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Discussion Starter #1
Looks like they'll be transferring a bit of F1 tech to the street:


Be interesting to see if they also use the motor as a generator to control boost and regenerate energy to the battery pack, as they do in F1
 

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Electric turbo? Shoot, those have been around since I was in grade school. Haven’t you ever seen those old computer towers that the “Turbo” button on the front of them? That was all electric. Oh, wait...😄😄
 

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Electric Turbo? No it's an electric blower.
I'm not a engine addict but it seems to me that a turbo is exhaust driven and the Blower is powered by belts pumping the air. No or less spool time, more go now throttle.?

"Essentially, a turbo sits off of your exhaust manifold, and the exhaust gasses spin one end of the turbo (the exhaust side), which makes your compressor side spin also and force air into the intake system, therefore creating air pressure. A supercharger doesn’t work off the exhaust gas, it is attached to your engine and spins with the crankshaft. When the crankshaft spins the supercharger, it forces air into the motor. The turbo is more efficient as it doesn’t require engine power to spin it, so it makes more power per boost. A supercharger also does not create full boost until redline, which is when the engine is spinning the supercharger as fast as possible." courtesy of Redline 360.

If it's electrical, then there would be no power loss since it's not crank driven.
Take that air and fuel and JAM IT in there!
 

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An "electric turbo" ( or "electrically driven turbine supercharger" to expand the name in full) still consumes the same amount of energy to compress the intake charge as a crank or exhaust driven unit. The exhaust driven unit, a "normal" turbo charger, just gets that energy from the expansion of exhaust gasses which is effectively free. The power to drive an electric unit comes from the vehicle's alternator and is no more "free" than a regular belt driven supercharger. So why bother using one? Being electric you can turn it on or off, or vary it's speed, independently of the crank speed. Those with regular turbo vehicles know you need the engine spinning hard enough to spool up the turbine before you get boost and that you are reliant on the waste gate to control the boost pressure. Not so with an electrically driven turbine. With those the ECU can vary the turbine speed to give you full boost at any engine RPM, cut the pressure when you change gears, vary the boost to control pre-detonation from varying fuel quality, adjust to minimise fuel consumption on the fly ... there's a lot of mucking about that can be done if you have full control of the turbine separate from the engine. If you have a diesel engine you could even use it to recover energy from the intake air flow when you are going down hills ... at least in principle. Wouldn't work with a typical petrol engine though as there's not much air going into a stratified engine with closed throttle butterflies. There's a shit-ton of air going into a diesel though.
 

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pretty good explanation, though I would add that an electric supercharger driven by a motor does not require the turbine in the exhaust tract so eliminates a little restriction. For the same reason they sound a little better as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Perhaps better to describe it as a turbo with electric assist.

And the power needed to run the electric motor needs to come from somewhere, either a separate generator or from the motor running as a generator. Note they have a separate, higher-voltage, battery system to run it. So it is not 'free' boost. Running the motor as a generator allows the computer to control the boost without a wastegate, and recover energy (as electricity) that would otherwise go to waste. Often such systems control air input via throttle control, and boost dump valves, on the output, to reduce load on the turbo when the throttles are closed, to make it easier to keep them spinning.

In F1, they claim they have achieved 50% engine efficiency (fuel in vs energy out) through the use of turbo energy recovery as well as regenerative braking. A bit hard to believe when you see glowing exhaust manifolds and blue flames out the exhaust in night races, testament to very high exhaust gas temps. Indicating lots of untapped energy content.

Be interesting to see if there are applications for motorcycles, traditionally much smaller, but more highly stressed, engines, that require pretty instant throttle response
 
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