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Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone else here has an issue with getting their key into the ignition - like me :confused:.

Everyday when it's time to get going, it will stand there like a shmohawk trying to turn the key to the 'on' position. Now, I am not an idiot, and I think I have "getting a key into an ignition" down pretty well but, it's impossible to turn the darn key. It's almost like when you are in a car, and you put the key into it's ignition, it wont turn if the steering wheel is pinched.

I am tempted to spray something down there to lube it all up. I feel as if dw40 is pretty gritty and would probably break something, so... any ideas? Is spraying anything down there a bad idea? Or do I need a workout routine for my right hand?

The bike is kept outside and it rains pretty much every SINGLE day however, I must say... the weather is looking mighty nice this weekend, any one in the area want to go for a ride tonight or tomorrow?
 

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Yes, it's a bit frustrating for me too. I have to push down a little and turn at the same time. Maybe it has something to do with theft protection
 

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I use WD sometimes, although I think a dry film teflon type lube is recommended.
 

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WD attracts dirt and will dry / evaporate to a sticky mess. It leaves a film residue behind. After ruining a few padlocks and other keyed items over the years, I will NEVER spray WD in a lock cylinder again. A silicone based lubricant will do much better or even some graphite. YMMV
 

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Spray some tumbler lube in there. Forcing it will just break something in the lock and you won't be able to use it anymore.

I've sprayed graphite in mine and everythign works fine now (but graphite's not the best thing to use; it's simply all I had at the time.
 

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Locksmith where I worked said never ever use WD40 on locks, they eventually gum them up. Something about the carrier holding grit. Don't know one way or the othere just saying. On the other hand i have heard of some fishermen saying they use WD40 on their bait, they thinks it attracts fish. Never used it for either. Dry graphite in lock and fresh bait for the fish. I do however like the smell and taste of WD40.
 

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There are various lock lubes on the shelves of your local hardware store...Lock-Ease is just one that comes to mind. They are usually graphite in a penetrating volatile solvent that evaporates, or just a spray of dry graphite works. Triflow Superior Lubricant is used by locksmiths and is also excellent on chains.
 

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while gearing up

I have had my best luck if, while I'm gearing up, I am seated. This places me directly in front of the ignition so I am not turning from either side, then I push the key into the ignition. Once the key is in the ignition, I push it in again, as if preparing to lock the fork, and allow the key to return up, to the normal position. The turn the key to start. This process has worked very well. I was frustrated the first few times I tried to start the engine and I adopted this procedure and it has not failed me yet. :beatnik:
 

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I had a similar problem, key wouldn't always turn in my DR650 sometimes. I had been spending a lot of time in Nova Scotia (moisture). I sprayed teflon chain lube into the lock (all I had at the time) and the problem completely went away.
 

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Yes, it's a bit frustrating for me too. I have to push down a little and turn at the same time. Maybe it has something to do with theft protection
You DO have to push the key in to turn it! However, I have a little fumble getting the key into the ignition in the first place - seems to stick at the entry point unless it is perfectly vertical. (I'm not about to send any lube into the cylinder for fear of buggering up the unit, but suspect I'm not alone either.)
 

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I do however like the smell and taste of WD40.
I thought I was the only one!

Key funky, needs a push down to preload it to turn easy, mine's a 2004 with 30K miles on it.
 

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insert key

insert key and push down
release
turn to right


yes - its fidgety :-(
 

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Try spraying a little lube on the key and allow any excess to run off before inserting the key into the lock. You may have to do it a couple of times. This will prevent an excess of lube in the lock and should miniumize gunk up of the lock. If this fails, I would then spray directly into the lock. If you do gum up your lock, you can clean it out by spraying it with alcohol.
 

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Graphite lubricant

Graphite lubricant for locks. Works wonders and doesn't attract crud.

(Insert HD rider joke here)


:thumbup:



It is also useful for sticky bongs...
 

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"Fluid Film" works well in locks as well.

Strangely and likely becasue of the push and turn thing, I often cant start my bike with my left hand but can easily with my right. (This was a issue for me from the beginning.)

..Tom
 

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One of those questions I'd never think to ask anyone but yeah! I do have trouble snick the key in just right. I agree with the replies about WD-40 and other petroleum distillate lube for any lock. One Idiosyncrasy I practice is no other keys or rings on the ignition key. Nothing to flap in the wind or make unfamiliar noises.
 

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I had a similar problem, key wouldn't always turn in my DR650 sometimes. I had been spending a lot of time in Nova Scotia (moisture). I sprayed teflon chain lube into the lock (all I had at the time) and the problem completely went away.
+1. Had the same issue on my KLR650. DuPont Teflon multi-lube (which I use on all my chains, so I had it sitting around) fixed it right up.
 

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Locksmith where I worked said never ever use WD40 on locks, they eventually gum them up. Something about the carrier holding grit.
Interesting. I've lived in the boondocks for 20 years, lots of padlocks on gates and some doors. I've always applied plenty of WD-40 when locks became a little recalcitrant... never experienced any gumming up, plenty of dirt and dust besides rain and snow in the New Mexico high desert environment. After a year or two after application, would do it again if locks got a little stubborn. Probably spent four or five bucks on WD-40 for that purpose over the 20 years... did the locksmith have a much more expensive substitute he wanted to sell you? Or perhaps WD-40 wouldn't have worked so well for me if I didn't know it wasn't supposed to work?
 
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