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Discussion Starter #1
Do the wheel bearings on a dl650 ever need to be repacked with grease. If so, how often should I do it?

Thank you.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Getting the bearings out destroys them. The seal would have to be removed and replaced to repack and that doesn't work well. If they rumble when turned, replace them with bearings sealed on both sides.
 

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Getting the bearings out destroys them. The seal would have to be removed and replaced to repack and that doesn't work well. If they rumble when turned, replace them with bearings sealed on both sides.
OK, I'll just check them periodically then. Thank you.
 

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If the bearings show any rust or have the slightest bit of roughness, replace them.

A local bearing supply house may offer the best combination of top quality bearings and best price. All are standard industrial sizes. Bearings with the suffix "-2RS" (may vary by maker) have two resilient seals to keep grease in and crud out. These contain a very long life grease, probably a polyurea base grease. Be the way, the rear has three bearings, two in the wheel hub and one in the sprocket hub.
 

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If the bearings show any rust or have the slightest bit of roughness, replace them.

A local bearing supply house may offer the best combination of top quality bearings and best price. All are standard industrial sizes. Bearings with the suffix "-2RS" (may vary by maker) have two resilient seals to keep grease in and crud out. These contain a very long life grease, probably a polyurea base grease. Be the way, the rear has three bearings, two in the wheel hub and one in the sprocket hub.
The sprocket hub bearing ain't cheap. I repacked mine at 65000kms. Still going fine at 86000kms. Replaced all others with sealed units.
 

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When you drive out the old one, keep one and grind the outer surface down a few thousandths. Use the old one for a bearing driver by laying it on top of the new one to tap it in by driving on the outer ring, NOT the inner ring. Freeze the new bearing overnight first and WARM your hub with a heat gun just warm enough for a little expansion. The new bearing will slide right in with minimal effort. Buy a good quality Timken or SKS bearing when you do this. Your bike most likely has Chinese bearings that'll give up the ghost early on, mine did.
 

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and a bad wheel bearing sounds like ... ?

This might be a good place to start with this question...

My Wee, at ~26k miles and first cold season with me, has started making a noise that I don't like. I have had a hard time figuring out how to describe it or what it may correlate with:confused:.

The noise happens only when rolling, never when stopped, and it seems to come from up front somewhere. But when rolling, I can't correlate it (presence/absence/frequency/loudness/whatever) with anything other than being not stopped. For a while I wondered if it was wind noise around some of my touring junk up front, since it started during a stretch of days turbulent headwinds - but it continues with the bike stripped for local riding. It kinda seems to maybe correlate with temperature - started as fall temps started to drop and seemingly more present when colder. But since temps have dropped steadily for the past few months, it's hard to distinguish that from simply being more present. I haven't been riding much in Dec/Jan, so not much recent data, other than that it's still there sometimes. Of course, when I took the bike to a shop of good repute in November, it make the noise I don't like on the way there, but wouldn't do it for either the mech of good repute or myself for the rest of that day:headbang:.

So - dear wiser strommers...

How can I tell if it's a wheel bearing?

Any other ideas?
 

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How can I tell if it's a wheel bearing?

Replace the wheel bearings and see if the noise goes away.

Wheel bearings are cheap and easy to replace.

Spending this much time, worry, and thought on it is expensive.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Prop up the bike so a wheel is off the ground. Spin the wheel by hand with a finger of the other hand on the axle. A bad bearing will vibrate the axle and probably make a rumbling sound. A good one will be smooth.
 
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