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Discussion Starter #1
Just trying to figure out whether I should dab a bit of the dielectric grease on the fittings when replacing my busted turn signal? I've got the stuff sitting around, wasn't sure whether it was wise or essential or a very bad idea or just a total waste of time.

Replacing with Buell Uly signals, plus the extra adapter for the wire.

Thanks...
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It won't hurt and could help performance. Weigh the likelihood of water causing corrosion against the mess factor.
 

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Dielectric grease lubricates and helps seal out moisture (the grease part) and is not conductive to electricity (the dielectric part). Most of the time when it is put on electrical contacts it is physically pushed aside and the contact is made and electricity passes through as it should. I use dielectric grease on the sealing rings for the connectors on the bike & car so they're easier to pull apart the next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm mainly hoping it doesn't make it too much tougher to get in there to top off the blinker fluid... I always dread that :biggrinjester:

Thanks all...
 

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I replace the blinker fluid with 100% di-electric grease for hot weather. In the winter, it thickens up too much and the blink rate is really slow!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you have an issue with the blink rate, you might want to check the infarkulator gap on your Fetzer Valve. That sometimes sticks in cold weather.
 

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I will bring it back on topic. Having been a Electrical Engineer and an Avionics Tech in my past, i use dielectric grease on all electrical connections. Yes, it doesn't conduct electricity but when you put the connection together it displaces the grease from the connection itself (as Greywolf has already said). The reason for the grease is that it keeps air from the connection as it is around it after you have make the connection and thereby reduces corrosion significantly. This makes the electrical connect more reliable over time. A good example is a car battery. I am sure that most of you have seen car battery terminals covered with "fur." This is corrosion. It happens on a smaller scale (I hope) to any electrical connection that you do not physically disturb (unplug and plug in) over time. It is usually caused by something called bimetallic conduction. I will not go into the physics of that here, you will just have to take my word on it or google it for yourself. Anyhow, the dielectric grease cuts the air off to the connection (oxygen is a necessary component of corrosion) thereby keeping corrosion to a minimun.

It does not improve your electric connection, that is purely a mechanical thing. You must have a tight connection to get a good connection. Whether it be by soldier, high quality air tight connector or butt splice (or a variant) you have to have that tight connection. If you can move the parts of the connection (wiggle it) it is not tight enough and you will have electrical problems with that connection. Good tight mechanical connection and lack of corrosion are the two components that make a good electrical connection.

There you are, a short synopsis of good electrical connections...

Oh, I forget to add. The ground back to the battery of your motorcycle counts as an electrical circuit. That electricity has to get back to the battery for the circuit to be complete so what I said goes not just for the "hot" side but the ground side as well. This is true for any electrical circuit, be it your motorcycle, your car, or television or even your house (where the electrical lines are serving as an alternating current battery).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm guilty as well for the sideways slide... :)

I'm looking at these spade connectors and wondering in earnest how the heck I'm going to squeeze them through the M8 nut and the washers. Any trick to that, while we're semi-on-the-off-topic?

I figure I might have to strip some of the sleeve off, pull the little plastic caps off the male connectors, push through one at a time inside the cowling, and then put the plastic caps back on and assemble into the harness at that point. Seems a little gnarly. If anyone has a clever trick on this, I'm interested in hearing it.
 
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