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Just finished the installation of the PC-8 accessory fuse panel on my new Wee3. For years, I had either tapped into existing circuits or gone directly to the battery. This is a much better solution, offering a default of two un-switched circuits and 6 switched circuits. I have done this on my last few bikes.

More info here: PC-8

No affiliation with Jim Davis who owns Eastern Beaver, just a satisfied customer. Jim did a great job helping me track down the new connection points for the 2017.

The trigger connector is no longer under the gas tank, it is now under the right subframe rail directly across from the battery:



Closer look:



This is Jim's plug and play connector. No cutting, splicing, soldering. Just plug in.

Relay tucks in above the battery:



Very neat installation with 3M posi lock above the tool compartment:



Only have one item attached now, battery tender line, which will also power my heated gear. Will be adding heated grips, GPS and LED driving lights.



Great kit!

Rob
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I see that like the newer 1000s, the 650's hot wire from the signals fuse is now also white with a green stripe instead of the older models' orange with a green stripe.
 

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Looks great, and nice work.

This (I think even an EB product) is going to be my little "winter project". But it scares the living peepee out of me.

I currently have an unswitched set of heated grips from the previous owner, want to install both a heated clothing/tender socket and a USB socket (both of which can be unswitched, I guess), and do some general tidy up.

Except, I have never soldered, I have never done a cable tap, and I'm just a big chicken. So, lie to me so I can send EB my money.

Maybe he'll send me a free one if I help clean up his installation PDFs..... :)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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EB stuff is plug and play, no soldering required. That being said, soldering is fun. It's really satisfying too. Make joints mechanically sound so they don't move while soldering. Get the joint hot enough so the wire melts the solder and you can see it run so it's not just contact with the iron doing the melting. Use rosin core solder. Affix soldered wires so movement like handlebar swing doesn't flex the joint after cooling.
 

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Clean bike and clean installation.
The plug and play sure makes for a satisfactory project and it's faster even if it costs a bit. I have a couple EB devices and they do make the job easy.
 

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Now I wish it had 10 circuits. Mine is filled. I have too much junk on the bike I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I see that like the newer 1000s, the 650's hot wire from the signals fuse is now also white with a green stripe instead of the older models' orange with a green stripe.
Yup. Shared the photos with Jim and he is going to update the site. He was not aware that the '17 650s had changed.
 

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Looks great, and nice work.

This (I think even an EB product) is going to be my little "winter project". But it scares the living peepee out of me.

I currently have an unswitched set of heated grips from the previous owner, want to install both a heated clothing/tender socket and a USB socket (both of which can be unswitched, I guess), and do some general tidy up.

Except, I have never soldered, I have never done a cable tap, and I'm just a big chicken. So, lie to me so I can send EB my money.

Maybe he'll send me a free one if I help clean up his installation PDFs..... :)
The Eastern Beaver PC-8 and the H4 headlight relay were the first real electrical projects I ever did, and I was a little intimidated too. In fact, there's a post on here somewhere where I took a photo of the headlight harness, numbered all the connections, and asked for someone to tell me which number connected to which other number; basically, it was like an electrical version of the old Garanimals clothing for kids (you know, a tiger shirt goes with a tiger pants, etc). It gave me a lot of confidence, though, and since then I've done a lot of wiring for different accessories, with never a spark or a whiff of ozone.

Learning to solder is a great skill. I learned it from watching Youtube videos. Now, I solder all my electrical connections when I do a project; I prefer it to mechanical connectors. It's permanent, it doesn't vibrate loose, and in tight areas a soldered joint takes up a lot less space than a crimp connector or wire nut.
 

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EB stuff is plug and play, no soldering required. That being said, soldering is fun. It's really satisfying too. Make joints mechanically sound so they don't move while soldering. Get the joint hot enough so the wire melts the solder and you can see it run so it's not just contact with the iron doing the melting. Use rosin core solder. Affix soldered wires so movement like handlebar swing doesn't flex the joint after cooling.
I love soldering! I was scared of it, too, but I got some basic DIY electronics kits from AdaFruit a few years ago, and now I solder my own keyboards (I'm a big :nerd:.. its like building your own lightsaber for computer engineers). Highly recommend picking it up as a skill.
 

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Thanks rwbandler. I have one final question. You, like everyone else on the internet who has done such a tutorial, whether pictures or video, did a great job of showing everything except one. Where the last connection is for the 2017 650 XT. By "last connection" I mean the one that goes into the switched circuit. Bare with me as I am a complete electronics moron. I can change out a ceiling fan or light and I can change out an electrical outlet and that's it. I guess that means, I know just enough to be dangerous. So, for this process of installing the PC-8, I know now how to connect the wires to the battery. I know how and what wires to connect where on the fuse block/PC-8. That takes care of five major wires. The last one is a connector with a male end and female end. In concept, it makes sense to me that there is currently a connection comprised of identical male/female connectors already connected somewhere on the bike. If I understand things correctly, I need to find that connection, separate the male and female and, in place of that connection I use the two I have to connect to that connection. First, is that correct. Second, where is it? Is it the one in your second picture which has two wires, one green and white and one brown/black/blue and white, coming out of it. I just don't want to screw this up. With me and electricity, I can see me doing something on my motorcycle and then have everybody in Springfield wondering what Homer has done now to cause their outage. I don't want to get Homer in trouble. Thanks in advance.
 

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I think you are looking for the powered connection that is coming off the rear brake light switch. The connector I used is located above the rear brake pedal as it gets into the battery area.
 

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Can anybody tell me if the one in the picture is the connection I should be using (middle one with white/green and white/brown)? Is the way to find out to disconnect the connection and check to see if I have brake lights?
 

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Is the way to find out to disconnect the connection and check to see if I have brake lights?
The wiring diagram from the factory service manual shows a solid brown wire powers your rear running light and licence plate light. It should be the same color wire as the one that powers your front parking light, which is super easy to remove and look at. Just reach under the beak and pull it out.
 

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That looks the same as mine. To be sure, disconnect it, activate the rear brake pedal and check for the brake light to come on. It shouldn't. But it will if you pull the front brake lever. I have the Eastern Beaver 3CS wiring harness. I test fitted it and all works as it should. I will be installing at a later date.
 

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The wiring diagram from the factory service manual shows a solid brown wire powers your rear running light and licence plate light. It should be the same color wire as the one that powers your front parking light, which is super easy to remove and look at. Just reach under the beak and pull it out.
That looks the same as mine. To be sure, disconnect it, activate the rear brake pedal and check for the brake light to come on. It shouldn't. But it will if you pull the front brake lever. I have the Eastern Beaver 3CS wiring harness. I test fitted it and all works as it should. I will be installing at a later date.
With no offense intended for either brock29609 or rooster shooter, these two responses combined with one another confuse me. Since I am not so insecure as to be unwilling to show my own ignorance, I will rephrase my question.

I assumed I needed to tap in to the brake light connection/wires, not the running light and license plate light connection/wires. First, am I correct? Next, I think that connection I identified above (white connector with white and green wire and white and brown wire) is the brake light wire. Disconnecting that, pressing the rear brake and observing actuation of the brake light will confirm that for me. Am I correct? Finally, assuming that I disconnect that white connector and I have no brake light when I press on the rear brake, have I now identified my correct trigger point? Thanks again.
 

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you are correct.
 

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I assumed I needed to tap in to the brake light connection/wires, not the running light and license plate light connection/wires.
If you're trying to tap into a wire that produces power when the bike is on, and doesn't when the bike is off, you want the running light/parking light/licence plate light wire.

If you want a wire that produces power only when you apply the brakes, you want the brake light wire which is white with black stripe, per my factory wiring diagram.

The connector for the tail light has a ground wire (black with white stripe) plus the two wires mentioned above.
 

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This gets more and more interesting all the time. I am a combat veteran; but, when I look at wiring diagrams and schematics, I just want to grab a blanket and a pacifier and curl up in a corner and cry. Having said that, I guess I'll have to do some extensive reading and learn more. Heck, it's what I do for most things. As ignorant as I am though, I am always willing to show my ignorance and to tap into the knowledge of others.

In the meantime, I belong to forums pertaining to all my hobbies. One of those is motorcycles. The nice thing about these forums is that one can rely on the experiences and expertise of others. The unfortunate thing is that you get different answers that seem to conflict when you are (I am) not the subject matter expert. I went last night from "problem solved" and ready to do this on Saturday to, this morning, I need to research it myself.

I originally got the feeling that this thread was about installing an Eastern Beaver PC-8 on a 2017 DL650 XT and, since I have an Eastern Beaver PC-8 and a 2017 DL650 EXT on/in which I wish to install it, I had found the perfect thread to get a simple answer. I do realize there is more than one way to skin a cat and everything I have been told so far, seems correct, based on my small pool of knowledge.

Now, going forward.

If you're trying to tap into a wire that produces power when the bike is on, and doesn't when the bike is off
Yes, I am.

If you want a wire that produces power only when you apply the brakes, you want the brake light wire which is white with black stripe, per my factory wiring diagram.
I do not want that.

The connector for the tail light has a ground wire (black with white stripe) plus the two wires mentioned above.
I will look for that. I assume it will have the exact connector provided by Eastern Beaver.

On another note. I would have assumed that there were two sets of wires for the rear brake light system. That there would be one between the power supply and the brake switch that would always be live when the bike is on and would satisfy our/my needs AND that there would be a set of wires for that rear brake "system" that would be dormant, for lack of a better term, until such time as the rear brake was depressed, actuating a switch, which would allow current to flow to the rear brake light/indicator. Even with very rudimentary electrical knowledge and understanding, that makes sense to me; but, apparently it is not the case. Yes/No?

To all of you entertaining and enduring my inquiries, don't let anything I said above make me sound like an ingrate. I truly appreciate your patience, input, knowledge and information. I want to a) do it right; and, b) learn better for future endeavors.
 
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