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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #1
Could someone please talk to me about the Eastern Beaver handlebar wiring extensions? Have you installed them? What all did you need, and how much work was involved?

I put 3.5" Rox risers on my 2007 Vee a while ago. At the same time I put on +2" Galfer clutch and brake hoses, which was OK because the originals were ..well, original, meaning over 12 years old.

The electrical bundles were just barely long enough to still reach the handlebars, but there is almost NO slack, and it's begun to really annoy me over the last few months. For one thing, it's made my steering bearing upgrade painful.

I've looked at Eastern Beaver's stuff but I'm not 100% sure whether I need the "horn" extension as well as the "left" and "right" extensions. I have an aftermarket horn (Stebel), and it looks like there's only one wiring bundle coming from the left side of the handlebars.

I emailed the EB guy to ask but, I wouldn't be surprised if I got an answer something like "can't say, I'd need to see your bike."

I will be ordering a relay headlight harness from EB at the same time as the extensions. I have LED headlamps so I don't "need" the relay harness per se, but it's still a good upgrade to the factory wiring.

Previous owner wired in the Stebel, so I may have no choice but to perform exploratory surgery to see what's what.
 

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Wow,3 1/2 inches. You must have Tyrannosaurs arms or really long legs. I've gotten a couple EB products and they are well made so if there are wiring extensions for the moving of the handlebars I's guess they would work well.
The risers I got are much less, by half, the adjustment you got. Yup the original wires and brake lines are pretty much without slack.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #3
Not really, I have a boringly average inseam for a tall dude, long torso if anything. I used to have 2" Rox risers, angled back 15°-20°. That was pretty comfortable.

Those risers no longer worked once I installed a Scott's steering damper. I had to angle them forward to have room for the Scott's, which meant I was reaching forward for the bars, which was terribly uncomfortable.

I was forced to use 3.5" Rox risers. Only way to clear the Scott's and still be able to angle the bars back.

Bars are not a huge amount higher than they were with the 2" risers. The added height is nice for standing-on-pegs riding, and isn't a problem when on pavement.
 

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I have installed the EB extensions. They give you about 8" extra length. I highly recommend doing this instead of pulling on the wires. To install just remove the side panels and unbolt the radiator. Then you can unsnap the plastic radiator cover and push the factory clips out which will allow you to install the extensions. Put some dielectric grease on the connections when you snap them back together. I also ordered a few zip ties from EB that have the attachment point so I could secure the cables in the orig location. If you haven't done the brake and clutch cables do them so so you don't pull on them either.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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2,689 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That doesn't sound so bad. I was not looking forward to taking the fuel tank off yet again.

So you do need the Horn extension no matter what? It looks like only one cable coming off the left handlebar, but that could be just a sleeve that bundles two cables together.

I was planning to order a bunch of cable anchors/ties from EB while I'm at it. Can use them in other projects, and have been unable to find anything as good from domestic sources.

Thanks!
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Got a reply from Jim @ EB. Yes, I do need the horn extension.

For the heated grips plug, I realized that EB does already offer an adapter (with the proper plug). However it comes with a 36" wire which seems vast overkill for going from near the radiator (usual location of factory heated grips power plug) to the area of the handlebars. I guess Jim's thought is that it's a bad idea to pull heated grips power through the main harness - better to tap from a fuse panel or directly off the battery. I haven't had any problems using the heated grips plug up front, and even the Oxfords only draw up to 4A, so I'll pass.

I think what I'll do next winter is salvage the wiring from my existing heated grips. They may be Suzuki factory grips. They don't work very well and they are plugged into the factory heated grips plug. I can cut off the grips-side plug and graft it on to the Oxford's wires.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #7
EB stuff ordered. That website is dangerous! It's like a toystore for the electrical hobbyist. All sorts of stuff not otherwise obtainable in the US, and higher-quality versions of some things than I can find on Amazon etc.
 

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EB stuff ordered. That website is dangerous! It's like a toystore for the electrical hobbyist. All sorts of stuff not otherwise obtainable in the US, and higher-quality versions of some things than I can find on Amazon etc.
does anyone make extensions for the Vee2
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #10
When you spend so excessively, one of the benefits is your order gets airmailed (EMS). Mine left the EB shop yesterday, and should be on an airplane today. :)
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #11
I guess EB sends everything Adult Signature Required, or maybe the USPS imposes that on EMS shipments.

Either way, looks like I'm stuck in the annoying "USPS tries to deliver when I'm not home" loop. I had a USPS notice on my door when I got home yesterday.

It said the package would be available at a designated post office today, so we'll see.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #12
Got it! EB included some spare mini-fuses for the relay headlight harness. That's a nice touch. I could always go to VatoZone & get some but that saves me a trip.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #13
Relay headlight harness install completed. That wasn't so bad.

I chose the permanent, sealed PosiLock-style relay kit, so I had to cut off one of the factory H4 sockets & strip wire ends. This was tedious, as there is almost no slack on the OEM H4 sockets. Also meant I was not able to pull the PosiLock connection nearly as far away from other stuff was I would have wanted, while heating the SumiTube heatshrink. Managed not to melt anything I didn't want to though, and that SumiTube is amazing stuff.

PosiLocks are great. If I'd had to crimp that connection, it would have been way harder. There was barely room to swing a tool.

With that done, I installed the EB handlebar wiring extensions. Notes:

-you'll want to remove both of the large screws that secure the radiator from the sides (through the fairing), as well as the one that secures its bottom end to the engine casing, and the one that secures the left side of the radiator "hinge" on the frame (there is only one, on the left, not sure what's the deal on the other side). You need the radiator "floating" on its coolant tubes, so that it (and its heat shield) can be nudged aside to get the handlebar wiring loose.

--it was at this juncture that I realized the bolt that's SUPPOSED to be on the left side of the radiator-to-frame hinge, has been missing from my Vee for some time. Somehow the bushing that goes in the hole was still there. Whew! Going by Ace to get a new M6x20 bolt today.


Now, as to disconnecting the handlebar bundles so you can snap in the extensions:

-hope you have small hands. You'll need to work them up both sides of the Radiator Heat Shield (amusingly, made of plastic!) at various points. You have to get your fingers on the connections for the Left and Right main handlebar wiring clusters, and horn connector.

-Both Left and Right plug housings (the "bottom" end of the wire bundles) are snapped on to the back of the heat shield through a hole in same. Has to come loose, or you can't install the extensions.

--You'll need to grab each plug's post from the front side of the heat shield, with either your fingers or very long needle nose pliers, to squeeze its "wings" shut & allow it to be pushed back through the shield.

--Each lower plug end (the end belonging to the main wiring harness, which is not snapped to the back of the heat shield) has a tab you need to push in to disconnect. Easiest to do with the connected plugs floating free, should release with just finger pressure & gentle tugging on the wiring bundle.

-The good news is that the horn connection is floating free & pretty easy to get loose. Also the plug is small (2 wires) so easy to pull through where it needs to go.

Then I plugged stuff in & tested it to make sure everything still worked, before I got too excited.


Clean-up:

-Because Suzuki used non-sealed connectors, the plugs on the EB extensions are the same type. This is Not Great, as the "upstream" plugs will now be exposed to weather. This is unavoidable, as far as I can tell.

--Realizing that, I made my own "boot" for each plug, using a few wraps of electrical tape.*

--Once I had the extensions fully plugged in and tested, I gave each connection another couple wraps of electrical tape for good measure.

--Optional: I used red electrical tape. Why? It contrasts well with the (black) plastic sheathing on the rest of the wiring, and the white plastic plug housings. Should be obvious if it starts coming loose.

-one thing I did NOT do, was pack the connectors with silicone grease. This is an "old school" trick you will see recommended at times, for protecting unsealed electrical connections from moisture. The more I read about it, the more I felt the negatives outweighed the positives (pun intended).


Final note:

-If you're ordering the EB handlebar extensions, add some of the large- and medium-size, re-usable zip ties to your order. They are fairly cheap and are great for securing wire bundles out of the way. I prefer to use the widest one possible (largest size) so as to minimize stress on wire bundles. Re-usable is great as it will require some trial-and-error to find exactly where you want to secure the wiring bundles.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #14
"...and one more thing"

I used self-adhesive Velcro to secure the relays on the underside of the instrument panel cowling. That was the best place I could find to both tuck them out of the way & minimize "Oh shucks!" moments during future fairing removals.

The relays are light enough, and enough of the weight of the harness is borne by zip-ties to the frame, that I don't think they'll come loose even during unpaved riding.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Discussion Starter #16
"Industrial Strength" Velcro was no good. The hook 'n' loop is more than strong enough, but the adhesive melts & lets go around 100°F. Guess the stuff was meant strictly for indoors use, and only for vertical surfaces.

Next thing I tried was 3M Exterior Attachment Tape. Does not melt/fall off in the boiling garage temps, so far. Zip tie could be a good backup.
 
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