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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering if it should stay on the wish list. I can't imagine any tangible benefit here except the lifetime warranty and the ability to wash the unit. Can anyone please comment on this product? Thanks !!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
9 views and not one response so far. Looks like you guys are saving me some money and this little filter is coming off the wish list.....Thanks !!!!
 

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K&N

OK, I'll respond... I've used the K&N in both of my KLR's, and my wife's SecaII. When I do the next major service I'll probably put one in the V-Strom as well. There are people who love them, and those who hate them. If I were going to ride Baja, for example, I'd probably go with something a little different.

I know this doesn't help, but at least someone responded.. :lol:
 
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I use one but the main goal is to save money.

Knowing I will own the bike for 100k or more means a clean and oil instead of purchase of a new filter.

Can't say as I noticed any performance difference but that wasn't my goal
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Now we're talkin' - thanks guys. Good idea, this is a high miler bike for me too - I could use the savings. Maybe I will order it when the stocker is trashed and ready to be replaced. I'll just show it to my wife and she'll tell me to "throw that nasty thing away and get a new one"
 

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Original

I haven't looked at my original yet, 6 weeks and 5000 miles, but I'm expecting it to be a bit on the "crusty" side. I'll probably order mine about a week before I put her up on the stand for her end-of-year check u and put it in then. OR wait until spring... anyway I'll put in a K&N.
 

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I installed a K&N filter. Mainly to save some €, because I have to replace my filter every 12.000 km.

I am very happy with it. :lol: :lol: :lol:

The only disadvantage : +0.5l/100km.
 

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I used to use K&N's in my vehicles until I researched it more indepth. The fact is they flow more air because it is full of holes that let more air thru. Hold a freshly cleaned and oiled K&N filter up to a bright light and look thru it. See all those holes?!?!? Those holes let dirt thru. Google K&N. Do your own research and make an informed decision.

If you must have aftermarket look for filters that use foam as some part of the filter. This oiled foam catches the dirt as it tries to wind its way thru. As opposed to the K&N that only has a single layer of oiled cotton gauze. shock:
 
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True enough. IMHO if you are keeping your bike for the long haul, stay stock. That being said I run a K&N in my Mazda6, in my last vehicle a 99 Suburban, and in my last bike a Kawasaki Drifter.
 
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Common sense is prevailing! If it flows more air, then it MUST flow more dirt! I would say it Depends a lot on your riding conditions. I you ride in a damp enviorement a k&n is probably a lot less harmfull. I live in Arizona and it is usually very dusty. I change air filters at 10,000 miles on everything, but i wouldnt be beyond blowing one out with compressed air and changing it at 20,000.
 
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Common sense is prevailing! If it flows more air, then it MUST flow more dirt! I would say it Depends a lot on your riding conditions. I you ride in a damp enviorement a k&n is probably a lot less harmfull. I live in Arizona and it is usually very dusty. I change air filters at 10,000 miles on everything, but i wouldnt be beyond blowing one out with compressed air and changing it at 20,000.
 
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I have raced dirt bikes: moto-x, desert, enduro, etc etc for over 30 years. I've used a ton of differing filters, of all shapes and sizes. I finally stuck with K&N filters, and have been using them for a long, long time. I've never had any reason to doubt that they do as they claim. I've run some hellishly dusty desert races that clogged my lungs up but good... the bike however, never suffered once. I'm sold on them for that.

As to how they work on street oriented bikes, I can't really say. I'd assume that they work as well... but as to adding power, and making changes the ECU can deal with, I'll leave that to better riders/flow engineers to answer. I've read pros and cons on them here and elsewhere. I'm not really sure what filter I'm going to use when my 'Strom needs it, yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
gunnar#1 said:
Common sense is prevailing! If it flows more air, then it MUST flow more dirt!
You're assuming a molecule of air is the same size as a particle of dirt.
 

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I have a K&N on my 2003 V-strom 1000. Only reason I got it was because the local dealer didn't have a stock one, and couldn't find one other than K&N aftermarket. It may have helped power a little. Course that could have been because I was replacing a dirty filter with a new one. Also it may have helped the "chudder" problem a little. Still have the chudder even after replacing with updated clutch.
 
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yeah, i use K&N air filter and like it because, i can clean and reuse. i was surprised to find my stock a.f. was dirty after only 5k. this is because, the air box intake faces foward and scoops up bugs as i ride. IOW, i check, clean and, reoil a.f. every 5k.
 

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Just cleaned my K&N after about 6000 miles. It was dirty. Also took out the secondaries at the same time and could not see where any dirt had gone past the K&N and into the throttle bodies. Always had a negative opiniion on K&n air filters but fairly happy with the one I have for the V Strom. Nice not to have to run to the dealership and having to order an air filter, then pay again for it.
 

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I have used K&N in my four wheel vehicles but I won't use them in a bike that sees off pavement use. When the company sells a product for their filters to be used in conjunction when in dusty conditions it has to say something about the product, right? Well that is what the "PreCharger filter" is, an additional layer of protection for use in dusty conditions as recommended by K&N.

The K&N advertises and states it will flow more air than other filters, and the ONLY way to do that without increasing the size of the filter is to reduce the filtering ability, which is the only restriction to air flow.

For example on the K&N for the KLR 650m it's surface area is about 20% smaller than the oem foam filter because the entire top of the filter is a metal cap, which in my experience has shown that solid metal caps don't allow air to flow very well.

So how can this filter with a significant less surface area flow more air? Only by filtering less, this isn't rocket science. So one can disregard this example or ignore the maker of the products suggestions for use in dusty conditions and use them... but it is your bike.

As to the large bugs and other objects found on the air filter, I reduced the accumaltion by about 80% or more by using a piece of aluminum gutter screen and mounting it over the air intake, it catches most insects and small animals that before were drawn into the airbox previously.
 

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Brad,

I think your idea to use some screen over the "snoot" is a great one. I have never had a bike that will pack a filter with micro-critters as quickly as the Strom. That's one of the first things I will do to my next Strom just as soon as it arrives. Bravo.

On the K&N analysis I fundamentally agree with you. I have read a bit about this before and it makes sense.

One thing you haven't considered however is the filtration surface area is not solely determined by the outer dimension of the filter media. To determine the exact filter surface area, you'd have to go microscopic to see the topography of the filter. You'd then have to add up the surface area of all those mountains and valleys. Now I don't know if the K&N really is any more hilly than an OEM paper or other brand foam filter media, but if it is, it will pack more filtration surface area in an equivalent outer dimension.
 

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Well, actually I have considered it, though on the KLR filter a 20% reduction in total area is going to tough to make up but lets consider it from that pov.

The K&N is composed of a cotton gauze material per their website, a reasonably good filtration media, it has numerouss fibers and strands in very small diameters and lengths which will intertwine to form the filteration area. Per their site the filters are made up of 4 to 6 layers of this material.

But considering the surface area of this material it is basically a strand of cotton, a method of actually measuring the exposed area of each strand would be difficult but the limits of, (Pi x radius squared x Length)/2 would give the greatest possible area for each exposed portion of a strand, multiply that by number of exposed strands and one would have a rough estimate of the total surface area.

Now consider the foam filter for the KLR, the filtration area of foam is actually a much more of a 3 dimensional surface than a semi-circular strand of cotton. These filters are made by pushing air through the foam in a liquid state in the construction and based on the volume of air pushed through it the diameter of the "holes" in the filter can be controlled. These holes are actually interlocked bubbles and when trimmed to shape these bubbles are sliced open. The exposed area in some are smaller than the bubble diameter, some larger, and of course some right down the middle.

And as we probably all learned in a basic high school science class, the greatest surface area of any 3 dimensional object in the smallest volume will be a sphere, inside or outside of the sphere this rule holds true. And it is the inside area of these bubbles or spheres that are the surface area that is doing the filtering of the air.

To calculate the surface area of this filter would require first measuring the average diameter of the spheres and then the area of the average which I believe is 4x Pi x radius squared, then the average number of spheres per square inch/cm/mm or whaterever times the total area in the same unit of measure used previously.

I do believe from first inclination that the foam will have more peaks and valleys in the most efficent shape (for surface area anyway) than a strands of woven cotton will have.

Now I may have gone a long way to nowhere :( when you were in fact referring to the folds of the K&N but my 20% difference is already taken that the K&N has these folds into account and in fact if you have ever taken a fluid dynamics course you will be aware that these folds are actually counter intutive to actually adding flow to a liquid or a gas. The short version reason is that as you have previously noted in any air filter with these folds the majority of dirt is trapped in the interior of the folds but almost never on the peaks between the valleys.

But if you think about it, air or fluid will attempt to travel the shortest and least restrictive path, a straight line. Air flowing through the sides of the valleys will actually encounter air attempting to travel in the opposite path and will restrict the flow. Imagine the air flowing this direction --> and this direction <-- through the sides of this ^^^. like so --->^<--- . And you can visualize what I mean, the counter directions and the radical turn the flow must make means very little is added to the actual flow UNTIL the valleys are actually packed with dirt and air must go somewhere, like I said it isn't rocket science but it is fluid dynamics and these are well proven effects.

So to end this treatise :wink: , IMO if one is going to use the bike solely on the street the K&N isn't a bad thing but anywhere where dirt or dust is going to be part on the enviornment I will forego the use for what I believe to be valid long term damaging effects these filters can have. 8)
 
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