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In my driveway trying to turn it around. Driveway is a bit slanted and it was just too heavy. Neighbors ran over to help me pick it up, embarrassing. Luckily the crash bars on the Adventure did their job and the bike ran just fine. :)

One question tho. The specs online say curb weight is 519 lbs. But the sticker on the side of my bike says GVWR of 915 lbs. Which one is right?
 

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One question tho. The specs online say curb weight is 519 lbs. But the sticker on the side of my bike says GVWR of 915 lbs. Which one is right?
They are both correct. GVWR is load capacity of the bike plus everything you carry, including yourself. Curb weight is just the bike itself, loaded with fluids.
 

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GVWR is maximum weight the bike can be with you and gear,gas,battery. I don't know whether the bike is weighed dry or with fluids. You can carry almost 400 lbs of rider and gear.
 

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Now go and make sure you drop it on the other side for good measure. I think my first drop came a month after I bought it and it's been on its side three or four times now. GVWR is the total weight rating of you and all your gear/passenger.
 

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Now go and make sure you drop it on the other side for good measure.
Yeah, the Universe is currently out of balance. We've got storms out in the Atlantic, a war in the Middle East, and my nose itches abominably. And it's all because of YOU!

Just go push it over onto the other crash bar, that's a good lad...
 

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Since I have dropped mine today also, I will hijack this thread to introduce myself ;)

First, the drop...
Slow turn, the engine died and... well, everything lasted maybe 2 sec. My wife jumped off pretty quick but it was too late anyway...
Nevertheless, my mistake fortunately not too much damage :D
Bar end, hand guards and passenger's foot peg scratched a bit, and that's it :)

I have been lurking for quite a while on this forum and it was one of the reasons why I got my 2012 strom. It was around a month ago, used 7.3k km on the clock... not so bad, I think.
Currently I live in Brussels, Belgium... strange place, nobody gives a damn when you want to buy something from them ;)

Anyway, hi everybody and thank you for all the information available here :)
 

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Thanks for the answers folks...
Zanth,

Where in Missouri are you located? I'm about 40 miles south of Kansas City.
 

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Drops happen, my first "drop" wasnt really a drop, wind storm and the neighbors shed came loose and smashed my bike down dragging it across the concrete about 40 feet. a black paint marker and 15 mins worth of effort and you would never know :D i've dropped it probably 10 times off road now, mud sucks.... i recently just crushed one of my Suzuki Trax ripoff box's. did you know they are made of steel and crush very easily?
 

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Trax Boxes

Drops happen, my first "drop" wasnt really a drop, wind storm and the neighbors shed came loose and smashed my bike down dragging it across the concrete about 40 feet. a black paint marker and 15 mins worth of effort and you would never know :D i've dropped it probably 10 times off road now, mud sucks.... i recently just crushed one of my Suzuki Trax ripoff box's. did you know they are made of steel and crush very easily?
The Trax boxes are actually made of Aluminum and are reasonably easy to pop back into shape.
My boxes were on the floor of the garage and some-one who shall remain nameless, decided to take my bike off the center stand and let the bike fall on the Trax boxes.
The crashbar made a nice imprint in the top of one of the boxes. I removed the lid and used a soft mallet to reform the lid, it popped out pretty easily and other than a slight stretch mark it looks OK.
 

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Like TwoShots said, dropping a bike in your driveway is distressing, not embarrassing.

You want embarrassing? Let me tell you about embarrassing.

Last week, I pulled into a parking spot in a shopping center that I go to all the time - I've shopped there for over 30 years - that has a drainage grate in the very middle of it. I can now tell you that this is the only spot in this lot with a drainage grate in it. The drainage is facilitated by having that grate be at the bottom of a concave depression, like the bottom of a little valley. Ha ha.

I may or may not have ever parked in this particular spot before in the lot, but I can tell you I'd never parked in it on a motorcycle. Because when I rolled my luggage laden DL650 over this depression as I parked, I suddenly realized that the center of the bike (right where my feet were) was about 4 inches further from the ground than the front or rear wheel was. I discovered this just as I was about to put my left foot down to kick down the kickstand to get off of the bike. (I had even already put the bike into neutral!)

Frantically trying not to tip over, I quickly kicked it back into first gear and accelerated forward past the concavity so my foot could reach the ground. But now my rear wheel was at the very bottom of the depression... And motorcycles, unlike cars, DON'T HAVE A REVERSE GEAR. I couldn't go forward out of the spot, either: the spot had a bumper at the end, and past the bumper (if I were to rocket over it) was a brick wall, and my front wheel was already up against the bumper. Riding off to the side was impossible, too, as both adjacent spots were occupied by cars.

So. Now what?

The normal thing to do would have been to get off of the bike and push it backwards through the dip. But I was really afraid I'd drop the bike while getting off of it because I was not exactly at the center of the dip, in rolling past it I was sort of diagonally stradding it. And my bike had about 50 lbs. of luggage on it that it doesn't usually have on it, because I was geared up for a multi-day road trip.

So I opted to try to rock the bike backwards out of the depression with my body weight. Since all my luggage was behind me in a full top case, strapped down on the pillion or as soft luggage on the sides, this was not easy. I went forward as much as possible to let momentum help me shoot backwards through the dip, but all that happened was that I got my rear wheel about 4-6 inches past before it rolled forward again into the dip. And now my feet didn't touch the ground again!

After what seemed like a VERY LOONG time, almost 10 minutes and with more and more people gathering to watch in amusement at the motorcylist stuck in a dip almost like a turtle turned onto its back, I managed to back the bike out of the depression. I was helped by the fact that I'm over 200 lbs. with a 34" inseam and the stock (not tall) OEM seat, so after repeating the go-forward, roll-backwards routine a few times, I caught the top of the momentum arc so that I could catch the pavement with my toe tips and kick myself further backwards ever so slightly. To accomodate the angle I'd pulled in at, I had to kick and shift my weight on the bike on alternate sides (first the left, then right side) while jerking my torso backwards at the same time to throw my weight into the backwards motion.

I got some sarcastic applause when I finally got out. Meanwhile some guy in a car had been waiting for almost half the time to take my spot, and when I paused to catch my breath after all that exertion, he honked for me to hurry up and get out of the way so he could park there!

Now THAT'S embarrassing!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Northern KC actually. Also thanks for sharing the stories. Now I don't feel so bad. Sounds like the bike can take a bit of a beating too and keep on ticking. That is good as I feel this will not be the last time I drop it. :)
 

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I still feel bad. Damned if I didn't just drop it for the second time today. I'm 6' even and filled my tank with piss and vinegar today. Pulling out onto the road, stalled (like a big a hole) and the bike went over to the right. THIS TIME I broke the ball off my brake lever, shattered the front turn signal assy and scratched up my cowling pretty fiercely...

Brake lever assy is just too damned expensive to replace ($80) unless you go aftermarket - but I'm afraid the aftermarket part may not fit right under the hand guard. Decided to deal with a lever without a ball (hey now) and order a replacement turn signal assy.

As for the cowling, I had been thinking about going flat black on the bike anyway...been reading about John Deere Blitz Black paint. Any suggestions? So, perhaps this is a blessing in disguise. Still a pain in the arse, for sure.

You aren't alone in your shame, any of you droppers :var_36:
 

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Last week, I rode up to a stop sign that was on T intersection, up hill that was also falling away to my left (if that makes sense). When I put my foot down there was nothing but air. The bike began that agonizing slow tip to my left and by the time I got my left foot down the bike was making the slow drop to the ground. On top of this, my right hand was on the throttle and as the bike was going down the throttle was opening. I had a death grip on the clutch lever and had the sense to reach for the kill switch and kill the engine. The bike lay carefully on its left side in the middle of the road. No one was around to see my embarrassment. Some scratches on the left fairing, the left mirror was pushed out of position but no real damage except to my pride. I still am unsure exactly how the drop happened. Surprisingly, the bike was fairly easy to pick back up and put on the side stand. I'll be real careful the next time I come to that intersection.
 

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Spaceoddity:
I also had a case of the drops in my garage. Broke the front brake lever too. Rode around with a "stubby" for a week, but needing to hit the brakes after a cager cut me off made me rethink my small stub. My fingers almost slid off the lever. Not good & definitely not safe. So I went to the stealership & paid $90 for the OEM replacement lever.

Well the same lever can be had for $60.50 plus shipping from:
HANDLE LEVER DL650 2012 :: DL650 2012 OEM Replacement Parts :: Suzuki DL V-Strom :: Street & SuperSport :: www.oneidasuzuki.com

But I also bought matching spare set of chinese CNC'd brake & clutch levers for $30 for the PAIR off ebay. 1 SET CNC Click Adjustable Brake Clutch Levers Suzuki DL650/V-STROM 2011-2012 | eBay

Crap happens.
 

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In my driveway trying to turn it around. Driveway is a bit slanted and it was just too heavy. Neighbors ran over to help me pick it up, embarrassing. Luckily the crash bars on the Adventure did their job and the bike ran just fine. :)

One question tho. The specs online say curb weight is 519 lbs. But the sticker on the side of my bike says GVWR of 915 lbs. Which one is right?
It's 519 lbs, when picking it up it feels like 915 lbs!

Most importantly, when you drop your bike, make sure no one sees you!
 

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Thanks, Capt. I hadn't thought of the brake lever slipping out of the fingers but now that I do, that's a nightmare of a situation. I'll pony up and buy one from Oneida.

Thanks for the web suggestion, too.
 

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for me, (thankfully!) the only times i've dropped my bike were trying to park it. there have been plenty of people around to see them each and every time, and man it is embarrassing. just don't make eye contact! :biggrinjester:
 
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