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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I've got 2200 miles on my 2019 DL1000XT, and am curious about a ticking sound the engine sometimes makes.

It only does it after everything is warmed up to operating temperature, and it's not anything nasty like a rod knock or heavy machine noise. It's a distinct light ticking sound, probably seems much louder to me than it actually is because I'm sitting on top of it, RPM-dependent, that's audible in the lower gears between about 2.5k and 4k RPM. It may do it after 4k, too, but at that point there's enough background noise that it's drowned out.

First guesses would be maybe it's spark knock or a valve that's a bit loose (do these machines have self-adjusting lifters?), but that's guesses.

Could this be the double-ignition that I'm hearing? Is it just a noise that these engines make? I may take it by the dealer just to have them listen to it, but it's more curiousity than concern. She runs just like she should as far as I can tell.

And of course, my first line of troubleshooting is to choose a new exhaust to give her a bit more thump :grin2:
 

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It's definitely not lifters; the engine is a dual overhead cam, so there aren't any.

I've been on the forum a few years now and I don't think I've ever heard of double-ignition as a characteristic problem of these bikes. What's supposed to be occurring during double ignition?

These bikes do make noises. The late lamented forum guru, Greywolf, always said the solution to most odd noises that this bike made was a set of earplugs. If I was in your shoes though, and the bike was brand new, and was consistently making the same noise, I'd probably swing by the dealership to see what they say. Either that, or post a video on here of the bike while it's running and see if anyone here can identify the noise and say if it's normal or not.
 

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I feel your pain.

The third or fourth time i expressed worries about the odd sounds of the engine, my mechanic took the time to explain every single noise, and the part it was related to. While the engine was opened later on, parts were inspected, everything was mint. I think i heard a new sound on my road trip to AC, or it might just be that my music wasn't as loud as usual.

:grin2:




Ps: In case of doubt, don't take a chance and consult your mechanic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
DOHC engines have lifters, too, hollow pucks that sit between the cam and valve stem, in the case of mechanical lifters there's a precision shim under said puck that one adjusts to set valve lash. True, it doesn't lift in a literal sense, rather is pushes, and maybe it isn't even called a lifter, but anyway that's the device I was referring to.

It's good to know that others have ticky engines, too, if that's simply what these engines do then ok.

I'll bring it by the shop anyway, also as mentioned it's cheap insurance since the machine is new, and if all is well then a thumpier exhaust will help.

Thanks, guys!
 

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Earplugs!:grin2:

My 800ST BMW sounded like a can of bolts shaken vigorously at startup.
The Wee has some sounds.
My earplugs takes away the scary but not life threatening sounds.
 

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That "puck" you mention is called a bucket. Shim and bucket design. Most stable design for mechanical valve clearance there is. DOHC engines can have a design with followers. Which are in many ways similar to a lifter/rocker assembly on a non overhead cam engine.

Yes, these engines are very noisy. They have straight cut gears in the valve train. And the power train to the transmission. The cam chains can and do make noise, especially at idle where the crank speed varies with each piston firing and the dead time between them.

You can take the bike to the dealer. But they don't work for nothing, and all too often they get in situations where they just cannot satisfy a customer with a noise complaint.

I have found that once you and the bike get over your honeymoon, all sorts of noises and issues might become apparent. Normal. I suspect you too would think the noise normal would you have a chance to ride a couple other newer DL 1000's. What you want to watch for in noises is a CHANGE. If it stays the same, that is probably good. If it changes, you then want to know why.
 

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V-Stroms have one of the most reliable motors made for motorcycles.
Don't let the noises bother you just ride it.

Compare it to a dry clutch Ducati, you'll think a Strom purrs in comparison!


Yea wear ear plugs of course like you should on any bike.
 

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From your description that's not a normal DL 1000 sound.

Could be fuel. Try using premium for a couple of tanks.

The other thing that can cause that is a an exhaust leak (Air mixes with the mostly but not completely burnt fuel in the exhaust and it ignites). You'll usually see an oily stain near the leak point if it is that, that would be a really rare problem on a new bike.
 

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I'm using a cheapy helmet intercom with bluetooth to play music or FM radio from my phone. The helmet speakers are plenty loud, so if my Wee ever blows up, I won't know it until the oil light comes on. :grin2: You're lucky, you have the advantage of a warranty!
 

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DOHC engines have lifters, too, hollow pucks that sit between the cam and valve stem, in the case of mechanical lifters there's a precision shim under said puck that one adjusts to set valve lash. True, it doesn't lift in a literal sense, rather is pushes, and maybe it isn't even called a lifter, but anyway that's the device I was referring to.

It's good to know that others have ticky engines, too, if that's simply what these engines do then ok.

I'll bring it by the shop anyway, also as mentioned it's cheap insurance since the machine is new, and if all is well then a thumpier exhaust will help.

Thanks, guys!

That's not a lifter, it's called a bucket. That's why I didn't get your meaning, because some older pushrod type motorcycles (like older Harleys) do have lifters, and it sounded like you were confusing the type of engine you were dealing with. I chimed in because it sounded like you might have been chasing a noise from a source that wasn't present on your bike, and that would have been a waste of your time.

Sorry, Realshelby, I didn't see your post above mine where you covered that already.
 

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Wait until the hammer knock kicks in and the clutch basket starts rattling. I wear ear plugs so I don’t her much of it. First time I rode without ear plugs I thought the engine was about to detonate.
 

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When I first got my 2018 Vee, my Buddy noticed it I didn't have the idle rattle he had. But, after my first oil change, I had it loud and clear. The oil was good stuff, 20w-50. Rattle gets quieter when the clutch is in. Been searching threads for months and have heard all the theories, detailed research and after markets parts to minimize or fix it. But, nothing about Oil or When it actually started. My change was smooth and quiet, to Rattle and clank.
 

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Cost Efficient Anti Noise Measures.

I had my dealer change my oil per the 600 mile inspection requirement on my 650. I thought I noticed a slight bit more clatter or drumming with the clutch pulled in than when I picked it up, but it ran fine, so I rode on to 4000mi and did an oil & filter & brake fluid change myself (it was delivered to me with tea-colored DOT4 in both reservoirs- left over 2017 new in'18). I used an OEM oil filter and Suzuki Ecstar full synthetic 10w40 and NAPA DOT4. Right away the clutch noise went away and it seemed overall quieter, but in the way my car seems quieter after I wash it. Brakes have a more solid feel, but stopping power is about the same.
But the biggest performance improvement and may be good fo another hundredth decibel less noise was switching to no-alcohlol 91oct premium. Noticibly more power throughout the rev range and maybe a half mi more mpg, unscientific using the in-dash Econo-meter or whatever its called.
Probably not, but the ticking sound might be one of the plug wires arcing to the head. I had an '80 Ford LTD that developed an arc from one of the the plug wires to the exhaust manifold. Replaced all the wires, plugs, distributor cap & rotor and it went away. Ancient technology but same sound. Might be worth checking out.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Lifter, puck, bucket, it sounds like we all agree that we're all on the same page :smile2:

Great point on listening for a CHANGE in the noises.

I'm not complaining about any of the noises, that's something a BMW rider would do :grin2: If they're normal noises then great, the machine is just chatty. Besides, I've found that letting her blast up thru the gears and wind up to about 7grand in 6th gear on the Autobahn is a great way to hear all the right noises :wink2:
 

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Each iteration of this motor TLs/TLr/SV1000, and now through 3? generations of the DL1000 has been noisy. The valvechain is chattery at best and the clutch basket likes to make a decent racket.. BUT.. They are known to be reliable engines that will survive hard use...plus, in the the DL, the engine is in a significantly reduced state of tune than in the TL's and SV so that should further increase its survivability. Keep in mind.. its a well-hammered out 22 year old design that was probably a bit before its time and will probably be used for years to come...
 

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I have found the cure to my engine noise is to twist the right side grip a little more...
 
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