I got a tank full of water.

I filled up at the wrong place, it looked new but his fuel was crap.

I was in the middle of a two week ride so had to pay to get the fuel dumped and replace.
 
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274359


This is what I use to syphon gas from my tank along with a piece of tubing.

i just pull the plunger end straight out the back side and the gas flows through and into an unused jerry can.
Very easy, no mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm going to do that first. Dump the fuel. Buy some somewhere else. Should I be worried about any filters, or should it work itself out? ...on the chance that this fixes the problem.
 

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I’m not an expert on the subject, but I have had a bad tank of gas before In a Camaro. It was popping big time upon deceleration and running like crap. I just ran It low and then added a fresh tank of fuel. Problem solved.

I'm sure you will get all sorts of advise, but I’d personal keep it simple.
 

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I did not get to see my filter but I had it changed when the tank was emptied.

To spoil more of my holiday would have been worse than the cost of replacing the filter.
 
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I’m not an expert on the subject, but I have had a bad tank of gas before In a Camaro. It was popping big time upon deceleration and running like crap. I just ran It low and then added a fresh tank of fuel. Problem solved.

I'm sure you will get all sorts of advise, but I’d personal keep it simple.
Yep. the one change I had made that day was filling up my tank, then BAM! Problems less than 20 minutes later.
 

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I did not get to see my filter but I had it changed when the tank was emptied.

To spoil more of my holiday would have been worse than the cost of replacing the filter.
Sure. Fuel filters are relatively cheap, and if I DO have water in my lines, that should clear it up hopefully.
 

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Sure sounds like bad fuel then. Maybe try googling that particular gas station to see if anyone else is complaining about their fuel.

Looks like you're going to have to syphon the gas out of your tank then remove the tank from the bike to get the final half gallon or so out.

If you feel its water contamination you could try a little methyl hydrate in the tank to see if that helps before draining the tank.
 

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I have never used them myself but there are fuel stabilisers out there that may just help you in this case. In particular if there's water in your fuel, it may keep that water dissolved (or in suspension) in the fuel, instead of bottoming out. Your bike will not run perfectly, but at least it will run.

If you decide to dump the fuel but you don't have anything to syphon or suck your fuel out, but you do have some basic tools with you (even if it's just the Suzuki OEM toolkit), you can loosen the tupperware, lift the tank and undo the fuel hose at the tank end. Put a piece of hose - any hose - on the outlet instead, put the other end in a suitable container, and keep recycling the ignition until all the fuel has been pumped out.

In fact, if you only get about half of the fuel out and mix this with half a tank of good fuel, then it may already prevent your bike from stalling.

I don't know the rules where you live, but out here all petrol stations are by law required to have a fuel/water separation system in their storm drains, so that spilled fuel doesn't get into the sewer system. So you can safely dispose of fuel by putting it into the storm drain at a petrol station. (Do ask for permission though.)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have never used them myself but there are fuel stabilisers out there that may just help you in this case. In particular if there's water in your fuel, it may keep that water dissolved (or in suspension) in the fuel, instead of bottoming out. Your bike will not run perfectly, but at least it will run.

If you decide to dump the fuel but you don't have anything to syphon or suck your fuel out, but you do have some basic tools with you (even if it's just the Suzuki OEM toolkit), you can loosen the tupperware, lift the tank and undo the fuel hose at the tank end. Put a piece of hose - any hose - on the outlet instead, put the other end in a suitable container, and keep recycling the ignition until all the fuel has been pumped out.

In fact, if you only get about half of the fuel out and mix this with half a tank of good fuel, then it may already prevent your bike from stalling.

I don't know the rules where you live, but out here all petrol stations are by law required to have a fuel/water separation system in their storm drains, so that spilled fuel doesn't get into the sewer system. So you can safely dispose of fuel by putting it into the storm drain at a petrol station. (Do ask for permission though.)
I think I'm going to try a method similar to this one. I'll use a syringe similar to the one Bandit_Bill suggested to test for water, and if contaminated, get out most of that watered down gas out of the tank (since water settles to the bottom, and I haven't moved the bike in a couple of days). Then I'll try adding some Sea Foam to what's left in the tank, and letting it idle for awhile, giving some throttle periodically to test how it's working. Hopefully I'll be able to start doing it this evening. We'll see.

On your last statement, I'm SURE there are laws in place for water separation and removal. However, if fuel in those big underground tanks doesn't get fully rotated out (gas stations outside city limits are unpopular), then water may settle at the bottom of them. I don't know, but it sounds legit.
 

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I think I have resolved my engine-dying problem. I would like to create a hypothetical scenario that may have happened, or it might be complete fiction. Only you can make that determination, because it involves a third party which may, or may not exist.
This story is about a fly that was in the wrong place, at the wrong time....
As I was starting my errand run, I left the house and went to a nearby gas station to fill up. I pulled up to one of the pumps and cut the engine. I didn't know it, but there is a common fly flying around a nearby trash can. It is rather old for a fly, and will be dead from natural causes within the minute.
I take the key out of my ignition and insert it into the lock on the filler cap. The fly zooms over my head. I turn the key and open the filler cap. Consciousness fades from the fly and it falls from overhead.
Fate has caused the trajectory of the dead fly, falling from the sky, to end squarely into my nearly empty gas tank without a sound. I fill up my tank, not knowing there is a dead fly in there. I button her up and take off.
Everything is fine for about 15 minutes or so, until I'm at a red light. The very dead, and partially disintegrated fly has already been pulled into the fuel line. When the light turns green, I give a little throttle, but one of the wings gets lodged in one of the injector jets, and the engine dies. I immediately start it back up thinking that I just was a little too quick on the clutch. The fly was pushed aside due to fuel pressure. Oblivious, I didn't give it another thought, as I continued with errands for the next 45 minutes to an hour without issue.
When I finally got back home, I pulled the bike around facing the road, as I would be leaving again in a few hours. The bike sat parked for about 3 hours as the now unrecognizable partially dissolved dead fly settled back into its injector jet tomb. Later, when I came back out to leave, I started the bike and gave a little throttle to pull out from stop, and the engine dies. This has now happened twice. That's not a coincidence. I start it again. I give a little throttle, and it dies again. Concerned at this point, I start the motor again and give a LOT of throttle. It doesn't die, but it doesn't sound good, either. I push the bike back in to the small shed where she lives, and it sits there for the next two weeks (I've been busy and haven't really had the time to mess with it).
Today marks two weeks since I parked it. I siphoned out a little of the gas from the bottom of the tank into a glass. Letting it sit for a couple minutes, I return to a glass full of pretty gasoline. There's no water and no junk, just gasoline. I decide to pour in some Sea Foam fuel treatment and give the bike a good shaking for about 15 seconds or so. I let it sit for a couple minutes, then started it. It starts right up, no hesitation. It sounds pretty great. I give it a little throttle and IT DOESN"T DIE! I'm excited, so I get my helmet and ride her to the end of my neighborhood, come back, park it, get ready to leave for my errands, start it back up, and leave.
The bike ran great the whole time. I pretty much rode the same route I did two weeks ago. I even stopped at the same red light and I have to say, I was nervous right when it turned green, but it didn't die, so I was super stoked.
So, in my mind, a fly died and fell into my gas tank, got sucked into the fuel line, disintegrated, and the Sea Foam cleaned up the whole mess.
What do you think? Could it be fact, or do I have one of those intermittent problems that will only rear it's ugly head when I'm a hundred miles away from home on a mountain back road somewhere?
 

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Nope, not buying the fly scenario. The fly (object) would likely not get past the suction screen, at least in the short term. The wing of the fly would never get past the high pressure filter intact and then lodge in the fuel injector. The fuel treatment (Sea Foam) may have played a part in opening up your high pressure filter a bit but may not fix the problem long term. You should still do a flow test to confirm the pump is within spec and be prepared to do a filter bypass at some point.
 
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