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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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I am in the process of replacing my cushion lever and swingarm bearings on my 2007 DL-650. I have 62,885 miles on the bike and I have never done any maintenance in this area.

When the job is complete, I will post a full "How To" tutorial from start to finish.

I decided not to order my bearings ahead of time before I started this job. I wanted to fully disassemble the back end of the bike before I placed an order for parts to make sure my list was complete for the parts that I needed.

In between the time of placing my order for parts and receiving that order, I have a little down time. I thought I would share a few tidbits for those of you who are contemplating doing this job.

There are two "special" tools that you will need to purchase or make to remove the swingarm pivot axle. The cost of one of those tools is between $50 - $90, (a socket to remove the the pivot axle locking nut). The other tool is a 19mm, (3/4"), hex head, (allen wrench), socket. The hex head wrench costs around $18 - $20 at a local Napa store.

The left side of the swingarm pivot axle is a 15/16" nut which is fairly straightforward.

On the right side of the bike, you will have to remove the pivot axle locking nut and the pivot axle itself.

This is what the "working relationship" between the two look like. The locking nut is threaded on to the pivot axle. The pivot axle is threaded into the frame of the motorcycle. (What looks like "goo" or grease around the nut is actually dried silicone. I use silicone to keep the left and right rubber, pivot axle covers in place.).


I purchased a 1/2" drive, 1 3/16" impact socket from Napa. It cost me, $8.78.


I wrapped masking tape around the rim of the socket so that it would be easier to mark where I needed to make the modifications to it so that I could remove the pivot locking nut. I checked the fit.....


.....and, made my marks. The depth of the "teeth" only need to be about 3/16" - 1/4" deep.


I cut verticle "kerfs", following my lines, with a hacksaw.


I used a Dremel tool to cut out the spaces between the "teeth".


Dremel has a fiber reinforced wheel that works perfectly for this type of a job. The wheels come in 5 units per package, (Dremel #426). I burned through two wheels to complete the cuts I needed to make.


I checked the fit of the socket again and "tuned" the teeth with a mill file.


Here is a photo of the finished homemade pivot axle locking nut removal tool.


I snapped the socket on to my 1/2" drive ratchet, slid my trusty copper pipe "cheater bar" over the ratchet's handle and gave it a tug.


The locking nut broke free and spun off, (there is thread-locker on the threads). Here is a photo of the locking nut and the socket I modified.


Next I needed to make a tool to remove the actual pivot axle. I have several old sparkplug sockets laying around. Often you will find that, smaller sized sparkplug sockets have a "hex head" and by coincidence, they fit perfectly. The one in the photo below is from the very first socket kit I purchased to work on my 1969 VW bus I bought back in 1979 as my first car.


Others that have chosen to go this route say that, they could slide a ratchet extension through the sparkplug end of the socket and have it lock into the drive portion, (doing exactly the opposite of how you would normally use the sparkplug socket and extension). NONE of the half dozen sparkplug sockets I had on hand would allow me to do this. There is a "metal barrier" between the drive side of the socket and the working end of the socket. An extension can't pass through the body of the socket and reach the drive end portion. The extension is blocked by the excess metal.

You can see the "barrier" down inside the drive end of the sparkplug socket.


Using a hacksaw, I cut the drive end of the sparkplug socket off just above the metal barrier.


I knocked off left over burrs with a mill file and snapped my new 19mm hex head wrench on to my ratchet. (I used a 1/2" drive to 3/8" drive adaptor).


I slid my copper pipe cheater bar over the end of the ratchet handle.....


.....and gave the wrench a tug. The pivot axle broke free, (there is thread-locker on the threads).


I pulled out the pivot axle and removed the swingarm.


You may notice that there is not a centerstand or a jack holding my motorcycle in the air. That is because I chose to hang my bike from my garage ceiling rafters. You see, the exhaust system also needs to be removed to get the swingarm off of the bike. That also means my skidplate and mounting hardware had to be removed too. Therefor, there was no way to support my motorcycle from underneath.

I drilled two holes through the ceiling joists and made some loops out of large battery cable wire I had laying around. I added some thread-locking "D-rings", some rock climbing webbing and a come-a-long to lift the back end of the bike up in the air.




I didn't like how the bike swayed back and forth, pivoting off of the front wheel, so I added, left and right "stabilizing straps" to the crashbars; using standard ratchet straps.


Since starting this project on New Year's Day, I moved the original "pick up" point from the rear of the bike to the passenger footpeg brackets. The original setup put too much strain on the rear of the bike. I couldn't unlock and remove the seat. The passenger footpeg brackets work better.




Nice, unencumbered way to work.


More at a later date.

Barry
 

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Sticky:yesnod: Very nice explanation Barry. Dude, if you ever have a garage sale, PM me. :fineprint::green_lol:
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #3
Sticky:yesnod: Very nice explanation Barry. Dude, if you ever have a garage sale, PM me. :fineprint::green_lol:
Thank you.

You wouldn't believe just how much stuff I given away! I have been downsizing over the past two years trying to get as "slim" as I can to position myself for my next move. I have been in this place for nearly 4 years. Maybe the next "move" will be out on the road? Been thinking about it and doing what I can do to learn everything I can about the bike, (and I enjoy sharing what I learn.). I will let you know if I come to the point of "sell everything" and weigh anchor.
 

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Thank you

Black Lab, thank you very much for showing your work. I notice you say there is a nut on the left side which seems normal but on the right side the locking nut is unique to me since I've never seen a setup like this on a dirt bike. Once the left nut is removed and the locking nut on the right is removed, then, if I understand you correctly, the axle is loosened and threaded out. What is it threaded to? The frame? I should go out look at the bike in the garage but it is too cold and I live in Texas. Yes, I can't handle cold weather so please don't count me in for a garage sale in Maine.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #5
Black Lab, thank you very much for showing your work. I notice you say there is a nut on the left side which seems normal but on the right side the locking nut is unique to me since I've never seen a setup like this on a dirt bike. Once the left nut is removed and the locking nut on the right is removed, then, if I understand you correctly, the axle is loosened and threaded out. What is it threaded to? The frame? I should go out look at the bike in the garage but it is too cold and I live in Texas. Yes, I can't handle cold weather so please don't count me in for a garage sale in Maine.
The setup is exactly as you have guessed. "Normal" nut on the left, locking nut on the right, the axle is threaded into the frame.

B.
 

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I'm looking at pulling my swingarm for the first time in 100,000 miles. The pics in the OP are not showing up for me. Did anyone happen to save them?

Jamie
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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They are no longer on the hosting site. They process with pics eventually wind up at Black Lab Adventures when Barry gets some time to do them.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #9

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #11
Those how-tos of yours are missed when not available. Thanks for taking the time to resurrect them.
I promise that more of them will be forth coming in the near future. I have two "smaller ones" queued up for editing right now.

I just finished designing and building a sheet metal brake for the construction on my airplane. It sucked up about as much time as my previous, "Black Lab Modification" threads! I have not posted the photographs and text to my airplane website yet, but when I do, high on my list is to forward a link to you.

You will be proud of this one, my friend. I outdid myself with the amount of steel that I cut up, bolted together, and welded. The sparks that flew about my garage exceeded all other spark creating projects, combined! I caught myself on fire three times!

Anyway, that project has had my undivided attention for many weeks. As of last night, it is officially completed. Now, I have to teach myself how to use it, (to consistently produce identical bends), and write the article about how I created it.

Here is a little teaser for you, Pat:







Check out the burn holes in my sweatshirt.




When the article is finally written, and posted to my site, (Sonex #1504 | "Scratching" My Way Into The Sky!), I will link it into the "Off Topic" section of this forum.

B.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Making a brake, now that's cool.
 

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I promise that more of them will be forth coming in the near future. I have two "smaller ones" queued up for editing right now.

B.
Your posts on Wee-Stroms are something I consider to be "required reading". You have saved me time and grief on projects I have done on my Wee.

Thank you for doing this.
 

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Thanks Heaps

Those how-tos of yours are missed when not available. Thanks for taking the time to resurrect them.
Even thou I had the manafacture's instructions on rear shock replacement, I read yours as well and with the pics it made the job a lot easier :thumbup:
Cheers,
Chops
 
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