StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need a bit of help. I installed the PowerMadd 45430 Risers on my 2014 DL650. I angled it back 45 degrees, and the ergonomic results appear to be about right. However, my cables are too tight. I ordered a +2" brake cable from Adventuretech, which should solve that one, but I'm concerned about throttle, clutch, and wiring. Reading what others have done, I plan to reroute those cables behind the forks. Here's where I need advice.

I've not removed forks from this bike, so I have no experience. Reading my shop manual, it seems that if I loosen the upper and lower clamps the forks should slide down. But the shop manual says I need to remove the front wheel and the fender. Is that necessary? Can I just loosen the clamps and drop them down about two inches, slide my cables and wiring behind, then bring the forks back into position and tighten it all back up?

Thanks in advance for your advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
You can, but it's going to be difficult dealing with the weight of the wheel. A better option might be to unplug the wires to reroute them without moving the fork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
I put 2" Rox Risers and different bars on my 2014 Wee and I was able to put the controls and everything though the space between the neck and the fork without removing the upper tree or forks. I did also put on the longer brake hose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
If you must change the routing, 2 ways how to try doing it:

1. Take the top part of the triple tree off: Unbolt the handlebar, loosen the top pinch bolts, remove the center cap-nut, lift off the top triple. Reroute, reverse the other steps.
2. Try to do one side at a time. Requires you to compress the fork leg. No load on the front wheel, loosen the pinch bolts on one side. Push the fork leg down, reroute, reverse the other steps.

An alternative may be to just drop the front 1/2" - 3/4" by sliding both fork legs up so they stick out of the clamp. May give you enough play in your cables.

Whatever you do check very carefully that there is no binding, pinching or stretching of cables, hoses and wires. Especially make sure your throttle works perfectly!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
2. Try to do one side at a time. Requires you to compress the fork leg. No load on the front wheel, loosen the pinch bolts on one side. Push the fork leg down, reroute, reverse the other steps.

Whatever you do check very carefully that there is no binding, pinching or stretching of cables, hoses and wires. Especially make sure your throttle works perfectly!
Thank you blaustrom. One side at a time. I hadn't considered that. Right now I have it on the center stand and a hydraulic jack under the engine to have a controlled lift of the front wheel off the ground. So, could I loosen the clamps on one side, lift the front end off the ground, then push down on the top of the fork on the loosened side, slide the cables under, let the jack back down to bring the fork back in position, tighten the clamps and the repeat on the other side?

It's the binding,and stretching that I am trying to remedy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
Try it, not sure you have enough grip to push against the spring. Just have the front wheel off the ground. The fork leg should come up on it's own or with little help since the spring is compressed. No need to lower the bike I think.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,716 Posts
So, could I loosen the clamps on one side, lift the front end off the ground, then push down on the top of the fork on the loosened side, slide the cables under, let the jack back down to bring the fork back in position, tighten the clamps and the repeat on the other side?
Good luck with that. Even if you had enough grip and strength the compress the fork spring by gripping the fork tube with both hands, you would then have no 3rd hand to move wires/cables.
Have you ever compressed a fork spring to replace the fork cap? That is demanding enough in itself. And you expect to compress that spring a further 4" by hand? I say no way will this work.
I would go back to re-routing wires and cables.
Even removing the wheel and front guard, and then sliding each fork tube down alternately has the opportunity to get complicated. Your brake line is already fixed, so just loosen the bars and slide them sideways, then slide the loosened but still assembled throttle assembly off the end of the bars and reroute it. Disconnect the clutch. What else do you need to move?

And I would be VERY careful routing any cables between fork tube and steering head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Dropping the forks did not work. Brockie was right, "good luck with that!" I was unable to compress the fork, so put that back together and will now try the first choice blaustrom suggested:

1. Take the top part of the triple tree off: Unbolt the handlebar, loosen the top pinch bolts, remove the center cap-nut, lift off the top triple. Reroute, reverse the other steps.
I measured the stem cap nut to be 32mm. Needless to say I will need to order a socket that large. So, I'll wait for Amazon to bring me a small box with an expensive socket next week.

Thanks for all the great help folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
How many miles are on the bike? Whilst you have the top triple tree off you may as well check the steering head bearings to see if they need a little tightening.

https://blacklabadventures.com/2012/02/28/steering-stem-bearing-replacement-upgrade/

Its for the older model but still applies. You need to make or buy the steering stem nut tool. Make at least 3 teeth. Instead of the pipe wrench just cross drill the pipe and use a large screwdriver or rod. The nuts are normally not very tight. Caution they are not steel and easily butchered, so make sure the tool fits reasonably well.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
How many miles are on the bike? Whilst you have the top triple tree off you may as well check the steering head bearings to see if they need a little tightening.

https://blacklabadventures.com/2012/02/28/steering-stem-bearing-replacement-upgrade/

Its for the older model but still applies. You need to make or buy the steering stem nut tool. Make at least 3 teeth. Instead of the pipe wrench just cross drill the pipe and use a large screwdriver or rod. The nuts are normally not very tight. Caution they are not steel and easily butchered, so make sure the tool fits reasonably well.

11500 miles. I was under the impression that I only needed to take that cap nut off to remove the plate, and then be able to re-route the cables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
At that mileage there is probably no need to worry about the steering head bearings. To re-route you don't need to do anything about the bearing. If the bike had 30k I would have tightened the bearing at the same time, since you have already most of that job done when taking of the top triple clamp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I rerouted mine by dropping one fork leg at a time. Pop the bike on a center-stand, stick the plate jack under the bash plate, and lift the front of the ground. Remove cable keepers from the triple tree and pop the pinch bolts loose. Gravity will help slip each fork leg down so you can slide the cable bundles between the fork leg and triple tree. My risers required moving the cables and a longer brake line and I'm glad I did, because the risers solved several ergonomic issues at once.

In the course of installing the new line, Rick and I discovered the brake line mount above the radiator comes in two flavors. The Galfer line didn't have threads inside the aluminum brake line block, but the stock line has threads in the block. Weird. I bought a nut and bolt of appropriate size and solved the issue in about ten minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
I rerouted mine by dropping one fork leg at a time. Pop the bike on a center-stand, stick the plate jack under the bash plate, and lift the front of the ground. Remove cable keepers from the triple tree and pop the pinch bolts loose. Gravity will help slip each fork leg down so you can slide the cable bundles between the fork leg and triple tree. My risers required moving the cables and a longer brake line and I'm glad I did, because the risers solved several ergonomic issues at once.



In the course of installing the new line, Rick and I discovered the brake line mount above the radiator comes in two flavors. The Galfer line didn't have threads inside the aluminum brake line block, but the stock line has threads in the block. Weird. I bought a nut and bolt of appropriate size and solved the issue in about ten minutes.


Still not understanding doing that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
It's a lot easier to loosen the bars and take the controls off, reroute everything and put it back together. Should take 15 minutes.
John, you and Highwayman 2016 both are telling me this. It does sound easier and I may come back to this. I guess I'm lacking confidence about messing around with removing throttle cables. My only advice is coming from this forum and I'm otherwise alone with this.

I took a break and got a 350 mile ride on my R1200RT today. Unfortunately, instead of clearing my head, my thoughts were stuck on my v-strom handlebar project.

I sure am grateful to all who have sent suggestions. Will keep at it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
In the course of installing the new line, Rick and I discovered the brake line mount above the radiator comes in two flavors. The Galfer line didn't have threads inside the aluminum brake line block, but the stock line has threads in the block. Weird. I bought a nut and bolt of appropriate size and solved the issue in about ten minutes.
Uh-oh! Does this mean that the +2" line I ordered from Adventuretech won't work without modification? Sorry for all the questions and my confusion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Uh-oh! Does this mean that the +2" line I ordered from Adventuretech won't work without modification? Sorry for all the questions and my confusion.
The +2" line on mine is still very tight...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
John, you and Highwayman 2016 both are telling me this. It does sound easier and I may come back to this. I guess I'm lacking confidence about messing around with removing throttle cables. My only advice is coming from this forum and I'm otherwise alone with this.

I took a break and got a 350 mile ride on my R1200RT today. Unfortunately, instead of clearing my head, my thoughts were stuck on my v-strom handlebar project.

I sure am grateful to all who have sent suggestions. Will keep at it.
When you get to the throttle cables under the housing, just take a photo. It's not very complicated under the housing. If I recall, it would be pretty hard to get the cables mixed up. Same with clutch cable.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top