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I'm a total newbie to motorcycles and loving my new(used) K4 DL650. Besides what RPM to run cruiser style vs. highway style, I don't know when my bike is warm enough to ride. How long should I run it before getting on. 1 LED, 2 LEDs ? Or just turn it on and go.
 

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Is it running? It's warm enough to ride :) Seriously with fuel injection as soon as the rpm's settle you are good to go (assuming it's not -20 out, then it may need a few seconds).
 

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If the bike starts, it's ready to ride, no waiting needed.
 

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On cold mornings I give it time to warm up to 1 bar. On sunny summer days - I turn it on before I put on my helmet and gloves. About 30 secs warm-up.
 

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As others have said, it doesn't take much warming up. I usually start mine then put on my helmet and gloves and go. Even that may be more than is necessary.

As for what RPM to run, the longer I have my 650 the higher I tend to rev it. I used to lug around town at 3- 3.5 K but now I try not to run at less than 4k and preferably 4.5 or higher. Some here recommend cruising at 6K; that still seems high to me but maybe I'll come around to their way of thinking eventually.

I'm a total newbie to motorcycles and loving my new(used) K4 DL650. Besides what RPM to run cruiser style vs. highway style, I don't know when my bike is warm enough to ride. How long should I run it before getting on. 1 LED, 2 LEDs ? Or just turn it on and go.
 

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30 seconds for the oil to circulate and you are good to go but don't run it too hard until it's up to operating temp. Avoid wide open throttle when the bike is cold. It's the same procedure for any internal combustion engine that you don't want to abuse. But don't lug the engine either as that is harmful too.

I normally shift around 5-6K and try to cruise the backroads between 4-5K. When I'm pushing the twisties or cruising the highway and then those numbers ramp up. The bike makes good torque in the 5-8K range so running in that range works well for me. But don't be afraid to take it all the way up when the bike is warm, the rev limiter will protect the engine.
 

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Just keep it under 5000rpm until one bar appears and don't red line it until two bars are present for best results. The engine warms up best with a light load rather than a no load idle so running it under 5k rpm to begin with is better than a fuel and time wasting idle.
 

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On cool mornings I let it idle while I put my gloves and helmet on, then go. On warm mornings its put the gloves and helmet on, start, and go. I usually take it easy until 1 bar shows.
 

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There are hills in any direction that I go from home, so I always give it 1 bar before I take off so it's not having to work hard when it's completely cold. I then accelerate no more than moderately until it's fully warm.

The one place that I have to take off almost immediately with a cold engine is after a ferry crossing in the winter. The bikes go in the front of the boat and get full wind blast, so it can easily be back to 0 bars after a 30 minute crossing. Not much choice but to start and go right up the ramp at the dock, but I do at least wait until the idle settles, ride gently, and then stop in the parking lot to wait for 1 bar.

But that's just me.
 

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For no reason other than it feels right to me, I gear up and if necessary wait until one bar and keep it under 5k until I get three bars.

Happiness...is a warm Wee. :mod2_clap:
 

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Motors actually warm up slowly when idling. IMO the best method for warming up any motor is to idle at low rpm until motor responds cleanly to small blips on throttle, usually about 1/2 minute at least for fuel injected motors and sometimes longer for carb motors depending on fuel jetting. Then start riding at max 1/3 throttle and low rpm until warmed up to normal operating temp. I will always get up to full operating temp before entering freeway or any situation requiring full acceleration.
 

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I turn the key and let the clutch out as soon as I can get my hand on the throttle. My gravel driveway is 3/10ths of a mile long. By the time I get to the hardtop I let it rip.
 

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Idea

The idea of warming the bike up is to assure that the oil is circulating and the internal parts (mostly the pistons) are up to temp, before requiring a large portion of the maximum power output. If the pistons haven't heated (expanded) to the proper clearance, and the oil flowing freely to the cams, running the bike full throttle probably isn't a good idea. So if you have a freeway on-ramp at the end of your driveway, perhaps a little warm-up time would be a good idea. If you are riding city streets, not so much an issue. As others have mentioned, the bike warms up faster under light load than when idling, and it is probably more a matter of being light on the throttle until you have temp showing on the gauge. Of course, we're likely talking about an abused engine getting only 75,000 miles, and a pampered engine getting 200,000.
 

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Unless you live at the base of an on-ramp for a high-speed highway, it is almost always best for the motor to ride away almost immediately after starting it.

When cold, engines have the highest wear. Gaps in the pistons are largest. The engine runs rich with excess fuel sprayed into the intake. Water (byproduct of combustion) condenses on cold engine parts. Unburned fuel and water gets past the rings and both washes oil off the cylinder and causes acids to develop in the crankcase. Unburnt fuel and water get in the exhaust and can lead to corrosion there if the exhaust doesn't get good and hot during the ride. When idling there is more stress on the bearings and other parts so there is higher wear there.

Engines warm up much faster and run smoother when under light load and so have much less wear and tear. The higher crankcase ventilation while running at revs help remove unburnt fuel and moisture, and the faster warmup helps ensure you don't get a buildup in the oil.

The best strategy is to start the motor and ride as soon as the engine is drivable. On a Strom that is moments after startup so you should ride away at moderate loads almost immediately after you start.

..Tom
 
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