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Discussion Starter #4
Doing a bit of homework, I 'm not sure any of them are accurate at a standstill.

When I first got the bike, I was dumped twice when I started a turn in second gear. Today, I was in heavy traffic and again, for some stupid reason I thought I was in first and was in second. Luckily, it just stalled and I was going in a straight line.

All of these problems are newbie problems. I actually don't need it while moving since I "feel" the gear/speed/rpm ratio's. It's those DAMN first gear starts particularly since I do a lot of city riding. I wish there was a 1st gear light and I would be fine.

Anywho...I decided not to buy it unless I know for a fact that it can tell it's 1st gear from it's electrical butt.
 

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I had one on my FZ1. When you shift out of neutral it assumes you are in first gear. It was accurate from then on if you shift one gear at a time. Shifting two or more gears at a time while stopped or while downshifting would confuse it for a short time. Impossible to read in direct sunlight and looks like a digital wart on your otherwise clean dash. Not worth hacking into your wiring harness IMHO.

Bill
 

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This type of gear indicator looks like a very bad idea -- you have to be moving and fully in gear to be accurate, and in that case you probably already have a good idea what gear you're in.

The GiPro actually uses the output from the gear position sensor in the transmission to directly indicate what gear you're in. (It also plugs neatly into existing connectors.)

I think the Wee only has a neutral switch, (so this type of device isn't possible) but on the Vee the gear position sensor is a variable resistor, with a certain set resistance at every gear.

In stock form, it's used to indicate neutral and 6th gear, and I believe the fuel mapping changes a bit in the lower three gears as well. In fifth and sixth, there's a combination of secondary throttle restrictions and fuel cuts to limit top speed.

The trouble is, the readings from the Vee's gear position sensor seem to get inconsistent at high mileage -- either the contacts get dirty or the resistors deteriorate. For example, at about 60K my Vee started turning the 6th gear OD light off and on at random. So I wonder how reliable a gear indicator could be, unless I clean or replace the gear position sensor.

I installed a de-restrictor device that basically lets the neutral signal through and otherwise only tells the computer that the bike is in fourth gear. This eliminates the power restriction and (more importantly) turns off that damn useless OD light.

I agree that a gear position indicator is a nice convenience (my old GS850 has one), but it's certainly not needed.

With all due respect, if you're dropping the bike repeatedly because you keep leaving it in second, the problem is your software, not the bike's hardware. You don't need another blinkenlight to distract you from the bike and your surroundings.

Upgrade your skills, please -- specifically, practice downshifting all the way as you come to a stop, and practice the skill of knowing exactly what gear you're in at all times as you approach corners. These are taught in the MSF course, but it's up to you to practice them until it's automatic.

Of course, human wetware is infinitely fallible -- that's why you also need to develop the skills to compensate when you find yourself in the wrong gear. This happens to all of us, even highly experienced riders, with embarrassing frequency.

When I find myself in second or even third gear at a stop, I instantly recognize the problem as I start to let out the clutch, and automatically slip the clutch more and keep the revs up so I can at least start moving safely. I'd much rather abuse the clutch a bit than drop the bike.

Same thing with entering a corner in the wrong gear -- it happens all the time to all of us, but you have to learn to compensate smoothly. A gear readout won't solve this problem anyway -- when cornering, you should be looking as far ahead as possible, not anywhere near the dash.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This type of gear indicator looks like a very bad idea -- you have to be moving and fully in gear to be accurate, and in that case you probably already have a good idea what gear you're in.

The GiPro actually uses the output from the gear position sensor in the transmission to directly indicate what gear you're in. (It also plugs neatly into existing connectors.)

I think the Wee only has a neutral switch, (so this type of device isn't possible) but on the Vee the gear position sensor is a variable resistor, with a certain set resistance at every gear.

In stock form, it's used to indicate neutral and 6th gear, and I believe the fuel mapping changes a bit in the lower three gears as well. In fifth and sixth, there's a combination of secondary throttle restrictions and fuel cuts to limit top speed.

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Dropping the bike repeatedly...OUCH. No. Twice when I first got it last year. The combination of the weight and four decades between rides.

In city traffic, there are a trillion things to look for and occasionally I lose count. A quick look adds a bit to the "no mistakes allowed" in heavy traffic.

More importantly, are you saying that the GiPro ALWAYS knows what gear it's in? I have the 650.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had one on my FZ1. When you shift out of neutral it assumes you are in first gear. It was accurate from then on if you shift one gear at a time. Shifting two or more gears at a time while stopped or while downshifting would confuse it for a short time. Impossible to read in direct sunlight and looks like a digital wart on your otherwise clean dash. Not worth hacking into your wiring harness IMHO.

Bill
I'm assuming it's like the one I was looking at. Not the GI-Pro?
 

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More importantly, are you saying that the GiPro ALWAYS knows what gear it's in? I have the 650.
Yes it does but it will take a fraction of a second to establish that number after a shift. But even more importantly, knowing what number gear you are in should not be a factor in keeping the rubber side down. Just keep the revs over 3000rpm when doing any maneuvering. Slip the clutch if caught too low. If you are stopping, pull in the clutch and keep clicking down on the shifter until it stops clicking.
 

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are you saying that the GiPro ALWAYS knows what gear it's in? I have the 650.
Yes, but it is about a half-second or so late to report. A big advantage is that you see what gear you're traveling in and know how many gears to downshift to get to the gear you need.

Try some parking lot practice where you do starts and very slow tight turns in second. It won't hurt the clutch, and you'll build "feel" to handle the bike in unexpected situations.
 

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These bikes should be able to handle a 2nd gear start EASILY. I would be stunned if you couldn't pull off a 3rd gear start on occasion. If you are dropping a bike because you are in too high a gear, you have bigger issues than if you need a gear indicator. Personally I just keep shifting up until I get in the right gear for what I'm doing or the OD light comes on. The OD prevents me from reaching for 7th, something I was known for doing at least twice a day on my previous bike. Coming to a stop just keep downshifting until you run out of gears, then go up one for N. Better to be in the right gear when coming to a stop should you need to emergency avoid something in front or behind you ... you do watch for inattentive drivers coming up behind you at a stop don't you?
 

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I think the Wee only has a neutral switch, (so this type of device isn't possible) but on the Vee the gear position sensor is a variable resistor, with a certain set resistance at every gear.


The trouble is, the readings from the Vee's gear position sensor seem to get inconsistent at high mileage -- either the contacts get dirty or the resistors deteriorate.

The 2011 DL650 has a gear position sensor. I don't know about the earlier models. It provides different voltage levels for each gear position. Between gear positions and in neutral, the signal is pulled high to 5 volts.

I made a gear position indicator for my 2011 which uses a PIC micro-controller. I measured the voltages in all the gears. The micro-controller compares those pre-measured voltages against the real time voltages from the GPS and displays the appropriate gear on the 7 segment LED. The gear indications are instantaneous.

If the GPS voltages change over time, it is just a matter of changing the voltage parameters in the micro-controller program.

The display also automatically dims in low light conditions.

Ron :mrgreen:
 

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how to know your in 1rst

Had a little trouble for the first few days knowing when I was in 1rst gear. For me, I found that if I let the rpm's go down to about 2k it was easy to get into first. As GW said, just kick it down until you cannot go anymore. There should be a hard stop of the gear lever. Also, make sure your are using the clutch not only to gear down, but when you are starting off. You should really feel the bike start to take off at a relatively low rpm if in fact you are in 1rst gear. Practice makes perfect. Good Luck:thumbup:
 
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