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Welfare Funder
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look nice. look forward to seeing reviews.
 

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Not those. I had some much cheaper sennheisers that didn't stay in all that well.

My Shure E2s worked GREAT under my helmet.

currently using Klipsch S4i, they work fairly well but not great. They have the iPhone remote which is great for controlling music. Sometimes hard to keep a seal when I put my helmet on. Once I get an autocom or starcom I won't be using headphones direct to the phone anymore. Either go with speakers or earbuds, I don't know which just yet. Depends on how speakers sound with earplugs in.
 

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It depends on your ears, some folks can fit their index finger up to the first knuckle. I need tiny earbuds and the only ones I've tried that fit are the Etymotic ER6i -- I'm happy with the sound too.
 

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I've tried a couple earbuds and just can't get comfortable with them, putting on the helmet they would slip and then try to dig into my brainless head. I opted for speakers. Bought two sets, chose to dig a hole into the helmet foam and recess the speakers. My ears stick out some and I can't do with the extra pressure. Kinda felt like Unkle Fester in a Vice.

I still have a set of very flat speakers if someone is interested
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Until I got these, I was not happy with any previous solution for getting decent sound, comfort and wind noise reduction combined. Some ear buds were fine for hours, but for more than one day of riding all day, they would actually make my ears bleed.
 

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If you happen to have the correct ear canal size some brands of in ear speakers can work very well. I fit and sell the Challenger series of in ear speakers (custom molds) If they are fitted properly they work better than any in helmt speaker since the block out the ambient wind noise and allow one to run audio at much lower levels than helmet speakers. Everyone tries to spend less but in the long run the custom ear mold route is the least expensive (they can be repaired when something goes wrong) and they are much more comfortable. Kieth (they also help save your hearing)
 

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Welfare Funder
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If you happen to have the correct ear canal size some brands of in ear speakers can work very well. I fit and sell the Challenger series of in ear speakers (custom molds) If they are fitted properly they work better than any in helmt speaker since the block out the ambient wind noise and allow one to run audio at much lower levels than helmet speakers. Everyone tries to spend less but in the long run the custom ear mold route is the least expensive (they can be repaired when something goes wrong) and they are much more comfortable. Kieth (they also help save your hearing)
Kieth,

Can these be mail ordered?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Until I got these, I was not happy with any previous solution for getting decent sound, comfort and wind noise reduction combined. Some ear buds were fine for hours, but for more than one day of riding all day, they would actually make my ears bleed.
Hey Pat. Wow, over $200 including shipping. I can get the Sennheiser's for under $50 total, though I admit that the custom fit adds a lot of value. How long have you been using your's? Any problems?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Those are inexpensive for custom earbuds. I've had them 3 weeks short of two years. I spent over $300 on other solutions starting with with high end earbuds and finishing with custom audiologist molds for those earbuds that stuck out too far and rubbed on the helmet. I had the most success with $12 Skullcandy Ink'd earbuds but they would hurt on the second day of touring and cause bleeding on the third. The custom Challengers fit entirely inside the ear except for the cord. I made the molds myself using their kit and they fit better than the audiologist's molds. The fit is always comfortable even after a week of touring and outside noise rejection seems as good as 29db foam earplugs. They show zero signs of wear.
 

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I like my Etymotic Research ER6i. The foam inserts block noise well also and you can buy replacement foamies. The other inserts they come with don't work well for me.
 

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I love my etymotics, but I hate the foam inserts, I prefer the large triple flange.
 

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If you happen to have the correct ear canal size some brands of in ear speakers can work very well. I fit and sell the Challenger series of in ear speakers (custom molds) If they are fitted properly they work better than any in helmet speaker since the block out the ambient wind noise and allow one to run audio at much lower levels than helmet speakers. Everyone tries to spend less but in the long run the custom ear mold route is the least expensive (they can be repaired when something goes wrong) and they are much more comfortable. Kieth (they also help save your hearing)
I disagree with your assertion that in ear-canal speakers are less harmful to your hearing than using a good set of earplugs and in helmet speakers, for several reasons. This is a little bit of a pet peeve for me, so I hope you do not mind the long and drawn out explanation:

First off, there is no in-ear speaker made that will provide as much attenuation to the potentially harmful ambient wind noise in your helmet as the better disposable foam earplugs do, such as the Howard Leight Max earplugs that I favor. These are readily and inexpensively available. Most in-ear speakers do not even state the attenuation they provide, but none that do make claims that are as high as 33dBa. For instance, the Challenger brand that you sell claim to provide only 25(+?)dB attenuation, so before we even begin to listen to any music the noise sound level reaching your eardrums will likely be higher when using in-ear monitors. This becomes increasingly important later on.

Secondly, while it is true that you will definitely have to turn down your music source to a much lower setting when using in ear monitors, all of the sound pressure that is being produced by those drivers is being directly ported through the ear canal and applied to your eardrums. Conversely, the sound pressure from a set of helmet speakers must travel though the same highly attenuating (-33dB) earplug attenuation as the ambient wind noise does.

If the earplugs and in-ear monitors attenuated ambient wind noise to the same extent, the amount of music sound pressure that would have to be applied to the eardrums to be discernible above that background noise, either directly in the case of ear speakers or after attenuation in the case of the helmet speakers would be identical. But, as previously stated, they do not. Which means that you will actually have to apply more sound to the eardrums to create the same perceived sound level.

Because the sound from in ear monitors doesn't get attenuated or filtered by foam earplugs, it is does sound considerably clearer. They sound just plain better! And most helmet speakers have to be driven nearly to the point of audio distortion just to be discernible after the earplug attenuation. But that also limits the user from cranking up the volume very much. OTOH, in ear speakers continue to sound fantastically good even when the applied SPLs are far above what is safe for your hearing. It is very easy to get carried away and cause real and irreversible damage to your hearing.


Full disclosure time: I have hearing loss and tinnitus from misguided, youthful practices and unprotected occupational exposure. And I still do use in-ear monitors for listening to music fairly often. But I limit their use to very low volume levels in quiet ambient environments. What little hearing is left in these old ears has to last me the rest of my life.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The Garmin Zumo I use for directions and MP3 audio don't drive the earbuds very loudly but I'll usually run them about 3 bars below max. Ipod users probably have a different situation.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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What bothers me is the need to tap my foot to the music somebody is playing on their Ipod five feet away from me. Talk about making the ears bleed.
 

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Fred W, count me among those people. I don't use ear buds but my Etymotics ER6attenunate at least as well as and probably better than most foam ear plugs. Claimed isolation is 34-36 dB.

I'm not an audiologist (and I'm probably going to prove it by my next statement), but I would think that to hear a sound at the same volume level requires the same amount of sound pressure. Isn't that how an ear drum works? So whether the sound is coming from a speaker through a foam ear plug or directly from a in-ear monitor, to be at the same volume, don't you have the same pressure?
 

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I found earbuds that go completely into the ear canal frustrating for three reasons: they would not stay put, or would be so tight they'd cause pressure and they blocked all ambient sound (and to get a solid fit often required changeable buds that would invariably get pulled off/lost).

I have helmet speakers in my full face, but for open face, I found these very inexpensive Sony sports buds that hang over your ear (so they stay in place comfortably inside the helmet) but do not totally enter/seal off the ear canal from ambient noise - which I want and rely on - I don't want to be totally sealed off to the world. These are so comfortable I seriously forget they are even there - because they hang just barely into the ear canal.

They produce more than ample sound from my Zumo 550 and sound just fine (I am not an audiophile, but won't tolerate crap either).

Price vs what they offer - to me, was so good I bought three more pair for spares! Check them out - for $20 they are worth a try and I think you'll be surprised - as I definitely was.

Amazon.com: Sony Mdr-As20J Active Style Headphones with Soft Loop Hangers (Black): Electronics
 

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Fred W, count me among those people. I don't use ear buds but my Etymotics ER6attenunate at least as well as and probably better than most foam ear plugs. Claimed isolation is 34-36 dB.

Hmmm. I just went to the Etymotic web site and they do indeed claim that they attenuate sound by 34-36 dB. If that is actually true it would be magnificent, but I am a bit skeptical until I can compare them with an earplug with a known high attenuation.



I'm not an audiologist (and I'm probably going to prove it by my next statement), but I would think that to hear a sound at the same volume level requires the same amount of sound pressure. Isn't that how an ear drum works? So whether the sound is coming from a speaker through a foam ear plug or directly from a in-ear monitor, to be at the same volume, don't you have the same pressure?
You are right, with one modification. Volume is variable because it is how we perceive the sound, relative to (over) the ambient background noise. That's why I previously said, if the noise attenuations were equal then the applied sound pressure to the ears would be the same to get the same perceived sound volume. All of the other in-ear monitors that I have ever seen or personally tested, including the custom formed ones made by audiologists, have something less than 30 dB of attenuation.

If these ER6 monitors actually do provide 34 or mare dB attenuation then they would be (slightly) better than using earplugs, with the caveat that you could still easily get carried away and (inadvertently?) boost the volume up to deafening levels while you are enjoying your tunes.

I need to get a pair of these things and try them. Maybe I'll be eating my words. ;)



I found these very inexpensive Sony sports buds that hang over your ear (so they stay in place comfortably inside the helmet) but do not totally enter/seal off the ear canal from ambient noise - which I want and rely on - I don't want to be totally sealed off to the world. These are so comfortable I seriously forget they are even there - because they hang just barely into the ear canal.

Amazon.com: Sony Mdr-As20J Active Style Headphones with Soft Loop Hangers (Black): Electronics

Of course those sports buds provide very little (if any) noise reduction, so they are not a very good idea if you value your ability to hear anything later in life.
 

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I have a pair of ZAGG Smartbuds that I really like. Much cheaper than others mentioned (if you grab a coupon anyway) with decent sound and noise reduction.

They come with a variety of tips, including a couple sizes of foam that I think work as well as earplugs.
 
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