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Hi all,
Before I can start adding accessories to my bike, I need to put a fuse block or distribution block on. I have never done this before so I'm wondering if there is any brand that y'all have found to work great or even some to stay away from.

I intend to put on an Aux power port for charging phones, some driving lights for visibility, add some heated gear, possibly throw my Sirius on for longer trips, and I'm thinking about upgrading the headlights to the HID lights.

So far I've been looking at the following:

I really like this one:
Motorcycle Info Pages - Recommended Stuff :) > FuzeBlocks

I like how you can have any component switched or constant just by moving the fuse. I also like how there's a decent cover for it.

My concern with this one is it's load limit, 10A or less. Is that enough?

This one seems ok:
TwistedThrottle.com : Electrical Connection accessory power distribution plate - EC.02202

Everything is switched though and there's no cover.

This one is meh:
Automotive Fuse Panels From Centech

Has both switched and constant, but limited to a certain amount.

Is there another out there I should look at?
 

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--You can run items with more than 10 amp draw off the battery--as always, fuse the positive leg.
--I'd avoid the one with the exposed terminals and get one where they are covered by an insulated cover.
--Keep in mind that we want to run the negative leg back to the battery, not bonded to the chassis. A fuse block with a negative section works, or a negative bus wire, or individual wires to the battery negative terminal works.
--Get two longer screws for your battery terminals. That makes it easier when you have more than two ring terminals on the battery terminals.
--You will want some of your new gizmos switched--powered only when the engine is running. You will want others unswitched--always connected to the battery, e. g. trickle charge connection.
 

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Do what you think is best. I went down to my local boat shop and got a marine grade block. I know some people don't like the "open" ones but I've had no trouble with mine. Mine is under the seat so it's pretty waterproof. I've since cleaned up the appearance but here is a prior photo. Rated at, IIRC, 30amps, it's switched via an automotive style 30a relay. I think I've got maybe $20-$25 in my set-up. Mine now carries my SIRIUS, heated grips, heated clothing, 12v power outlet, GPS, etc. If it will stand up to marine use it will be fine for motorcycles.

 

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12V electrical delivery systems do fine even if they get a bit wet and covered does not mean waterproofed. The stock handlebar switches are not waterproof. Dielectric grease on contacts and connectors can help because connectors hold onto water and connector corrosion is exacerbated by water.
 

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I used a bluesea fuseblock, 1025 (if I remember correctly). Wired through a relay like was mentioned above.
I can't remember the main fuse off hand (25-30 amp). And it has various ports to put in whatever is safe for that particular system.

GPS, Radar, LED driving lights, voltmeter, front turn signal running lights, LED trunk running lights, extra LED brake lights, and autocom are all plugged into the block..
 

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I went cheap.

I decided to use a Radio Shack terminal block. I switched 6 out of the 7 available poles. I added 2 outlets on the handlebars, 2 outlets under the left side cover, and heated grips. Here is the pictures.

RR power shelf



RR under cover dual power bracket



Terminal Block

 

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I used a bluesea fuseblock, 1025 (if I remember correctly). Wired through a relay like was mentioned above.
I can't remember the main fuse off hand (25-30 amp). And it has various ports to put in whatever is safe for that particular system.
I use the 5026 and it works perfect. Fits well, has plenty of connections and is marine grade. Was less than $40 to buy it in the store but I see that the store has been bought by another marine retailer and the price is now $50
 

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Radio Shack sell a strip where each connector is in a little round insulator and is discrete . They are separated and easily is zip tied to any frame component

I have always made a daisy chain for both positive and ground. Looping one side lug to lug. Then the individual things are connected to the other side.

I then mounted another one on the fairing mount for additional distribution
 

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Hey Stromtroopers,

First post here. I came across this thread while searching for details on hooking up a distribution block to my SV1000. I've been using this tutorial on CanyonChasers.net. (It's worth noting I really don't know much about electronics, but I can solder, attach crimp connectors, change pickups on my guitars, etc.)

I was about to begin my installation, but then realized that my accessories (Tourmaster heated jacket, Stebel Nautilus horn, and [soon] heat grips) have 0-ring connectors designed for battery terminals that are too large for my radio shak distribution block. (The rings don't fit between the black walls.)

The Canyon Chasers tutorial doesn't address this issue. Should I look for a larger distribution block? Or should I cut the ends off my accessories and attach smaller prong connectors?

THanks!
Jesse
 

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Jesse, that depends on the style of terminal, but yes, snip it, strip it, twist the strands and then tin it with a light coating of solder. Then crimp the right style of connector on. The best connectors have a bit of strain relief in the form of a secondary crimp around the insulation. If there's a Radio Shack or auto parts store nearby, get a bit of shrink tubing too. That slips over the wire before you install the terminal, then you pull it over the terminal and the end of the wire and heat it with a butane lighter for just a second or two. It will shrink up tightly and give you a good insulated seal that will keep the terminal clean and protected.
 

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There will be a fuse between the battery and distribution block.
That may be cheaper but it's messy. Neat wiring is easier to troubleshoot and less likely to cause problems. I'd like mine to be a lot neater but I don't seem to have the patience.
 

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Welp... I hooked everything up and there is no power coming from the distribution block. However, the relay does makes a click sound when I turn on the key.
 

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OK, thanks. I had a hunch this was OK but wanted to double check.



There will be a fuse between the battery and distribution block.
That won't protect the individual branch wiring out of your fuse block, though... Say if you have a 30amp fuse between your battery and fuse block and 10amp branch wiring (say to aux lights or something)...then that 10amp wire (whatever gauge) isn't protected with the 30amp fuse.... Maybe I am missing something here, but I think each electrical accessories should have individual fuses rated for that particular wiring...
 

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I bought the Centech AP-1 and then got their wiring harness too. Probably could have saved a few $$ putting it together myself, but who knows what I might have melted. Jim Stafford at Centech is good about answering e-mail questions too. After I installed it I did about a 500 mile weekend, about 6 hours of which was in the rain. Worked great, no problems. It still looks a little like spaghetti but the battery terminals are freed up. It's just held in place with Velcro. No matter what you use, there just ain't that much room.
 

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Your link is for barrier strips or bus bars that don't have fuses. They are okay for grounding blocks and it doesn't matter whether you affix smaller rings or grind the edges of the present rings as long as they don't fall apart. For power distribution, you want fused blocks. Some include:

Fuseboxes.
FUZEBLOCKS.COM
Centech AP-1 Auxiliary Fuse Panel : Amazon.com : Automotive
ST Blade Fuse Blocks - PN - Blue Sea Systems

great list; thank you wise one.

looking at the Blue Sea option as the most affordable. Though it's $60 at the local marine shop I can get one for $40 on ebay.

some questions:
1) What's a negative bus? Do I need one? Want one? There are options with and without on the Blue Sea product line.

*got the answer to this. negative bus is where the black wires for each item go. i was thrown by the fact that they offer options with and without. if there's no negative bus you have to run the grounds all back to the battery (or somewhere) and it's probably messier

2) Some blocks (Eastern Beaver, Fuze) allow 2 inputs so you can run some circuits switched, some non-switched. Does the Blue Sea?
 
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