StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For the past year I have been wearing an inexpensive pair of motorcycle boots (Nitro Techsport). Although they were pretty inexpensive they seem to fit quite well have a flat sole and offer a fair amount of protection.

http://www.powersportsnetwork.com/enthusiasts/catalog_item_detail.asp?catalog=2378&levelcode=9647&product=234566&cattype=&ProductCategoryCode=

This past week a friend of mine left the Canadian armed forces and he gave me a brand new pair of Canadian military wet weather combat boots as per the attached link. I have worn then a few times and they are extremely comfortable, have a Gore Tex lining, insulated, and have a rugged tread.

http://nextadventure.net/gallery/shoes/prospector_tacticalgtx

I was thinking of using these as my boots for riding instead of the Nitro's - what would you guys wear if you had to choose between the two?

Any significant advantages from one over the other, other than the fact that the combat boots are Gore Tex lined.

Thanks in advance for the feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
They should provide good protection from road rash, but they do not have padding/armor to protect against impacts in a crash. As long as that is an acceptable trade-off for comfort, go for it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,722 Posts
I wear them to work since they are more comfortable for all-day wear than my riding boots. Just make sure to keep the loops in the laces under control because they do tend to get hung on things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Yes I ride in Danner steel-toed tactical boots with the zip side and have done so year-round for several years. As we are fortunate enough to have the Danner Factory Store (as well as the factory itself) located nearby they can be bought for far less than the retail price. Very comfortable. Waterproof. Indestructible.

http://www.danner.com/product/boots/acadia+mens+steel+toe+uniform+boots.do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
I happen to be wearing the late 90's Army combat boot I was issued. I'm wearing them these days for work, and they work fine for riding. They're the all black leather non-directional tread w/ speedlaces type.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
Up until last June, I wore my last issued pair of combat boots as riding boots. I'd pretty much soaked them in Sno Seal to try to make them waterproof. We had such a wet spring/early summer that I finally broke down and bought a pair of Alpinestars Web Gore-Tex boots. I still have my combat boots, but man those Alpinestars sure are nice...

BTW: I got out in '99, so the boots served as riding boots for 10 years. Not bad. . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I wear my US Army issue winter boots for wet/cold weather riding. They're warm, completely waterproof, and extremely comfortable; I don't mind the trade-off one bit. Of course I have like 3 pairs; and hey, they were all free if you don't take the less than 3 years of military service into account.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I've always worn the hunting/combat style boots since starting riding, and have had the (USA) army-issue Matterhorn boot. Made in the USA, in PA. It has a non-steel hard toe, and is waterproof, even when standing in water for a long time. The only real waterproof boot I've ever owned, even though most of mine were labeled as such.
Matterhorn has an insulated version, and also has a "chain saw" boot which is layered with 7 layers of Kevlar and is also waterproof. I like these type boots as you can wear them to ride and then walk/hike comfortably if you want.
Saves on taking an extra pair of shoes along.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,198 Posts
Used to wear some Hermans Survivors and Danner Ft Lewis boots because they are readily available in 12EE.

The Ft Lewis is a superb boot. But they don't keep rain out after an hour or two.

Now I wear Daytona RoadStar GTX, because of the motorcyclist-specific CE armor. Lighter, a little cooler, faster to take on and off, better protection, but double the price.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I would use the motorcycle boots because incase of emergency and you have to put your feet down, the sole on the motorcycle shoes are meant to protect you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
I've always worn the hunting/combat style boots since starting riding, and have had the (USA) army-issue Matterhorn boot. Made in the USA, in PA. It has a non-steel hard toe, and is waterproof, even when standing in water for a long time. The only real waterproof boot I've ever owned, even though most of mine were labeled as such.
Matterhorn has an insulated version, and also has a "chain saw" boot which is layered with 7 layers of Kevlar and is also waterproof. I like these type boots as you can wear them to ride and then walk/hike comfortably if you want.
Saves on taking an extra pair of shoes along.
I like the idea of such boots and agree with your reasoning.

My sole (get it? :biggrinjester:) attempt at dual purpose boots, though, was a pair of Red Wing work boots, and I found them much too stiff and bulky for working the shifter. Like others, I am also not comfortable with their lack of crush protection for the ankle. I'll keep an open mind, though ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Military boots are all I've ever worn. And I wear mine, cutting wood, cutting grass, working around the house, going to Canadian Tire, etc. Riding boots can do none of that within reason.

For the folks that say they offer no sole or ankle protection, what kind of sole or ankle protection are you expecting?

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
For the folks that say they offer no sole or ankle protection, what kind of sole or ankle protection are you expecting?
I don't know what is meant by sole protection, but riding boots generally have armor over the ankles. I'm not saying that lack of it is a dealbreaker, but it's something to consider.
 

·
Living the Stereotype
Joined
·
11,543 Posts
I occasionally wear a pair of Irish Setter hunting boots:



They go up over the ankle, have relatively small toes to allow easy shifting and are very comfy. I hiked extensively with them so if I ever have to leave a disabled bike somewhere in the boonies, unlike many moto-specific boots, I know I won't end up with hambergerfeet when I stumble back into civilization. They breathe well and are fairly water-resistant, but not at 60 MPH.

To keep the laces under control I wear long socks, folded over over the top of the boot. The grippy soles are great when putting your foot down at a stop on slop. For better ankle protection, I think there's a calf-high version available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,198 Posts
//
For the folks that say they offer no sole or ankle protection, what kind of sole or ankle protection are you expecting?

Ken
The EU has safety standards for riding boots. So in the absence of any other research, I expect CE-level protection.

I rode home from an accident that might have resulted in a crushed or broken ankle with combat boots because the lip around the sole probably would have trapped my ankle under the bike while being knocked over from the side by a car at 40mph. Instead I scraped some leather and rode home with a sprain. This looks minor but the other side of the boot was chewed up as well.

BTDT, I wear the MC boots now whenever I ride. $400 is dirt cheap compared to a hospital stay.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,317 Posts
For those of you who do wear these type of boots.

Cut a section of car or motorcycle innertube [of the right diameter to suit the calf of the boots] then when you tie the laces pull the innertube up [or down] over the loose section of the laces to stop them tangling in stuff.
The inner tube needs to be tight enough to not slip down the boot and if the length of the tube is right [around 4 inches or 100mm] you simply pull the innertube down to the ankle are of the boot to untie the laces then pull it back up over the laces when re-tied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
According to AR 670-1 when wearing the combat boots the laces are required to be tucked in anyways so for me it's just habit. Now that I'm riding motorcycles with my army boots on I have two good reasons to tuck the laces in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I just wrap my laces around the top of the boot once before tying them, and there is no long slack or large loops. I learned to tie laces small because I got BOTH laces tangles up on the footpegs of my first dirt bike years ago (125 Rapido- thats how long ago) at a stop sign, and fell over with my feet helplessly dangling just inches from the ground.

I've been in two accidents at speed, one in which the bike went down on top of my leg (broke both my leg among other things). My feet were ok.

But, I do have to say, that almost everyone I know who has had a motorcycle accident, at speed on the road, has had a hole worn through one or both boots. (I really don't know any friends who wear motorcycle specific boots, but if they suit you, I would think they're better) I cringe to see people riding in sneakers or even nylon-sided boots, cause it wouldn't take much rubbing on the asphalt to wear your ankle bone down to a nub without leather over it, even in a "mild" accident.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top