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Discussion Starter #1
Ok Internets, I need help!



Here is the deal. 2007 650. Seems like the electrical system is over worked. When I grab the brakes, the headlight visibly dims. When I turn on flashers or turn signals, headlight dims in time to the flashers. I can also hear the fuel pump pitch change with the flashers (bike runs fine).

What I have checked/done:
Brand new Battery

Battery sits at about 13.4 volts at idle. Drops a little bit 13.1-13.2 when revved. :confused:

Regulator/rectifier passed the test in the service manual, all numbers in spec.

Stator passed tests in the manual too.

Cleaned up ground and positive connections at battery. Should probably check ground to frame connection.



This may be unrelated, but it occasionally blows the fuse for the signals (ie dash lights/guages, turn signals etc) seems to happen when I shut the bike off or turn it back on, but of course I cant recreate is so not sure.


Whats next to try??

Thanks!!
 

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Blows the fuse ... there's your culprit. Most likely a bad ground or intermittent short on that circuit. You'll need a test lamp and multimeter to troubleshoot.

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Those things are normally associated with a bad earth.

Check the main cable where it meets the motor and the big plug on the left side up near the radiator as first points after that is keep looking you will find it eventually.
 

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A bad ground wont blow a fuse, but an intermittent short certainly will.
13.4 @ idle is too low, drops when revved is not what you want.
Battery--new means just that, new, not necessarily good.
Any aftermarket lighting equipment or wiring on this bike?
 

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Actually the fuse blowing may be a key. I would carefully inspect the battery to frame grounds, and every ground I can find. The dimming of other circuits when turning on others is often a grounding issue. There can be weird circumstances where current uses another circuits ground path to complete the circuit. Follows the path of least resistance. This stray current can overload other circuits causing fuses to blow. This is pretty rare however. Unless you have some wiring issues caused by harness damage or improper connections for accessories.

But, we need to know if the "new battery" was installed AFTER these problems started?

If so, has this battery been charged fully before installing?

Because 13.2 volts revved up tells us the stator has failed.

The dimming as the lights come on can in fact be a ground, but it can also be the charging system failing to maintain an even voltage under changing loads. Which is usually going to be a stator failure.
 
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My experience with my '01 SV650 could be apples to oranges compared to gen 1 Wee so feel free to disregard this. The symptoms that I had were similar to the OP's......At idle 13.8V. When RPM goes above 2500 the voltage reading starts to drop and winds up at 13.2 and stays there. Gen 1 Sv's were noted for having bad reg/rects. I replaced it with a series type r/r, beefed up the wiring from the stator to the r/r and solved my problem. The last thing that I want to do is complicate the issue for the OP so somebody chime in.
 

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Before reading too much into the slight "battery ... drops" observation, the locations at which that voltage was measured should be considered. If one voltmeter lead was to the frame or some other part of the ground system other than the negative terminal of the battery, that drop likely indicates only a somewhat resistive set of connections. If the measurements were taken at the battery terminals, then I agree that the stator may be implicated. Given that the OP did the checks listed in the service manual, (which I recall involve AC voltage measurements with the stator disconnected), it would then be worthwhile to look for continuity between the stator windings and the engine. There should be no such continuity when the 3-wire stator connector is disconnected.

As others have noted, a poor ground system connection could be involved. After verifying that the stator is not failing, I would look for excessive voltage drops between different parts of the ground system, including across that block connector that connects the panel and carries headlight current through a single, overloaded pin pair.
 

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Any recent electrical mods been done lately?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for all the replies!!!

I will answer the group as a whole here.




The electrical system is bone stock. No extra lights etc.

So the battery may have been installed after the light flickering started, or not lol. I'm not sure when that began. I got this bike in April, and didn't ride in the dark much at all, so may not have noticed. However the fuse blowing is post new battery. Battery was bench charged before install. Don't remember if I checked voltage on it off the bench, oh well.

Voltage has been measured at the battery terminal, not the frame.

I am going to go check grounds and the stator to engine test that trepidator suggested. I shall post back with updates.


Thank you all again I appreciate it!!
 

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A poor earth will also give you a unreliable voltage reading.

A fuse will pop when the current is greater than the fuse is designed for and as voltages changes so do currents, it could be that everything is now being powered through that fuse as it is the only earth it can find.


This is where we miss GW, there was a year that the wires rubbed through on the frame on the left side between the seat and the foot peg, GW would remember what year that was.
 

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There are two wires at the negative terminal of the battery.

Trace the smaller wire from the negative battery terminal and verify that the connector that is about a foot from the battery is mated.

The large wire from the negative battery terminal goes to the engine case. Its purpose is to provide a ground for the starter motor, the coils, spark plugs, and oil pressure sender. According to the wiring diagram, everything else on the bike is grounded via that other smaller wire. Apparently, there is a leak to ground somewhere because a bike will sometimes run, but badly, with the second (the small) ground wire disconnected.
 

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If it is a grounding issue a voltage drop to neg on battery/back probing at several points in the harness should find it.The ac checks are critical the reg can,t produce power,it has to be there already.Sometimes just taking a wire from the block and grounding different loads will help locate the problem -when you by- pass the bad ground symptoms would alleviate.If the ac is off and stator rings and meggs to ground ok/don,t forget the magnet issues posted by others/ that issue might also explain lower voltages....the fuse to the turn signal might be better evaluated after voltages are correct / if problem is still present.good luck...the intermittent stuff is the hardest to find that's why I would suggest voltage sort out first
 

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PS by ringing Imeant good continuity and by megging I meant taking a megger at lower setting and ensuring no grounding of stator is present with ac applied (open) sorry, it's early /on the way to work
 

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"it could be that everything is now being powered through that fuse as it is the only earth it can find."
Sorry, no.
If grounds fail, the current from the load will look for any ground it can find, even a partial ground. But it wont blow a fuse.
Back in the '70s when I was turning wrenches at a Fiat/Lancia dealership, bad grounds were common. It wasnt unusual to find clutch, speedometer, and parking brake cables cables melted as starter current was looking for any means to find its way back to the battery.
Poor grounds can also damage transmission bearings, various other bearings. One of the reasons that on some vehicles, you'll find grounding straps on the exhaust, transmission, engine, even suspension bits.
Which is a good reason to use your voltmeter not just to measure voltage, but to look for voltage drops at junctions, connectors, switches, and grounds.
When you see a car going down the road with a very dim headlamp, it is(usually) a bad bround or ground connector from the headlamp back to the battery negative via the body. The headlamp is a fairly large amperage load, and Ive never seen a bad ground in a headlamp circuit blow a fuse.
 

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When you have a bad earth as we have all seen many globes will/can operate at the same time, so your could turn on your indicator and have all 4 glow along with the tail light and stop light overloading the flasher fuse. so sorry yes.
 

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Sorry, it's still NO. Ive seen bad flasher cause all lamps to stay on and NEVER pop a fuse. Explain how a high resistance connection, such as a loose ground wire will increase current over what the circuit was designed for. Ive seen loose grounds burn holes in body panels where the ground stud was located, seen countless plastic connector bodies that were burned by the loose terminals they surrounded, seen lights go dim, motors slow down, but NEVER have I seen a bad ground cause a fuse to pop.
 

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a meggar is a type of continuity meter electricians use to check windings on motors/generators and such,it tickles the circuit with between 150 and 1000vdc to see if it will spark to ground when ac is present...the amount of voltage used is set before testing (usually 2 to 3 x normal operating voltage}in this case prob. lowest setting/then push button-if the coil is bad the meter will pull under 1k ohms to ground and if it remains fairly high/10 k ohms or better the integrity of the insulation on the winding is good and if continuity is also good then stator is not the problem
 

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Phil, I had to laugh.
I hadnt heard the term "megger" since my automotive trade school days in '71.
The megger was used along with a hack saw blade looking for open windings in starter motors and generators. It was a bench-mount device with a Vee-shaped area in which the starter or generator armature was placed, an alternating current was induced into the windings, and a hack saw blade placed over the windings parallel to the shaft. The saw blade would buzz with a working circuit, an open or shorted winding wouldnt buzz. Simple, but effective.
Thanks for jarring my memory! lol
 

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While you are combing through the electrical issue here. You may want to invest in some headlight relays.


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