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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings.

It’s cold, dark, raining and the phone isn’t ringing. I thought now would be a good time to ask. If it’s a question that’s been asked before – I apologize. Here goes…

I turned 73 this year. Been riding motorcycles for a long time. When younger, I took a few trips from HBG PA across a couple of states to see family and such. This trip will be different. It’s a Bucket list trip from NW NC with no trip direction or destination yet determined. That’s what I’m posting about.

My 2019 Wee AT is equipped and ready. I’m in good shape, physically and mentally. I have excellent all-weather gear. It’s simply a matter of packing. Tent / motel – undecided. Maybe both. Alternate. 2 nights camp – 1 night with roof and shower. Restaurants will have to suffice – no desire to deal with gas stoves, utensils, pots and pans. I do that at home, all the time.

I'll be riding solo so will be packing reasonably light.

As I live very near the BRP, my friends and I are blessed to be this close to some wonderful roads and scenery. But I want to explore some different terrain and territory. Fire roads and tarmac only. Daily travel distances will be decided by my surroundings and next destination, if I have one. Won't be on any tight schedule.

When: Spring 2020
Trip duration: 10 to 14 days total.

North, South or West, if you have any route / destination ideas or suggestions, I would love to hear from you. :mod2_scooter:

TIA.

Cheers.
 

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I second the MABDR, having done it this past September. You might also consider heading for warmer climes - west - and doing some of the other Backcountry Discovery Routes.
 

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AirBnB can make touring much less stressful if you don't want to worry about setting up a campsite in rain or getting eaten alive by bedbugs in a shitty motel. This summer on my cross-country I booked two days in advance, and often stayed for under $55 in places far better than the average motel.
 

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I over heard a conversation of some retired guys at a hot springs near Death Valley. In essence the one fellow said he was leaving in the morning. When asked what direction he was going he replied, "Depends on which the way the wind is blowing."
If you are at the liberty to the vagaries of the weather, go where you have a tail wind and explore the land.
Keep us informed of the travels.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gentlemen,

I come to this forum because I enjoy the camaraderie of the good people here - always friendly - always helpful. Thank you for your comments. As each of you know, planning a trip of this kind is one of the most important parts of the trip. I am listening, taking notes, and very much encouraged by your recommendations.

Cheers.
 

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Best part of a trip like this is the discovery of things both exciting and beautiful that WEREN'T on the planned agenda. Most memorable and enjoyable trips I've taken out west were the ones where I got up in the morning, looked at the map, and picked the twistiest roads, the most remote roads, the roads that took me AWAY from the touristy areas to some place less well known.

Leave yourself enough time to stop and smell the roses...or whatever. Don't over-plan and don't try to cram in too many miles per day, so you have time to detour toward a new adventure, to stop in at an interesting little coffee shop or road attraction, or just linger at an overlook and enjoy where your bike has taken you.

Good travels!!!
 

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You have enough time to go to the Pacific coast and back. Depending on how many miles per day you are comfortable with on that bike. The East coast has some wonderful riding. Much more technical.

But nothing matches the scenery of riding out West! 191 in Arizona. Much of Utah is breathtaking. Nevada north of Las Vegas, head to Beatty. Explore Ryholite then head across Death Valley. Some of California is simply beautiful to ride in.

A lot depends on the time of year. And that can take you further north if heat is an issue. Colorado's Million Dollar Highway then up into Wyoming via Leadville then into Montana.

There just isn't too many wrong turns when exploring!
 

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You have enough time to go to the Pacific coast and back. Depending on how many miles per day you are comfortable with on that bike. The East coast has some wonderful riding. Much more technical.

But nothing matches the scenery of riding out West! 191 in Arizona. Much of Utah is breathtaking. Nevada north of Las Vegas, head to Beatty. Explore Ryholite then head across Death Valley. Some of California is simply beautiful to ride in.

A lot depends on the time of year. And that can take you further north if heat is an issue. Colorado's Million Dollar Highway then up into Wyoming via Leadville then into Montana.

There just isn't too many wrong turns when exploring!
100% agree with this. Go west! You can be in Colorado in two days and explore from there.
 

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Taidog1, a few years back I decided that I would take a 14 day ride. I had picked the area generally of the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains. I allowed 2 days out and 2 days back. There would be 2 other guys going with me. I found and contacted a motorcycle tour company in that area. They catered to European and Japanese clients. They provided BMWs and it was all inclusive packages, hotels, etc.

After a couple of calls and stumbling on to a mutual acquaintance, he understood that we didn't need the bikes and I was not about to go into the tour business he agreed to sell me a set of route charts.

One of the first questions he asked was are any of you "peakers"? I thought he said tweekers! When I asked him what he meant he explained that some riders want to include the famous high mountain peaks. But also that those peaks are where all the motorhome folks go and the traffic can be slow and painful. I answered that we were not peakers. I mention that to you as a consideration to avoid super popular tourist destinations. In the end he planned 10 days of the most beautiful riding ever. He even noted a notorious speed trap which we putted through and gave the police a polite nod.

I agree that spontaneity can produce treasures. However, I'm positive that we never could have stumbled upon these roads and landed at a good hotel every 7 hours without his expertise.

Also check out https://www.bestbikingroads.com/
 

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Nice to pick an event or a destination, then head that way with good detail secondary roads map. I'm bad for venturing off on river/ twisty roads that turn up on the GPS screen. Mind the fuel level, it's taken me years to break the habit of heading out of bounds with a 1/2 or less fuel.
AAA stopped posting camp sites on there maps. Now I use 5+ year old AAA maps.
Happy Travels
 

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I'm 73 this year and did a cross Canada on the CB500x that matched the trip with my son in 2015 when I was on a Wee.

BUT .... I don't camp. AirBnB especially with a hot tub and failing that Super8 have been decent. I use an app ( TomTom ) that has a winding roads feature that takes you in the general direction you want to go but sniffs out the more interesting roads and you can set it to avoid both dirt roads and super highways.

Have had some really nice treats come out of that feature.

Good luck.

I'll likely do the East Coast in June this year... my fav time of year to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Best part of a trip like this is the discovery of things both exciting and beautiful that WEREN'T on the planned agenda. Most memorable and enjoyable trips I've taken out west were the ones where I got up in the morning, looked at the map, and picked the twistiest roads, the most remote roads, the roads that took away from the touristy areas to some place less well known.

Leave yourself enough time to stop and smell the roses...or whatever. Don't over-plan and don't try to cram in too many miles per day, so you have time to detour toward a new adventure, to stop in at an interesting little coffee shop or road attraction, or just linger at an overlook and enjoy where your bike has taken you.

Good travels!!!
Understood and couldn't agree more BJ... thanks. Still a long ways from deciding, but TX, NM, UT, CO and WY are calling. :smile2: No real destination, just the journey. Am taking good notes on recommended routes.
 

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Camping vs motels.

You simply cannot make as many miles a day if you camp. I have done it. Too much time setting up in the evening, too much time taking down a damp tent and gear in the morning. While I have tested and proven gear there is simply some time and trouble to deal it with when camping.

Motels are not cheap. But you wake up and can be on the road in 20-30 minutes. Refreshed and ready for the day. No worries about weather coming in while setting up camp. You can ride an hour or two longer. Really rack up the miles and feel better doing it.

I sometimes camp at the destination ( like going to the V Strom Rally at the Ironhorse ), but will stay a night or two at a motel while on the road getting there.

Now it seems the KOA's are not so cheap. Other places are hit or miss as to showers and bathrooms when camping.
 

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Camping may be an issue for us older folks. I did it a lot when younger, but at 65 I don't want to sleep on the ground anymore.

Big plus for Colorado and northern Arizona. Mountain roads and beauty to rival anyplace on earth.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Camping vs motels.

You simply cannot make as many miles a day if you camp. I have done it. Too much time setting up in the evening, too much time taking down a damp tent and gear in the morning. While I have tested and proven gear there is simply some time and trouble to deal it with when camping.

Motels are not cheap. But you wake up and can be on the road in 20-30 minutes. Refreshed and ready for the day. No worries about weather coming in while setting up camp. You can ride an hour or two longer. Really rack up the miles and feel better doing it.

I sometimes camp at the destination ( like going to the V Strom Rally at the Ironhorse ), but will stay a night or two at a motel while on the road getting there.

Now it seems the KOA's are not so cheap. Other places are hit or miss as to showers and bathrooms when camping.
OK - you saved me $200+ on a decent tent. I have, however, lost 1,316 hours researching and finally deciding which tent to buy.

This is why I've asked for suggestions here. Well said. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Taidog1, a few years back I decided that I would take a 14 day ride. I had picked the area generally of the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains. I allowed 2 days out and 2 days back. There would be 2 other guys going with me. I found and contacted a motorcycle tour company in that area. They catered to European and Japanese clients. They provided BMWs and it was all inclusive packages, hotels, etc.

After a couple of calls and stumbling on to a mutual acquaintance, he understood that we didn't need the bikes and I was not about to go into the tour business he agreed to sell me a set of route charts.

One of the first questions he asked was are any of you "peakers"? I thought he said tweekers! When I asked him what he meant he explained that some riders want to include the famous high mountain peaks. But also that those peaks are where all the motorhome folks go and the traffic can be slow and painful. I answered that we were not peakers. I mention that to you as a consideration to avoid super popular tourist destinations. In the end he planned 10 days of the most beautiful riding ever. He even noted a notorious speed trap which we putted through and gave the police a polite nod.

I agree that spontaneity can produce treasures. However, I'm positive that we never could have stumbled upon these roads and landed at a good hotel every 7 hours without his expertise.

Also check out https://www.bestbikingroads.com/
With a fee of course, would you be willing to share the source and/or routes? Good advice in your post. Thanks.
 

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With a fee of course, would you be willing to share the source and/or routes? Good advice in your post. Thanks.
Hi,
Yes, I bought the maps / route chart. More exactly I rented them. I promised that we would have a little burning ceremony when we left, and we did.

I just tried his website _ it is gone. I sent him an email and it bounced. I'm hoping that he retired and is enjoying life in a tropical setting. But while searching I can see that there are several other tour shops. On a subsequent year I did the Moto Marathon. Home | Motomarathon John is the guy who runs it. A great guy and last I knew was still riding an early edition V 1000. Check him out.
 
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