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Discussion Starter #1
A cracked engine case or worse is nothing to mess with.

I installed a new chain last month. At the time I didn't have the funds to buy the chain rivet tool for $100+ so I decided to use the clip-type master link temporarily. At the time I didn't realize how temporary that would be... I lost 2 of them!!!

The chain installed was a D.I.D. 525VM (came with a rivet link)
I bought the D.I.D. clip-type link (3 of them all together)
So as I don't get lots of "you didn't install it right responses" here's a picture of which way the clip was installed

Before I installed it I made sure all the surfaces where clean and there was enough of the pin showing that the clip could get into the groove on it.

In less than a week I noticed that it was gone.

I immediately ordered a Mike XS tool and in the mean time ran out and got a second clip and this time I added a bit of superglue to the backside before I clipped it in place. This one lasted about 2 weeks and was missing too.

I found this second one missing yesterday while at work (about 50 miles from home) so to get home I ran out and got a third clip and then went to Home Depot for some 2-part epoxy. With epoxy on the backside, and gooped all over and around the clip made it home fine where I changed it last night with a rivet link (which is what I should have done in the first place)

Don't cheap out and go with a clip-type link! I was extremely lucky that the outside link plate was on firmly and I didn't lose the chain. I've heard horror stories of chains going through the back of the engine case or getting wrapped up in the rear wheel.

On a side note the Mike XS tool doesn't come with instructions, I managed to find some for the D.I.D. tool which is virtually the same. At the end of this thread are some not so good photos of the tool in action last night in the garage.

http://www.dirtytires.com/forums/showthread.php?t=103

This is just here as information and not to bash clip-type link users. If you use clips religiously then more power to you. Go grab your own soapbox, this one is mine LOL
 

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852 Posts
I'm curious why people don't replace their chains with a continuous loop type...

It's a great opportunity to remove the swingarm, and grease the swingarm pivot shaft, pivot shaft bearings, and cush-link bearings.

It's not like it's beyond the skill level of the average bike owner.


???
 

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Premium Member
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573 Posts
Last year on my Canada trip I noticed that my clip was gone lubing the chain on the first day of our trip back.

Recently before taking a trip to Vegas, lubing the chain again noticed that the clip was gone.

I just ordered some new sprockets and a rivet type link from SVracing, I have a new chain already waiting to be installed.

Clip links suck!!!
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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5,522 Posts
Just dab a little silicon on the clip. It will still be there 20k later.

-GW
It would be interesting to try and figure out why some people have trouble with a clip link and others don't. I believe I read in another thread that you have been running a clip link for a long time. Last Fall, I too installed a clip link AFTER I messed up the rivet job. Then I started reading about problems people had with clip links and got paranoid. I bent a tooth on my rear sprocket that messed up everything, so I bought a new front and rear sprocket, chain and rivet tool. This time I did a good job and I am "not looking over my shoulder" when I ride.

But, it is interesting as to why some clip links plague people and not others.
 

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My last chain went like 26,000 km with a clip-type link on it. Mind you, this was the press-fit sideplate clip-type link, not the loose-fit sideplate type. My dealer said that part of their trick was to use the splitter/installer tool to pull the sideplate back out hard against the clip after installing it. Worked for me, but my current chain has a rivet-type link, which I'm more comfortable with.
 

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The clip may fly off if installed backwards - at least that's what I've always been told. FWD in the above diagram means the direction the link is traveling. It does not mean towards the front of the bike. I've used clip master links for years (from the sixties to the eighties) and never lost a single one. My '98 Nighthawk had one for 33k miles - probably 70 hp w/jet kit, K&N and pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The clip may fly off if installed backwards - at least that's what I've always been told. FWD in the above diagram means the direction the link is traveling.
In that particular drawing yes, FWD is referring to the direction of chain travel. In that case that would be a view of the lower side of the chain traveling towards the rear sprocket.

And again, I don't have anything against clips, I've used them myself on many bikes. I'm just saying... mine doesn't like them. $16 for the tool is cheap piece of mind.
 

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i don't trust master links either but they shouldn't be flying off like republicans from the bush administration.

i'm just sayin ...
 

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I'm also wondering why some folks have trouble and some don't. I've only used the riveted type so far.
 

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The illustration shows the clip going straight on like a side plate. I wonder if some are forcing the clip directly over the trailing pin and opening up/fatigueing the clip? I've always placed the clip over the leading pin and slid the open end rearwards toward the other pin, then squeezed the leading pin and closed end of the clip together with a pair of pliers, forcing the clip backwards over the rear pin.
 
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