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Still new at this, but wanted to throw this out there. When I need to replace the chain I am thinking about an ek screw type master link. Has anyone tried it and what do you think?
 

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I have used several and they are the bee's knee's. No additional tooling, as good as a rivet and easy to install.

The last 2 EK 520 chains I bought the screw type master link came with the chain. So there was no need to buy and additional when you placed you order.
 

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Yeah. I think they are brilliant.
I have a hand crank rivet tool but these new master links require no skill or "marksmanship". I actually feel more confident with it.

I also got another one to toss into my I hope I never need this pouch.
 

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They work great!!!

Be sure not to over tighten the screw mechanism. I used a caliper to measure the basic width of the chain links and then tightened the master link to that same width.
 

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I am intending to try these links next time I change a chain. It seems that the only thing that you can do wrong is over tighten the nut, but surely that should not be too much of an issue as they are designed to break away, just like a pop rivet.
I found this helpful description and a suggestion online. I am picking that you need to tighten the nut to the end of the thread, but no further.


"I used the x-rings that came with my new chain, and the lube pack. The Screw-Link didn't come with lube (or instructions).

So, once you have the link in place with lube, o/x-rings and the sideplate is pushed on, you run the little black nuts onto the pins finger tight only. IMPORTANT: 1) the nuts have a slight chamfer at the threads on one end only that goes against the sideplate. If you muff this, you'll wring off the pin prematurely. 2) run the nuts in finger tight only. There's a reason for this that I'll get to next.

Once you're finger tight, you take a 5/16 or 8 mm wrench [IMPORTANT: little short wrench, please, NOT a 3/8" ratchet that's a foot long!!] and alternatively turn each nut 60 degress, or one hex flat. This is very important to do gradually and correctly, so that the sideplate is evenly pressed onto the pins. Remember, one hex flat at a time, alternating!

Eventually, the nuts will stop turning with the same basic amount of effort you've been using all along and won't want to turn any more, assuming you're using a little short combination wrench like I begged you to, above. There is no torque spec for this. You simply turn a hex at a time until you evenly press the sideplate onto the pins and the nuts "stop". Now your remove the nuts and throw them away! Have a look with a magnifying glass at where the pin and sideplate meet, and see how it all looks. You should see a very small sliver of the pin where it meets the sideplate, indicating the plate is fully on the pin with an interference fit. If you feel like you should press the plate further on one end of the link or the other, you can replace the nut(s) with the chamfer facing the link, and give it a tiny little bit of rotation, but be careful and don't get greedy, because I have more to tell, below. You really don't want to wring the pin off. It won't be fatal, as it will break at the groove nearest the sideplate. But you won't be able to do the additional little "peace of mind" step I describe below.

I mike'd the chain and the completed link. Chain was .898

and the Screw-Link was .876 This was the case for both times I installed the link, so we can assume the link is slightly less wide than the chain. If you use the same chain as I did, you should see these same numbers, of course.

Another interesting thing--as I was cranking the nuts down, I frequently removed them to see how the process was going. Once I loosened the nuts with the wrench, the nuts easily went off and back on with fingers only. However, once the nuts quit turning and the pressing action was complete, I noticed that the nuts would no longer come off by fingers once loosened by the wrench. I assume that at this point the pin threads had stretched a bizillionth, making the wrench sorta required for nut removal, unless you have real strong fingers.

So now if you're satisfied with the job, you simply snap the long ends of the pins off. It's real easy, using a basic plier.

So now, you're done. But as promised, I have some more good news. As it turns out, these black nuts aren't metric (!!), they're a good, ol' 10-32 thread. And if you notice, there's a few threads left after you snap the pins off!! So, I know what you're thinking---put the black nuts back on for safety. Wrong. They're way too long and hit inside the front sprocket cover. But, as you can see below, you simply use a quality 5/16 10-32 nut. Stainless would be cool! Do this: using lacquer thinnner or brake kleen, very thoroughly clean your hardware store nuts and the few remaing pin threads. Apply a dab of Loctite to each nut and thread onto the remaining pin stub. IMPORTANT: I torqued these nuts to a mere 30 inch-pounds, and I could feel the few meager threads beginning to yield. So, DON"T crank these nuts down, it's NOT necessary. [Remember the grinding I had to do to get the first link off? It's a tight interference fit!] Allow the Loctite to do its job to hold the nuts in place, giving you total peace of mind. These little nuts are the exact same length depth as the remaining pin stud, so you can be sure it will clear all the stuff up forward in the front sprocket area, but I strongly suggest you run it through by hand like I did before I fired it up for a test ride. Note: My addition of these "safety nuts" is not part of EK's directions. They provide little o-rings that go on the groove for the same purpose. I'll take the Loctited nuts, thanks."
 

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Very interesting and probably the ideal thing to carry for in the field or on the road chain repairs. I have not researched this yet as I've only heard of these recently. My understanding is the screw in master links are "chain brand specific". I will check and report back if I find anything; however, in the meantime, does anybody here know for what chain brands these are available?
 

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I tried one of these a while back and managed to literally "screw" it up ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

For context, the instructions that came with the set indicate something like "tighten until you can't turn any further". I used a short wrench, alternating between pins with consistent pressure. Eventually both nuts were tight, but I was careful not to overdo it. After unscrewing the nuts I inspected the link and found one side was binding just a little. Maybe it was fine, but I didn't think it was worth risking it, so I ordered a conventional rivet link and put it on instead. Not a big deal because I already had the tools.
 

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My understanding is the screw in master links are "chain brand specific". I will check and report back if I find anything; however, in the meantime, does anybody here know for what chain brands these are available?
To my knowledge EK only at this time, although others must surely be developing something similar.
 

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To my knowledge EK only at this time, although others must surely be developing something similar.
That has been my finding also. Most of their descriptions state: "Recommended for use only on EK brand xxxxx series chains"; but, some have a description that states: "Recommended for use only on EK brand xxxxx series chains - but may fit other chains".
 

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They work well but I found the DID chains last better for me.
I've gotten to capable at using the pressed on master links and once you know how to do those they are as easy as the EK's.
 

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I tried one of these a while back and managed to literally "screw" it up ¯\_(ツ)_/¯



For context, the instructions that came with the set indicate something like "tighten until you can't turn any further". I used a short wrench, alternating between pins with consistent pressure. Eventually both nuts were tight, but I was careful not to overdo it. After unscrewing the nuts I inspected the link and found one side was binding just a little. Maybe it was fine, but I didn't think it was worth risking it, so I ordered a conventional rivet link and put it on instead. Not a big deal because I already had the tools.
Had a similar situation, but it was ever so slight. I put a washer in between the nut and the link to push it even with just an extra turn.

Since this was my first use of this type of link, I wanted a bit of insurance so I put some thread lock on the exposed threads and snugged two small/thin nuts on for insurance.

Sent from my 2PZC5 using Tapatalk
 
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